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Image: 3D-printed absorber for endovascular treatment of liver cancer; Copyright: UCSF graphic

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

11/01/2019

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.
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Image: index finger of a hand points to a printed text; Copyright: panthermedia.net / j.dudzinski

AI approach outperformed experts in identifying cervical precancer

11/01/2019

A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has developed a computer algorithm that can analyze digital images of a woman's cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention. This artificial intelligence (AI) approach, called automated visual evaluation.
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Image: Stethoscope wraps alarm clock on wooden table; Copyright: panthermedia.net / mattkusb

Tiny digital 'tags' improve eye care by tracking every step

10/01/2019

Called radio-frequency identification (or RFID), the tool helps streamline operations by knowing where everything is and where everything goes. It can help a large store maintain a clearer picture of inventory counts, for example. At the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, RFID serves another purpose: to track and reduce patient wait time and enhance time spent at the doctor's office.
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Image: The Digital Precision Cancer Medicine Platform; Copyright: University of Helsinki

Digital health to support precision cancer medicine in iCAN

09/01/2019

The Academy of Finland has selected the "iCAN Digital Precision Cancer Medicine" competence cluster as one of Finland's six flagships. The iCAN public-private partnership forms a platform aiming to improve the treatment of cancer patients and to support innovations coming from high quality research.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08/01/2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Label-free intraoperative nonlinear imaging of the tumor microenvironment; Copyright: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

07/01/2019

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Prof. Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room by using a new portable optical imaging system. This work marks a major step toward providing cancer researchers with a tool for tracking tumor progression.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: nonlinear imaging of the tumor microenvironment; Copyright: Biophotonics Imaging Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Novel imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

21/12/2018

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Professor Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue shortly after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room. The researchers achieved this using a new portable optical imaging system developed in Boppart's lab.
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Image: A doctor looks at a x-ray.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/minvervastock

Higher radiation dose increases cancer risk

21/12/2018

Extremely obese people are needing a far higher dose of radiation during x-ray examinations than people of normal weight, increasing their risk of cancer, new research has shown.
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Image: A child lying on a bench.; Copyright: Hubert Vuagnat

Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease

20/12/2018

Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions, disabilities and stigmatisation. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects.
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Image: The researchers tracked the development of stem cells using so-called confetti reporters.; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Brain confetti - why our sense of smell declines in old age

20/12/2018

In mammals, generation of new neurons (neurogenesis) is mainly limited to early childhood and occurs in adulthood only in a few regions of the forebrain. One such exception is olfactory neurons, which develop from stem cells via several intermediate stages.
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Image: Sweating woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Andriy Popov

Wearable sweat sensor pioneer issued key device patent

19/12/2018

Eccrine Systems, Inc., an advanced sweat sensor company, today announced that a key patent, US10136831, has been issued to Dr. Jason Heikenfeld, Co-Founder & CSO, and prominent University of Cincinnati researcher. The company holds exclusive rights to the UC patent.
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Image: new study about pain perception; Credit: Kurt Bauer / Technical University of Munich

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain

17/12/2018

Pain is a negative feeling that we want to get rid of as soon as possible. In order to protect our bodies, we react for example by withdrawing the hand. This action is usually understood as the consequence of the perception of pain.
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Image: New deformable particle model; Copyright: Mark Shattuck, CCNY

Shape shifting cell breakthrough

12/12/2018

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.
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Image: doctor and brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / rfphoto

PET scans to optimize tuberculosis meningitis treatments

10/12/2018

Tuberculosis of the brain - or tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) - is often deadly, always hard to treat, and a particular threat to young children. It may leave survivors with lifelong brain damage. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have used PET scans, a rabbit model and the TB drug rifampin to advance physicians' understanding of this disease.
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Image: The MPI team: Noelia Díaz, Kai Kruse and Juanma Vaquerizas; Copyright: MPI Münster

Nuclear architecture diagnostics within reach of the clinic

07/12/2018

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biomedicine in Münster and of the Medical Faculty of the University of Münster have developed a technique that allows the characterisation of the three-dimensional organisation of the DNA in the nucleus directly in patient's cells.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03/12/2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03/12/2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03/12/2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: Dr. Yuval Rinkevich; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Targeting scar-free wound healing

