Laboratory Equipment / Diagnostic Tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

News about Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica

Image: A microscope; Copyright: FAU/Sebastian Schürmann

Microscopy in the body

18/04/2019

Biotechnologists, physicists, and medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed technology for microscopic imaging in living organisms.
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Image: Cryo-EM structure of LA-PTH-bound human PTH1R in complex with Gs; Copyright: Zhao LH et al. 2019

Microscopy: near-atomic map of parathyroid hormone complex

17/04/2019

An international team of scientists has mapped a molecular complex that could aid in the development of better medications with fewer side effects for osteoporosis and cancer.
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Image: lab technician photographed at the microscope from below; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Robert Przybysz

Imaging: ultrafast 3D Images of Nanostructures

17/04/2019

Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyse complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective.
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Image: PAGA based embedding of the developmental trajectories in the Zebrafish embryo, colored by timepoint.; Copyright: Wagner et al., Science (2018)

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

16/04/2019

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA.
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Image: a robot; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

AI singles out neurons faster than a human can

16/04/2019

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can trace the shapes of active neurons as accurately as human researchers can, but in a fraction of the time.
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Image: purple 3D human knee meniscus created using the ultrasound-assisted biofabrication technique; Copyright: Rohan Shirwaiker, NC State University

Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

12/04/2019

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.
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Image: man holds a wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair; Copyright: John Eisele/ CSU Photography

Laboratory medicine: sensor to detect viral infections

09/04/2019

A team of Colorado State University researchers has developed technology that can detect extremely small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Antibodies develop to infect cells or kill pathogens, essentially fighting off a bacteria or virus. The levels of antibodies in the blood can tell whether that person is sick.
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Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03/04/2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Image: the new wearable device; Copyright: Tae Hyun Kim

Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' captures cancer cells from blood

02/04/2019

A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. The device developed by a team of engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively.
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Image: Picture of a new optical visualization of nano objects; Copyright: Kazan Federal University

Laboratory technology: New way of optical visualization?

01/04/2019

High-resolution optical microscopy methods promise breakthroughs in materials science, biology, and medicine. Today, their possibilities basically reach those of scanning electron microscopy.
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Image: Construction of an organelle in a living cell for protein biosynthesis; Copyright: Gemma Estrada Girona

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

01/04/2019

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Image: Radiolabeled protein lights up tumor implanted in the arm of a mouse under a PET scan; Copyright: Sridhar Nimmagadda

Imaging: Glowing tumors show cancer drugs

29/03/2019

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of a cancer remain unaffected.
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Image: A researcher is filling liquid into glas tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreamedia Ltd.

Cell analysis: How blood cells and immune cells are produced

25/03/2019

Researchers tracked and quantified the production of different kinds of blood cells and immune cells to understand how the body maintains a balanced supply.
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Image: Transmission electron micrograph of heart muscle; Copyright: WWU Münster - Andreas Unger

Laboratory technology: New heart muscle component discovered

22/03/2019

The heart exerts muscular force by contracting numerous contractile units of the heart muscle. Biologists at Münster University have found out that a specific motor protein is responsible for the assembly and mechanical stability of these contractile units in the heart. The study has been published in “The Journal of Biological Chemistry”.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Image: nanocrystals derived from plant cellulose; Copyright: Clare Kiernan, UBC

Implants: From foam to bone

20/03/2019

Researchers from the University of British Columbia and McMaster University have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone.
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Image: bioengineer Dr Chih-Tsung Yang pictured with the microfluidic cell culture chip in the foreground; Copyright: Joe Vittorio

Organ-on-a-chip: reducing side effects of radiotherapy

15/03/2019

The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers. UniSA biomedical engineer Professor Benjamin Thierry is leading an international study using organ-on-a-chip technology to develop 3D models to test the effects of different levels and types of radiation.
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Image: graphic showing how Usiigaci works; Copyright: OIST

Machine learning tracks moving cells

14/03/2019

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists have long struggled to quantify the movement and changing morphology of cells through time, but now, scientists have devised an elegant tool to do just that.
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Image: older man in a lab coat at the computer in the laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Viktor Cap

Computer kidney could provide safer tests for new medications

11/03/2019

A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of the first computational model of the human kidney. The new model will allow scientists to gain better insights into how new drugs that target the kidney, such as diabetes medication, may work.
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Image: two people in lab coats looking at something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Machine learning to the rescue

