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Organ-chips: Research on an ethical level?

Dear Sir or Madam,

Will we soon be able to carry out medical research without animal experiments - with organ chips on which different cell types can be investigated in combination? In recent years, we have come a step closer to this goal, but the human organism is complex - so complex that it is no easy task to recreate neuronal structures and other complex relationships between organs. Find out more about the limitations and future prospects of organ chips in our interview with Prof. Thomas Korff.

A pleasant week wishes

Diana Heiduk
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Organ-on-a-chip systems
Video: Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac
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Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

Topic of the Month

Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315
Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities. This begs the question of whether their results are actually applicable.
Read more in our Topic of the Month:
Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?
Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Graphene-based wearables for health monitoring

The first of ICFO's devices on display will allow customers to monitor their level of exposure to sunlight through a UV sensor. Designed as a flexible, transparent and disposable patch, it connects to a mobile device and alerts the user once he or she has reached a defined threshold of sun exposure.
read more
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Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Imaging: PET/CT agent promises better VTE diagnosis

A first-in-human study featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine reports that the novel positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) tracer 18F-GP1 showed excellent image quality and a high detection rate for the diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE).
read more
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Holographic microscopy to investigate cell stress

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have devised a new method to study how single biological cells react to stressful situations. Understanding these responses could help develop more effective drugs for serious diseases.
read more
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Gaming technologies can help cancer patients

Lancaster University is sharing in a €4m project to use gaming technology to improve the care of both adults and children with cancer.
read more
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Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Targeting epilepsy with electrodes on the head

Stimulating the brain with implanted electrodes is a successful, but very drastic measure. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Kempenhaeghe, Philips and Gent University will therefore be working on a method to stimulate the brain using electrodes that are placed on the head rather than inside it. Their goal is to customize treatment for patients with severe epilepsy.
read more
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Machine learning predicts unnecessary surgeries

Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a breast lesion associated with a four- to five-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. ADH is primarily found using mammography and identified on core needle biopsy. Despite multiple passes of the lesion during biopsy, only portions of the lesions are sampled.
read more
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Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac

Video

Image: Preview image of the video
In conventional radiotherapy, the tumor is first localized using CT and MRT images in order to calculate the irradiated areas. The major drawback in this case: the subsequent radiation only shows bone structures in the body but not the tumor itself. As a result, the radiated area is often larger than necessary. In our video you will learn how the MR-Linac can be used for more precise radiotherapy.
Watch the video here!
Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac
More videos in our MediaCenter
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