03/12/2018

Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app. Few clinically-tested mobile apps exist today with clear measurable goals to support continued care of cancer survivors and patients.
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Image: MRI post ablation; Copyright: Radiological Society of North America

Cryoablation shows promise in treating low-risk breast cancers

29/11/2018

Cryoablation-the destruction of cancer cells through freezing-shows early indications of effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancers, according to research being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Researchers said that over the four years of the study, there has only been one case of cancer recurrence out of 180 patients.
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Image: Thymus; Copyright: panthermedia.net / CLIPAREA

Researchers develop new surgical technique for studying the thymus

27/11/2018

Elisa Oltra, head of the Genetic Exppression and Immunity group of the Faculty of Medicine at the Catholic University of Valencia (UCV), in collaboration with Alejandro Caicedo, professor of the Department of Medicine of the University of Miami, have developed a surgical process which makes it possible to place functional fragments of the thymus in the anterior chamber of the eyes of mice.
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Image: Darmkrebs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Sebastian Kaulitzki

Screening for colorectal cancer spares intense treatments

26/11/2018

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the world. Every year in Finland, approximately 3,000 new cases are diagnosed, and roughly 1,200 patients die of it. Between 2004 and 2016, an extensive screening programme was conducted in Finland, intending to study the potential benefits and downsides of a nation-wide screening for colorectal cancer.
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Image: Doctor on a computer display examines RNA-sequences; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

New technique improves single cell RNA sequencing

26/11/2018

In the era of personalized medicine, scientists are using new genetic and genomic insights to help them determine the best treatment for a given patient. In the case of cancer, the first step toward these treatments is an investigation into how tumor cells behave in an effort to figure out the best drugs to use to attack them.
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Image: polyol-modified nanoparticles checking out blood vessels surrounding the tumors; Copyright: Yoon Yeo/Purdue University

Cancer identity technology makes it easier to find tumor's "address"

16/11/2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients. One of the big issues with chemotherapy is that most treatment approaches focus on the tumor itself without paying attention to the microenvironment surrounding the tumor.
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Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08/11/2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
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Image: Tooth on a green glove; Copyright: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

New material may make broken fillings a thing of the past

07/11/2018

Soon you may no longer have to worry about how long your dental repairs will last. A new dental reconstruction material developed in Sweden offers unprecedented improvements over existing acrylate-based fillers.
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Image: Jorge Serrador with the electrical stimulator ; Copyright: Nick Romanenko, Rutgers University

New device improves balance in veterans with Gulf War Illness

05/11/2018

Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers.
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Image: Brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd.

Brain infection or cancer? A new rapid test could hold the answer

02/11/2018

When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord. The differences in diagnosis can mean having mere hours to act. Researchers at Jefferson have developed a test that could rapidly parse out infections of the brain from other diseases.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Heart cells as seen through a microscope; Copyright: Cedars-Sinai

Biomarker discovered for most common form of heart failure

01/11/2018

A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker - a protein found in the blood - for the most common type of heart failure.
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Image: Microscopy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Gaining unknown insights

01/11/2018

When bones break easily in old age, osteoporosis is often to blame. The cause of the disease and how it develops is not yet sufficiently understood. An interdisciplinary team of scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the Helmholtz Zentrum für Materialien und Energie in Berlin (HZB) is developing a new imaging process to solve this problem.
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Image: Measurement of brainwave activity in a child with autism; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

30/10/2018

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can impair communication ability, socialization, and verbal and motor skills. It generally starts in early childhood and is diagnosed through behavior observation. This means of assessment can be imprecise, which is especially problematic when early identification is vital for developmental follow up.
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Image: Infectious bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net / katerynakon

Machine learning identifies antibiotic resistance genes

29/10/2018

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed an approach that uses machine learning to identify and predict which genes make infectious bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The approach was tested on strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis--the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It identified 33 known and 24 new antibiotic resistance genes in these bacteria.
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Image: Antibody against tumor cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / toeytoey

Novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

29/10/2018

Belgian research groups from the UCLouvain and WELBIO, VIB and Ghent University, and the biotechnology company argenx elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity against tumor cells in cancer patients.
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image: Silhouette of a woman walking up a staircase by the sea; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Exercise Prescription for Health: sports instead of pills