11/03/2019

The tsetse fly has wreaked devastation across large swaths of sub-Saharan Africa. About the size of a housefly, the insect transmits a parasite that can be lethal to both humans (sleeping sickness) and animals (nagana). A Columbia team is therefore pioneering a machine-learning based imaging and sorting solution that aims to drastically reduce Africa's tsetse population.
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Image: kidney organoid; Copyright: Anne Rios (Princess Maxima Centre) in Nature Biotechnology

Laboratory technology: Mini kidneys from urine cells

07/03/2019

Scientists from Utrecht University, University Medical Center Utrecht and Hubrecht Institute have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells. This could lead to a wide range of new treatments that are less onerous for kidney patients.
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Image: woman working with microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Fabrice Michaudeau

'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster

05/03/2019

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device invented by researchers at the University of Kansas, The University of Kansas Cancer Center and KU Medical Center could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.
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Image: Light photomicrograph of Lily ovary cross section seen through microscope in black and white; Copyright: panthermedia.net /Claudio Divizia

Implants: New method for developing artificial ovaries

04/03/2019

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) led by Prof. Aldo R. Boccaccini from the Chair of Materials Science (biomaterials) and Prof. Dr. Ralf Dittrich from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer.
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Image: The image on the left shows a normal cell while the one on the right highlights one of the discovered genes in neuroblastoma; Copyright: Troyanskaya Lab

Machine learning: Tool reveals molecular causes of disease

04/03/2019

Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: A green circuit board; Copyright: University of Bern

New device shows effect of sudden strain at the heart

01/03/2019

It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill people by inducing cardiac arrest yet save others that are in cardiac arrest. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers of the University of Bern and the EPFL that can replicate the experience in the laboratory.
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Image: A blood sample is taken from young blonde woman in a blue shirt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Robotic sensor technology diagnoses reproductive health problems

26/02/2019

The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly and cheaply than current methods.
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Image: A woman in a laboratory; Copyright: Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center

PET scans identify biomarker to guide chemotherapy

25/02/2019

In an effort to further individualize breast cancer therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that may accurately predict which patients with one type of HER2-positive breast cancer might best benefit from standalone HER2-targeted agents, without the need for standard chemotherapy.
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Image: A man and a woman working in a laboratory; Copyright: Jan-Peter Kasper/University Jena

Test system helps preventing chronic inflammation

25/02/2019

An international research team led by Friedrich Schiller University in Jena has developed a highly sensitive cell model to study the complex effects – and side effects – of anti-inflammatory drugs, with the ultimate aim of preventing chronic inflammation.
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Image: The two light paths of a cell; Copyright:Yen Strandqvist

Holographic microscopy to investigate cell stress

19/02/2019

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have devised a new method to study how single biological cells react to stressful situations. Understanding these responses could help develop more effective drugs for serious diseases.
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Image: Dennis Eickelbeck (left) and Stefan Herlitze make cells glow - with so-called optogenetics.; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

Thanks to light: Controlling and visualizing

18/02/2019

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualised serotonin receptor signals in neural cells.
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Image:  robot hand taps on a computer keyboard; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

AI can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients

18/02/2019

The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne, has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods.
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Image: robot with one finger on its head, next to it a brain made of luminous neurons; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

New AI toolkit is the 'scientist that never sleeps'

15/02/2019

Researchers have developed a new AI-driven platform that can analyse how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist. The platform, HRMAn ('Herman'), which stands for Host Response to Microbe Analysis, is open-source, easy-to-use and can be tailored for different pathogens including Salmonella enterica.
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Image: three clinicians in the lab in front of a computer.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Machine learning predicts unnecessary surgeries

13/02/2019

Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a breast lesion associated with a four- to five-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. ADH is primarily found using mammography and identified on core needle biopsy. Despite multiple passes of the lesion during biopsy, only portions of the lesions are sampled.
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Image: two men in the laboratory talking about a document in their hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Phovoi R.

Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs

12/02/2019

Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease.
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Image: Xiangyu Deng in the laboratory; Copyright: UGA

Machine learning to ID source of Salmonella

12/02/2019

A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
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Image: 3D bioprinting the Tumor Micro Environment of a glioblastoma; Copyright: University of Twente

3D-bioprinted brain tumor shows interaction with immune cells

11/02/2019

Around a glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain tumor, cells of the human immune system start helping the tumor instead of attacking it. To do research on what happens in the interaction of these cells, scientists of the University of Twente now created a 3D-bioprinted mini model of the brain.
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Image: Big Data; Copyright: panthermedia.net / putilich

Big data approach evaluates autism treatments

08/02/2019

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
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Image: brain with syringe and medication; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Michael Osterrieder

Breakthrough for brain tumor drug development

07/02/2019

24,000 patients are diagnosed with brain tumors every year with the 5yr survival for high grade glioblastomas (GBM) only 5%, with median survival of 15 months. These poor statistics have remained static for 30 years due in part to a lack of preclinical models for testing new drugs.
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MEDICA 2018, Düsseldorf, Germany

07/02/2019

The MEDICA was successfully held on 12- 15 November 2018. It was very pleasure to meet all visitors and sincerely appreciate many interests and supports to our products –Point-Of-Care Testing (HbA1c,...
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Image: PSI researchers are first to transfer state-of-the-art microscopy method to X-ray imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Romaset

Virtual lens improves X-ray microscopy

07/02/2019

X-rays provide unique insights into the interior of materials, tissues, and cells. Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method that makes X-ray images even better: The resolution is higher and allows more precise inferences about the properties of materials.
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Image: microvessel-on-a-chip; Copyright: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

04/02/2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
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Image: A female researcher is looking at a sample on a glass slide; Copyright: Tristan McGuirk

How to train lab-grown heart cells

01/02/2019

Heart muscle cells need exercise - even when they grow outside the human body. A new device designed by U of T Engineering researchers uses a rigorous training regimen to grow small amounts of cardiac tissue and measure how strongly it beats. The platform is ideal for testing the effects of potential drug molecules and could help bring personalized medicine closer to reality.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Rendering of a model of human skin; Copyright: panthermedia.net/megija

3D model of the human skin

31/01/2019

Scientists have successfully constructed a three-dimensional human epidermis based on predictions made by their mathematical model of epidermal homeostasis, providing a new tool for basic research and drug development.
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Image: Schematical drawing to explain a blood test; Copyright: NHLBI

Can a blood test detect lung-transplant rejection?

29/01/2019

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident.
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Image: An older man and an older woman in a swimming pool; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Zoltan Okolicsanyi

The healing effect of radon

29/01/2019

Natural thermal water that contains radon has been used for over 100 years to treat chronic degenerative, inflammatory and musculoskeletal conditions. Most patients experience a significant reduction in pain after treatment with radon, but the molecular mechanisms behind the treatment are largely unexplored.
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Image: A girl balances a pink fidget spinner at the tip of her finger; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Fidget spinner separates blood plasma

28/01/2019

Some people use fidget spinners - flat, multi-lobed toys with a ball bearing at the center - to diffuse nervous energy or whirl away stress. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for the toys: separating blood plasma for diagnostic tests.
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Image: A man and a woman in the laboratory; Copyright:A. Battenberg / TUM

Evolution of signaling molecules

24/01/2019

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.
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Image: black-white-photo of an old woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ photographee eu

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

23/01/2019

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease manifest, the brain starts changing and neurons are slowly degraded.
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Image: Healthy mucus layer (red) keeping Escherichia coli (green) at a safe distance within the colon, preventing them from breaking throug; Copyright: Bahtiyar Yilmaz, University of Bern

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

22/01/2019

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.
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Image: human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/net ilexx

Molecular profiling could catch lung cancer

22/01/2019

The world's first genetic sequencing of precancerous lung lesions could pave the way for very early detection and new treatments, reports a new study led by UCL researchers.
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Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Neighbours as guests at MEDICA - Interview at the Polish joint stand

15/11/2018

100 Polish exhibitors will be present at this year's MEDICA and show their new innovations in medical technology. You can find out what there is to discover at the Polish joint stand in our interview.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15/11/2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15/11/2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Past, present and future of MEDICA – Interview with Horst Giesen

12/11/2018

Even before MEDICA begins, the Düsseldorf trade fair grounds are alive like a beehive: in the halls, stands are built and exhibits are delivered, while the trade fair management coordinates logistics and services for exhibitors and visitors. We were still able to have a short talk to Horst Giesen, Global Portfolio Director Health & Medical Technologies of Messe Düsseldorf, despite all the bustle.
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No chance for bacteria on implants

