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Mini organs of the future

Dear Sir or Madam,

What is the cause of the disease? Is the therapy the right one? How do the drugs work? In the past, these questions were often answered using in vitro methods or animal testing. In particular, the latter often lead to discussions about whether they are ethically justifiable. Organs-on-a-chip offer an alternative. In our current Topic of the Month, you can read more about the artificially produced organs in miniature format, their advantages and the future developments.

I wish you a relaxed week,

Katja Laska
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

image: 18 - 21 November 2019, MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine in Düsseldorf

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Organ-on-a-chip
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Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

Topic of the Month

Image: cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco
So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative.
Read more in our Topic of the Month:
Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Learning transistor mimics the brain

A new transistor based on organic materials has been developed by scientists at Linköping University. It has the ability to learn, and is equipped with both short-term and long-term memory. The work is a major step on the way to creating technology that mimics the human brain.
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

3D imaging technique reveals pancreatic cancers start

A new technique to study tissue samples in 3D has revealed that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, solving a decades-old mystery of how tumours form. The new method could help researchers to get more information from tissue biopsies and may lead to improved treatments for pancreatic cancers. The technique was developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute.
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Artificial intelligence-tool for chemotherapy dosages

Finding the right dose of medication by trial and error can be a painful experience for patients. Thanks to a new algorithm created by Adrien Coulet, lecturer at the Université de Lorraine and researcher in a joint Inria and Loria team, in collaboration with researchers from Stanford University, an innovative tool can predict in advance whether patients will need a lower dose of medication.
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Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

New intelligent system for lung cancer diagnostics

Researches from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Russian Academic Excellence Initiative participant, in collaboration with the radiologists from St.Petersburg Clinical Research for Specialized Types of Medical Care have developed an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics. It analyzes patients' computed tomography (CT) results within 20 seconds.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
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Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

How to train lab-grown heart cells

Heart muscle cells need exercise - even when they grow outside the human body. A new device designed by U of T Engineering researchers uses a rigorous training regimen to grow small amounts of cardiac tissue and measure how strongly it beats. The platform is ideal for testing the effects of potential drug molecules and could help bring personalized medicine closer to reality.
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Public Health & Associations, Information and Communication Technology

Act(ive) against cancer - World Cancer Day 2019

On February 4th is World Cancer Day. The World Cancer Organization (UICC) launched this day in 2007 to raise awareness of various cancers. This year, the focus lies in particular on the prevention and early detection of cancer. In addition, people will be informed about diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up options.
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