08/10/2018

Did you know that we can influence up to 50 percent of our health ourselves? If we eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly, this not only ensures longer independence in old age. Diseases can also be treated with exercise. But in many cases, physicians and patients still rely more on medication than on exercise.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01/10/2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10/09/2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01/06/2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08/05/2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: View into a cockpit over the shoulders of the pilots; Copyright: panthermedia.net/natamc

Intensive care medicine: More safety thanks to aviation knowledge

08/12/2017

What do intensive care medicine and aviation have in common? In both fields, mistakes can quickly put people's lives at risk. That's why high safety standards should be a matter of course for both. Having said that, medicine lags behind by comparison because staff members often lack the opportunities to train for emergency situations and the proper tools to prevent patients from being harmed.
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Picture: two women perform exercises and are wired with electrodes; Copyright: University of Erlangen/Wolfgang Kemmler

Whole-body electromyostimulation training: fitness or prevention?

09/10/2017

Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) promises time-efficient muscle strength training that has positive effects after just a few sessions per week. Its objective is a fast increase in muscle mass and reduction of body fat. Can WB-EMS training replace conventional strength and endurance training? And can it help to prevent diseases or pain?
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Image: Male hands keep Smartwatch and Smartphone with the same health application side by side; Copyright: panthermedia. net/Alexey Boldin

mHealth: Doctor in your pocket

02/10/2017

Since the eHealth Law took effect on January 1, 2016, it has become apparent that digitization also affects the healthcare system. Its objective is to improve the digital infrastructure of healthcare. For several years, a subcategory of electronic healthcare solutions has enjoyed increasing popularity: mHealth.
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Image: Entrance hall of the MEDICA

New Additions to MEDICA 2017 – MEDICA LABMED FORUM, MEDICA START-UP PARK, and MEDICA ACADEMY

02/10/2017

This year, expect a series of exciting innovations that include the informative and practice-oriented MEDICA ACADEMY, the START-UP PARK for newcomers and networkers from the startup arena and the interdisciplinary MEDICA LABMED Forum.
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Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02/10/2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
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Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22/09/2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01/09/2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03/07/2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: A physician is holding a globe in his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response

08/06/2017

After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
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Image: Two elderly are sitting beside each other, looking on a screen, where a bingo game can be seen. One woman is standing up; Copyright: SilverFit, Robert ten Berge

SilverFit – Training and gaming for the elderly

01/06/2017

Movement is good for health, but people do it less and less as they age. The Dutch company SilverFit wants to counteract this. Their devices that combine sport and game are primarily aimed at elderly people. Their goal: to give people joy, fun and motivation to move – both in rehabilitation and in daily life.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01/02/2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
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Image: Different eye stents lying beside a coin; Copyright: I.Chen

Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01/02/2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: Boy lies in a hospitalbed and is looking up to a doctor whose hand lies on the boy's shoulder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/spotmatikphoto

"Always be honest" – How to communicate with critically ill children

02/01/2017

When children suffer from a critical or terminal illness, the first impulse of adults is often to not tell the children and sugarcoat the situation. Yet it is just this type of behavior that frequently causes children to emotionally withdraw.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: A smiling old man is sitting next to a group of younger people; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Diseases of aging: lifestyle and prevention also pay off

01/12/2016

A German proverb says, "Old age is like a hospital that accepts all diseases," and medicine confirms that older people are not only considerably more susceptible to infectious diseases than they were in middle age, but that body and mind are also less resilient and recover slower or not at all from adverse effects or injuries.
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Image: In the middle of a computer window is written in big white letters Diabetes. A hand is tapping onto the word; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pichet Wissawapipat

Telediabetology: Telemedicine to fight diabetes

02/11/2016

World Diabetes Day is on November 14 of this year. This is reason enough to get informed about the options available in medicine on the subject of "diabetes". One area is telediabetology, a combination of telemedicine and diabetology. It is still not widespread in Germany, but that is about to change because the benefits for patients, physicians and hospitals are obvious.
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Image: Woman lying along on a couch. Her right leg is moved by a man standing next to her; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia

Preoperative rehabilitation: Fit for surgery

24/10/2016

Preoperative rehabilitation is gaining importance in medicine. It helps to prepare patients for upcoming treatments and surgeries, thereby reducing risks and complications during surgery and making faster rehabilitation possible.
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Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
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Image: surgery Copyright: Klinikum Weiden/private

Intraoperative imaging – added benefit or high-tech gadget?