12/11/2018

Hip and dental implant operations are routine. But not entirely risk-free. They may result in infection that is difficult to control with oral or intravenous antibiotics. In such cases, the implant...
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Individualized therapy for patients with osteoporosis

12/11/2018

More than six million people in Germany suffer from osteoporosis. The disease is characterized by chronic bone resorption, leading to frequent fractures as a consequence of the bone loss. In many...
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KNF presents new liquid pumps for medical device technology: Up to 20,000 hours of maintenance-free operation

06/11/2018

KNF, the technology leader in diaphragm pumps, presents its new FF 12 and FF 20 micro diaphragm liquid pumps at Compamed 2018 in Düsseldorf. The models have been developed for systems used...
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KNF introduces new micro gas sampling pump NMP 830 HP: Improved flow rate, vacuum and pressure

06/11/2018

With its NMP series, KNF provides micro gas sampling pumps which have proven their worth over decades of use, particularly for medical equipment. The new NMP 830 HP offers this market a...
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A Medica milestone – Luxfer Gas Cylinders to hit FIFTEEN million in global healthcare cylinder sales

05/11/2018

Luxfer Gas Cylinders invites Medica 2018 to #KeepMoving as it showcases its exclusive, ultra-lightweight medical cylinders and Portable Oxygen Concentrators (POCs) Confirming its status as the...
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Tray Wraps

01/11/2018

Clinipak wrap range is designed to overcome many common challenges encountered when sterilising, storing and transporting wrapped packs. Our flexible production methods ensure the best sizes are...
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Selfdiagnostics: a game-changer in the field of diagnostics

01/11/2018

Based on statistics from The World Health Organization WHO every 3rd cause of death in the world is due to infectious diseases and many cases could be avoided by timely detection of diseases.
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Moisture Solutions

01/11/2018

Clinipak offer an extensive range of liners designed to absorb and spread condensate during autoclaving to encourage drier packs. As a result of our flexible production methods, bespoke sizes can be...
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PureLab Plastics Joins “Together for Sustainability” Network – A Corporate and Social Responsibility (CSR) Program

26/10/2018

PureLab Plastics, expert in custom injection molding and precision plastics dedicated to Life Sciences, Medical and Healthcare industries, is proud to announce it has joined the “Together...
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Nano pulverizing of material at low temperatures Minimal (100mg) quantities can be pulverized in a short time.

23/10/2018

Nano Pulverizer NP-100CE was designed with an optimized planetary centrifugal ratio to maximize the collision energy. NP-100CE has strong centrifugal forces caused by rotation and revolution motion.
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Ointment compounding and preparation are completed in only 30 seconds!

23/10/2018

· It is unnecessary to adjust the weight which was necessary for ointment preparation by free balance method. · It corresponds to ointment containers of various sizes with multi adapter (10ml ~ 250ml).
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Fraunhofer FIT at MEDICA and COMPAMED: Electrowetting and Telemedicine

23/10/2018

At MEDICA Fraunhofer FIT presents the teliFIT platform for telemedicine and telecoaching, a modular system that can be tailored to a wide range of application requirements and guarantees a very high...
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Improves efficiency of mixing and deaeration of small amounts of material The smallest model of the series

23/10/2018

The centrifugal force of over 400G enables simultaneous processing of mixing, dispersion, and deaeration of various materials from low to high viscosities for general purposes. Furnished with a...
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Canada at MEDICA, Düsseldorf (November 12 - 15, 2018)

23/10/2018

Largest Canadian Participation Ever MEDICA – the leading international medical tradeshow – has been attracting generations of Canadian visitors and exhibitors. This year, an unprecedented 64 Canadian...
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NEW DIAGNOSTIC TECHNOLOGY TO PLAY VITAL ROLE IN TACKLING INFLUENZA EPIDEMICS

08/10/2018

With the USA in recovery from one of the worst flu seasons on record, scientists at BBI Solutions have highlighted the role that new technology can play in re-optimising the current generation of flu...
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EPI-DETECTION, an Innovative Automatic Pressure Monitor for Epidural Injections

05/10/2018

Saeum Meditec, a Korean firm, recently acquired European CE Mark approval for its EPI-DETECTION device, a novel digital pressure monitor with original technology developed by the company with...
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Wide range micro spectrometer UV2NNIR

