News from the Editors -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

More about…

Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03/04/2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
Read more
Image: A researcher is filling liquid into glas tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreamedia Ltd.

Cell analysis: How blood cells and immune cells are produced

25/03/2019

Researchers tracked and quantified the production of different kinds of blood cells and immune cells to understand how the body maintains a balanced supply.
Read more
Image: kidney organoid; Copyright: Anne Rios (Princess Maxima Centre) in Nature Biotechnology

Laboratory technology: Mini kidneys from urine cells

07/03/2019

Scientists from Utrecht University, University Medical Center Utrecht and Hubrecht Institute have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells. This could lead to a wide range of new treatments that are less onerous for kidney patients.
Read more
Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
Read more
Image: Rendering of a model of human skin; Copyright: panthermedia.net/megija

3D model of the human skin

31/01/2019

Scientists have successfully constructed a three-dimensional human epidermis based on predictions made by their mathematical model of epidermal homeostasis, providing a new tool for basic research and drug development.
Read more