News from the Editors -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

More about…

Image: PAGA based embedding of the developmental trajectories in the Zebrafish embryo, colored by timepoint.; Copyright: Wagner et al., Science (2018)

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

16/04/2019

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA.
Read more
Image: man holds a wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair; Copyright: John Eisele/ CSU Photography

Laboratory medicine: sensor to detect viral infections

09/04/2019

A team of Colorado State University researchers has developed technology that can detect extremely small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Antibodies develop to infect cells or kill pathogens, essentially fighting off a bacteria or virus. The levels of antibodies in the blood can tell whether that person is sick.
Read more
Image: Visualization on sample whole-slide images of the lung cancer histologic patterns; Copyright: Hassanpour Lab, Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center

New machine learning model classifies lung cancer

06/03/2019

Using recent advances in machine learning, a Dartmouth research team has developed a deep neural network to classify different types of a common form of lung cancer on histopathology slides at an accuracy level shown to be on par with pathologists.
Read more
Image: A green circuit board; Copyright: University of Bern

New device shows effect of sudden strain at the heart

01/03/2019

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill people by inducing cardiac arrest yet save others that are in cardiac arrest. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers of the University of Bern and the EPFL that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.
Read more
Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
Read more
Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
Read more
Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
Read more