04/10/2018

Based on our class visible range spectrometers, INSION continues to expand the measurement range from UV to NNIR (200 - 1050 nm). With our UV LED light source(280 nm - 450 nm), you can achieve the...
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HbA1c

30/09/2018

Our HbA1c reagent which is the highest quality at an extremely affordable price all over the world is now available.  
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Visit Lifotronic Diagnostic products please visit us at Hall3/D29‐12

20/09/2018

Lifotronic is a professional international medical enterprise specialized in the development, manufacturing and marketing of Bedside Treatment and Diagnostic products. Our booth for diagnostic...
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BLAST Sytem

19/09/2018

BLAST SYSTEM The new response to temperature control in ovens. Both the accuracy and uniformity that is currently expected by a laboratory oven  reconsidered a deeper investigation about how to...
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Digital & Quantitative Rapid Test

19/09/2018

In a partnership with True Diagnostics, Syntron brings the rapid diagnostic test up to a new level by applying digital & quantitative technologies. These tests include tests for detecting...
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new MediSmart® RUBY Plus blood glucose monitoring system

03/09/2018

We will present our brandnew MediSmart® RUBY Plus blood glucose monitoring system at MEDICA 2018! Come in and see first prototype....
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New Infectious Disease Antibodies

29/08/2018

Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies to: Strep A Strep B Candida albicans Legionella fungal beta-glucan Aspergillus
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Plant for the production of test strips and glucometers for diabetics will begin work in Irkutsk

17/08/2018

The plant for the production of test strips and glucometers for diabetics in September will work in Irkutsk. The products will be of high quality, but at the same time cheaper than analogues by 30%.
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A Plant for manufacturing test strips and glucometers will be built in Irkutsk

17/08/2018

The plant will munufacture glucometers and test strips designed to measure blood sugar based on an innovative technology that uses GDH enzynd carbon layer. The capacity of production facility is...
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Production Line for domestic glucometers starts in Irkutsk region

17/08/2018

In the Irkutsk region, a new factory for the production of glucometers began to install equipment. Issue a device for measuring blood sugar levels and test strips to them will begin in the next...
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Now available - Gastrointestinal diagnosis tests

01/08/2018

Boditech is proud to announce the launching of gastrointestinal diagnosis tests: iFOB Neo, Calprotectin and iFOB/Calp. Combo. These 3 products are available on ichroma analyzers: ichroma,...
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Rockland Immunochemicals, Inc. CSO Testifies on Scientific Reproducibility Issues at National Academies Session

01/08/2018

Rockland Immunochemicals, Inc. announced today that Chief Science Officer, Dr. Carl Ascoli testified at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s third of six public session...
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New Psychophysiological 360 Biofeedback Suite to be launched at 2018 Medica trade fair in Dusseldorf, Germany

26/07/2018

Announcement: Leading Biofeedback Manufacturer set to launch  it's New 360 Suite at the 2018 Medica Trade Fair in Dusseldorf, Germany. The 360 suite is a complete package of physiological...
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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US Patent Issued to Quantimetrix for Dipper POCT Urinalysis Dipstick Control

02/07/2018

Los Angeles, California, – Quantimetrix announces that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued Patent No. 9,835,562 and a pending patent application are directed to a liquid...
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Quantimetrix Launches Dipper POCT® Urinalysis Dipstick Control

02/07/2018

Quantimetrix announces the launch of Dipper POCT® Single-Use Liquid Urinalysis Dipstick Control – delivering an exciting new QC experience from the central lab to the point-of-care and everywhere...
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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The Elle TENS - A Great Modern Day Aid For Labour Making an Unusual TV Appearance in Poland!