01/09/2016

Monitoring individual results during surgery with an angiography system? This is already an option in approximately 200 hospitals in Germany. Thanks to intraoperative imaging, major medical procedures can be replaced by minimally invasive surgery because physicians are able to monitor the results immediately. This is gentler on patients and decreases the number of subsequent revision surgeries.
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Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
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Image: OR with modern equipment, large screens and lamps; Copyright: Erwin Keeve, Charité

OR of the future: technology benefits surgeons

01/09/2016

When it comes to the future of medicine, we often ponder how we would like to be treated. On the other hand, there is the issue of how physicians would like to treat their patients. The surgical procedures are determined by the technology that doctors are surrounded by. That’s why technology development also needs to be adapted to the needs of surgeons in the operating room of the future.
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Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear

22/08/2016

A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Photo: Children play soccer in a park

Hard work pays off: even sick people benefit from physical activity

01/07/2016

Children instinctively know this – exercising is fun, makes you happy and keeps you fit. This begs the question of when and why this innate love for movement dwindles in many of us as we get older. After all, diseases like type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure can be considerably controlled with sufficient exercise.
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Photo: Men and women running

Individualized sports medicine: training by design

22/06/2016

Exercise makes you healthy – oftentimes even when you are sick. That’s why doctors hardly ever recommend taking a break from it. Even patients who are about to receive a heart transplant can benefit from sports. As is so often the case, the dose makes the poison. We asked sports medicine physician Prof. Martin Halle, what people need to consider.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ MihaPstock

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Doctor at laptop

New E-Health Act: "Patients have control over their data"

08/05/2016

The "Act on secure digital communication and applications in the health care system" (the e-Health Act in short) took effect on December 29 last year. By the end of 2018, hospitals and medical practices will be gradually introduced to the new features of the electronic health card and telemedicine.
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Photo: Keyboard with heart symbol

Big data in cardiology: IT platform to manage "flood of data"

01/05/2016

In addition to patient counseling and clinical diagnostics, the lion’s share of a cardiologist’s work consists of collecting data to be able to better treat future cases based on the gathered information. Until now, this data was recorded in Excel spreadsheets or many other communication platforms. A software is designed to facilitate a cross-industry exchange.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: Knee implant

Customized Implants cover bones optimally

22/01/2016

It may fits, but somewhere it still tweaks. Although a suit off the rack serves its purpose, it is still far from being an ideal solution. With a custom made heart it is different. It is similar with implants. Often patients complain about the fact that those implants feel strange. 3D printing is on the best way to change this. Here, the implants are adapted to the carrier.
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Photo: white jeep

Rapid Tests: valuable helpers for use in the field

04/01/2016

Infectious diseases are widespread in conflict areas. When basic medical care is lacking on location, people cannot be appropriately treated. Laboratory tests are limited in the field. Rapid diagnostic tests make it possible for medical personnel to quickly and accurately test patients for several infectious diseases, for instance for the presence of malaria or HIV infection.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Graphic: stent in a blood vessel

Mechanical thrombectomy: stroke treatment 2.0

01/12/2015

Each year, approximately 250,000 Germans suffer a stroke. This makes stroke the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. The circulatory disorder that occurs in the brain is normally treated using systemic thrombolysis, a procedure that bears various risks. Unlike mechanical thrombectomy, which offers clear advantages by comparison.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation

02/11/2015

Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy

03/08/2015

Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Transcatheter Pacing System: The world’s smallest cardiac pacemaker

01/07/2015

In the case of cardiac arrhythmia, the normal heart rate gets out of balance due to various reasons. In some cases, it is necessary to implant a cardiac pacemaker. Just like with any intervention, this type of surgery also involves risks. In the worst-case scenario, this can lead to abnormal wound healing or obliteration of the vascular system.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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The patient's perspective is also important for physicians

01/04/2015

Communication is the key to success when it comes to the patient-physician relationship. Compared to the past however, this relationship has changed somewhat: although physicians are still the experts, thanks to the internet and popular science, patients now also know more about health and diseases. An "informed patient" is not a problem for physicians, but rather a source of better understanding.
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Physician and patient: A complicated relationship

