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Microscope that provides a glimpse into living cells

Dear Sir or Madam,

Conventional optical microscopes are limited by the wavelength of light. That is why very small structures such as cell components, DNA molecules or proteins cannot be observed. Scientists from the research project ChipScope are currently working on a new generation of optical microscopes that use very small LEDs. They can be used as light sources to monitor the interior of living cells in real time. Get to know more about this new microscope in our current video.

Have a nice week!

Melanie Günther
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com


MEDICA Trade Fair with Forums and Conferences
Monday to Thursday
13 to 16 November 2017
Düsseldorf, Germany

Table of Contents

Video: Light microscope ChipScope
Topic of the Month: Not all lasers are the same
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Economy & Markets

The Ottawa hospital emergency surgery study

Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa are tackling the often-overlooked issue of delayed emergency surgeries. Emergency surgeries are those needed quickly to treat serious injuries or life-threatening conditions, such as a hip fracture, appendicitis or a burst blood vessel.
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Light microscope ChipScope - a glimpse into living cells

Video

Image: Preview picture of video "ChipScope"
A microscope that is only a few millimeters in size and that can help to consider cell changes in real time. This is the goal of the EU project ChipScope. Scientists led by Dr. Hutomo Wasisto in Braunschweig help to make this project come true.
Click here for the video!
Light microscope ChipScope - a glimpse into living cells
See more reports in our MediaCenter!
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Research & Technology

Bacteria never swim alone

Many animal species display flocking behaviour, but the fact that microorganisms do, is not as well known. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
read more
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Research & Technology

New gene mutation associated with Fanconi anemia

Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by high cancer risk. Researchers of the University of Würzburg now have revealed a new Fanconi anemia gene that is involved in complex DNA repair processes and may also play a relevant role in cancer prevention.
read more
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Research & Technology

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

People who were previously hospitalized for severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are at highest risk for recurrent dysglycemic episodes in the short term (within 30 days of the prior episode) and over the long term.
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Research & Technology

New gene therapy treatment routes for motor neurone disease uncovered in new study

Scientists investigating the genetic causes and altered functioning of nerve cells in motor neurone disease (MND) have discovered a new mechanism that could lead to fresh treatment approaches for one of the most common forms of the disease.
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Research & Technology

Reliable diagnosis of celiac disease in children without endoscopy

Over decades the diagnosis of celiac disease affecting about 1 percent of our children and adolescents required an upper endoscopy. Now a large international study – coordinated by the Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital in Munich – showed that in more than 50 percent of affected children, endoscopy can be omitted without reducing the accuracy of the diagnosis.
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Surgical lasers: the quest to be compact, mobile, and user-friendly

Topic of the Month

Image: A flat device with a touch screen; Copyright: biolitec AG
Not all lasers are the same – especially in the surgical field, it all depends on what’s inside: the different operational wavelengths of laser light also affect human tissue in different ways. This is why a single laser for a variety of applications drastically simplifies the job of physicians.
Read more in our Topic of the Month:
Surgical lasers: the quest to be compact, mobile, and user-friendly
Surgical lasers – flexible specialists, not only in the OR
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Research & Technology

Bacteria never swim alone

Many animal species display flocking behaviour, but the fact that microorganisms do, is not as well known. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that algae and bacteria form flocks at very low concentrations of individuals, a finding that could increase our future understanding of how the organisms infect their host animals.
read more
To top

Research & Technology

New gene mutation associated with Fanconi anemia

Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by high cancer risk. Researchers of the University of Würzburg now have revealed a new Fanconi anemia gene that is involved in complex DNA repair processes and may also play a relevant role in cancer prevention.
read more
To top

Research & Technology

Digital communication improves young patient engagement, according to new study

Using texts, emails, Skype and other digital communication methods can improve the health care experience of younger patients.That is the conclusion of new research, led by the University of Warwick and King's College London, which examined case studies from 20 NHS specialist clinical teams from across England and Wales.
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Research & Technology

Bandage with a voice

A novel bandage alerts the nursing staff as soon as a wound starts healing badly. Sensors incorporated into the base material glow with a different intensity if the wound’s pH level changes. This way even chronic wounds could be monitored at home.
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Research & Technology

Miniature technology, big hope for disease detection

The field of medicine is always on the lookout for better disease diagnostic tools - simpler, faster, and cheaper technologies to enhance patient treatment and outcomes. Currently, microfluidic bioassay devices are the preferred diagnostic tools that allow clinicians to measure the concentration of disease biomarkers within a patient's biological sample, such as blood.
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