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Super-resolved vascular imaging in vivo.  Credit: Pengfei Zhang, Lei Li, and Lihong V. Wang

Imaging: In vivo super-resolution PACT

19/04/2019

Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a non-invasive hybrid imaging technique that excites biological tissues with light and detects the subsequently generated ultrasound to form images.
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Image: man holds a wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair; Copyright: John Eisele/ CSU Photography

Laboratory medicine: sensor to detect viral infections

09/04/2019

A team of Colorado State University researchers has developed technology that can detect extremely small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Antibodies develop to infect cells or kill pathogens, essentially fighting off a bacteria or virus. The levels of antibodies in the blood can tell whether that person is sick.
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Image: doctor with stetoscope examines child; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wong Sze Fei

Imaging: Method to diagnose heart disease in children

04/04/2019

A new study by biomedical engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas could significantly improve methods for detecting and diagnosing congenital heart disease in infants and small children.
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Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03/04/2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Image: a woman during a MRI; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimplePhoto

Imaging: Contrast-enhanced MRI provides useful findings

02/04/2019

An essential part of breast intervention is the process of assessing concordance between imaging findings and core biopsy results. When pathology results are considered benign discordant, current standard of care is surgical excision, even though many of these lesions will ultimately be found benign.
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Image: the new wearable device; Copyright: Tae Hyun Kim

Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' captures cancer cells from blood

02/04/2019

A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. The device developed by a team of engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively.
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Image: Construction of an organelle in a living cell for protein biosynthesis; Copyright: Gemma Estrada Girona

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

01/04/2019

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: A researcher is filling liquid into glas tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreamedia Ltd.

Cell analysis: How blood cells and immune cells are produced

25/03/2019

Researchers tracked and quantified the production of different kinds of blood cells and immune cells to understand how the body maintains a balanced supply.
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Image: Transmission electron micrograph of heart muscle; Copyright: WWU Münster - Andreas Unger

Laboratory technology: New heart muscle component discovered

22/03/2019

The heart exerts muscular force by contracting numerous contractile units of the heart muscle. Biologists at Münster University have found out that a specific motor protein is responsible for the assembly and mechanical stability of these contractile units in the heart. The study has been published in “The Journal of Biological Chemistry”.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Image: patient with high blood presure; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dragonimages

Ultrasound energy to treat high blood pressure

22/03/2019

A one-off operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to maintain reduced blood pressure in hypertension patients for at least six months, according to the results of a clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).
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Image: CT scans of a human brain; Copyright: Insel Gruppe AG

Imaging Supplies: Fewer CT scans needed?

21/03/2019

A computed tomography (CT) scan of the head is routinely performed as a check after operating a subdural haematoma. However, this may prompt additional, unnecessary surgeries and result in higher costs as well as an increased rate of complications, without recognizable benefits for the patients.
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Image: doctor holds patient arm with catheter; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Andriy Popov

Catheter: Coating prevents infections

08/03/2019

Brown University researchers have developed a new antibacterial coating for intravascular catheters that could one day help to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections, the most common type of hospital-acquired infection.
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Image: woman working with microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Fabrice Michaudeau

'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster

05/03/2019

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device invented by researchers at the University of Kansas, The University of Kansas Cancer Center and KU Medical Center could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.
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Image: A blood sample is taken from young blonde woman in a blue shirt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Robotic sensor technology diagnoses reproductive health problems

26/02/2019

The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly and cheaply than current methods.
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Image: Big Data; Copyright: panthermedia.net / putilich

Big data approach evaluates autism treatments

08/02/2019

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
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Image: microvessel-on-a-chip; Copyright: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

04/02/2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
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Image: Schematical drawing to explain a blood test; Copyright: NHLBI

Can a blood test detect lung-transplant rejection?

29/01/2019

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident.
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Image: A girl balances a pink fidget spinner at the tip of her finger; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Fidget spinner separates blood plasma

28/01/2019

Some people use fidget spinners - flat, multi-lobed toys with a ball bearing at the center - to diffuse nervous energy or whirl away stress. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for the toys: separating blood plasma for diagnostic tests.
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Image: A man and a woman in the laboratory; Copyright:A. Battenberg / TUM

Evolution of signaling molecules

24/01/2019

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.
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Image: black-white-photo of an old woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ photographee eu

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

23/01/2019

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease manifest, the brain starts changing and neurons are slowly degraded.
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Image: blood vessel system in bones; Copyright: UDE/Matthias Gunzer, Annika Grüneboom

New blood vessel system discovered in bones

23/01/2019

A previously unknown network of fine capillaries directly connecting the bone marrow with the circulation of the periosteum has been discovered.
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Image: Healthy mucus layer (red) keeping Escherichia coli (green) at a safe distance within the colon, preventing them from breaking throug; Copyright: Bahtiyar Yilmaz, University of Bern

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

22/01/2019

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.
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Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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Image: man having a heart attack; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kzenon

Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

21/01/2019

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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