01/04/2015

The doctor-patient relationship isn’t always easy. On the one hand is the physician, who is responsible for helping many patients. On the other hand is the patient, who visits the doctor in the hopes of his or her problem being treatable. Things always get difficult when one of them feels that they don’t see eye-to-eye. And this happens a lot.
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Photo: Child in hospital

Pediatric pathology: Specialized knowledge for the youngest

02/02/2015

When children are sick, their parents take them to a pediatrician. A pediatric pathologist is needed when pathology exams need to be conducted. This branch of pathology requires specialized knowledge. The Society for Pediatric and Fetal Pathologists is championing the transfer and preservation of this knowledge.
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Photo: Bacteria

Fecal microbiota transplantation: A stranger’s stool heals inflammatory bowel disease

05/01/2015

It sounds strange: During fecal microbiota transplantation, the stool of a healthy donor is transferred into the intestines of a diseased patient to restore his or her damaged gut flora. This is an entirely normal process in the animal kingdom. Now the stool transplant has established itself as the standard for treating Clostridium difficile.
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Euthanasia – A Human Right?

01/12/2014

Several weeks ago on November 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who suffered from terminal brain cancer, took drugs to end her life surrounded by her family. This was preceded by months of despair and anguish, but also by love and a lust for life as the young woman describes in several videos she recorded to fight for the right to die with dignity.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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“When patient monitoring becomes too intensive, it violates human dignity and human rights“

01/12/2014

Modern medical technology shortens and makes care processes easier, while it ensures the safety of patients at the same time. However, monitoring or electronic sensors for remote surveillance keep being accompanied by ethical violations. Patients feel like they are being watched and in the worst-case scenario, robbed of their freedom and autonomy.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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The intensive care unit of the future - speedier recovery through feel good architecture

01/09/2014

The rooms in German intensive care units are cold and dreary. Hectic movements determine the patient’s everyday life along with noisy surveillance systems. Artificial light often also promotes a disturbed circadian rhythm. Sleeping pills are meant to solve this problem, but they also increase the risk of delirium at the same time.
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Hospitals: many small measures against infections and sepsis

01/08/2014

If neither the immune system nor antibiotics are able to control an infection, a sepsis can arise out of it - an infection that attacks several organs at the same time and causes the immune system to overreact. This is a life-threatening condition.
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Hygiene: "The sensor applies the principle of so-called photonic structures"

01/08/2014

Detecting infections quickly and reliably with the naked eye: This is what many doctors in hospitals and in the doctor's surgeries wish for. To make this dream come true, Prof. Holger Schönherr, a scientist from Siegen, is researching a sensor that should show an infection by a color change.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
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Sports and cancer: no panacea, but a necessary aid

02/06/2014

When are sports healthy, how often should you engage in sports and what effect do sports have on the body – over the past few decades, there were always different answers to these questions. Many studies that were conducted in the past however confirm the assumption that sports and exercise always support health, even if someone is already sick.
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mHealth Alliance: "Mobile health has the potential to improve healthcare for millions"

02/05/2014

Whether in remote areas or in a large city – people everywhere need good healthcare. Thanks to mobile health, more and more people can get medical help, even in poor regions of the world.
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Medical apps: functionality and safety is key

02/05/2014

Successful communication is most important in medicine. The most modern channels have been utilized in this area for quite some time now. Medical apps need to meet several requirements at once. For their use to pay off, they need to be beneficial for prevention or therapy. And to ensure a safe application, they also need to be both technically and medically flawless.
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Every minute counts: rescue workers fight against the clock

01/04/2014

When the call comes in at the dispatch center, things need to happen fast: rescue workers sprint to the car, race onto the street and make their way to the patient within a few short minutes. No more than thirty minutes later, the patient arrives at the hospital from which he is hopefully soon released again with a clean bill of health. At least that's how it works in theory.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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Clinical trials: "Registry-embedded clinical trials are the way of the future"

06/01/2014

Even medical risk products are not always tested as thoroughly as would be necessary – be it because of criminal energy, lack of know-how or financial reasons. A revision of clinical trial procedures could not only fix loop holes and methodological flaws. Products and methods could also be brought into general medical care more quickly under new rules.
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