14/06/2018

Recently on Polish national TV, a gynaecologist demonstrated on a male celebrity presenter what contraction pain feels like with the aid of muscle training equipment whose settings had been adjusted...
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30/04/2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: Several colorful pills placed on a target, one of them is in the center; Copyright: panthermedia.net/georgemuresan

Personalized Medicine – focused on healing

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not want to measure all patients with the same yardstick anymore. Instead, it aims to precisely fit the therapy to the cause of their disease. This often means a more successful treatment with less side effects for patients. And for physicians, interdisciplinary cooperation and decision making come to the fore.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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SynAbs inks agreement with SKLM as new distributor for its unique catalogue of monoclonal antibodies in Morocco

24/01/2018

SynAbs is proud to announce strategic deal with successful company SKLM. SKLM already distributes major references in the field of monoclonal antibodies and will consequently extends its catalogue...
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SynAbs inks agreement with Theranostica as new distributor for its unique catalogue of monoclonal antibodies in Israël

17/01/2018

SynAbs is proud to announce strategic deal with successful company Theranostica. Theranostica already distributes major references in the field of monoclonal antibodies and will consequently...
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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SYnAbs/RD Biotech unique expertise in CAR-T cells

14/12/2017

Numbers speak for themselves : 83% of the 63 evaluable children who received tisagenlecleucel in phase 2 trial had complete elimination of malignant cells in just 3 months, while no other...
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SYnAbs, from UCL benches to Singapore

27/11/2017

November 24, 2017 12:00 AM, Guy Dellicour, L’echo The innovative products of the young start-up will be distributed in Singapore, booming biotechnology hub in Asia. Two years after its creation,...
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Health-i Award: The best ideas for the health of tomorrow

15/11/2017

The digitalisation of the health care system is making great strides forward. In order to give further impetus to this trend, the Health-i Award brings together experts from business, science and health. In the MEDICA ECON FORUM by TK three promising start-ups were presented.
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The MEDICA START-UP PARK: spotlight on young companies

14/11/2017

What's UP? This year, a piece of the future of digital health is shown for the first time in the MEDICA START-UP PARK. Here, young companies can present themselves and establish the contacts they need in the world of medicine to promote their innovations.
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Research and diagnostics – laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017

14/11/2017

Whether analysis, evaluation or preparation of samples – the laboratory is the core of every research institute. The work’s efficiency also depends to a large extent on the equipment and items. You can discover the latest trends and developments in laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017. See for yourself!
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Three proofs in one go - Interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG

13/11/2017

Measles, mumps and rubella are usually mentioned in connection with the well-known polyvalent vaccine. Now, a novel DNA test can be used to remedy an unclear situation about an infection. It is supposed to detect all three diseases in just one step. Find out more in our interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG at MEDICA 2017.
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MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13/11/2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08/11/2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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A look at the medicine of tomorrow – At MEDICA Preview in Hamburg

08/11/2017

Every year in September, MEDICA Preview takes place at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf. It is intended to give visitors, exhibitors and the trade press a foretaste of MEDICA in November and tomorrow's medicine. This year, we were on the scene with our camera to learn more about opto genetics, smart hospitals and the support of patients with multiple organ failure.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Point-of-care testing in the hospital – quality diagnostic results

18/10/2017

Point-of-care testing is an integral part of medicine. It enables simple, automated testing that yields fast results. Hospitals have also started to increasingly use POCT diagnostic systems over the past few years. We are guests at the Greifswald University Hospital where patient-side rapid diagnostic tests have already been successfully integrated into daily hospital operations.
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: woman holding a sketch of a human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Molecular Microsystems: Preventing Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

01/08/2017

An increasing percentage of the world population suffers from chronic inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. Acute attacks often lead to a worsening of the disease and considerably reduce the patient’s lung volume. Nine institutes of a research alliance under the Leibniz Institute umbrella are working on technologies designed to predict and thus prevent exacerbations.
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Image: A negative rapid test lying on a sheet of paper; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thegoatman

Point-of-care solutions – uncomplicated and fast

01/08/2017

Point-of-Care solutions are medical rapid tests, which can be carried out in an uncomplicated way in nearly any place and without requiring a lot of time. The samples do not have to be sent to a laboratory but can be analyzed in a hospital, at the doctor's or at the pharmacist's.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Light microscope ChipScope - a glimpse into living cells

14/07/2017

A microscope that is only a few millimeters in size and that can help to consider cell changes in real time. This is the goal of the EU project ChipScope. Scientists led by Dr. Hutomo Wasisto in Braunschweig help to make this project come true.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Three young female scientists work together in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Viktor Cap

Infectious diseases – the laboratory races pathogens

03/04/2017

Infectious diseases come unnoticed and can have severe consequences. Prevention through good hygiene is the best protection for people in hospitals. This is especially necessary for weakened patients whose immune systems are not able to fight back the infections by themselves. When they still fall ill, physicians need to be quick to diagnose and treat them.
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