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A look at the command center

Dear Sir or Madam,

Did you know that the brain is the most complex organ nature has ever produced? In our head, about 100 billion brain cells are interconnected and in milliseconds they turn our impressions and sensations into reactions. The work processes in our switching centre are particularly interesting for physicians and researchers who use functional imaging to take a look inside. Our current Topic of the Month, tells you what processes are available and what they are important for.

I wish you a relaxed week,

Katja Laska
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Functional imaging
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Functional imaging: a look at the command center

Topic of the Month

Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net / SimpleFoto
All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
Read more in our Topic of the Month:
Functional imaging: a look at the command center
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Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

AI for better assessment of brain tumor treatment

A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. In their recent publication, the authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Machine learning model describes cell development

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' captures cancer cells from blood

A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. The device developed by a team of engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Laboratory technology: New way of optical visualization?

High-resolution optical microscopy methods promise breakthroughs in materials science, biology, and medicine. Today, their possibilities basically reach those of scanning electron microscopy.
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Big Data: Software predicts risk of irregular heart beats

Combining a wealth of information derived from previous studies with data from more than 500 patients, an international team led by researchers from Johns Hopkins has developed a computer-based set of rules that more accurately predicts when patients with a rare heart condition might benefit--or not--from lifesaving implanted defibrillators.
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Smart wristband alerts dangerous health conditions

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania researchers are developing a smart wrist-worn device for monitoring of atrial fibrillation - a condition, which if left untreated can lead to serious health complications and even death.
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