Articles -- MEDICA Trade Fair

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

Image: red dots on pink background: lipid accumulation in liver tissue; Copyright: Biozentrum, University of Basel

Liver cancer: lipid synthesis promotes tumor formation

15/12/2017

Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells.
Read more
Image: pregnant woman holding her belly; Copyright: panthermedia.net/jukai5

Amniotic fluid is a rich source of stem cells – that can now be harvested

15/12/2017

Amniotic fluid, the protective liquid surrounding an unborn baby, is discarded as medical waste during caesarean section deliveries. However, there is increasing evidence that this fluid is a source of valuable biological material, including stem cells with the potential for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.
Read more
Image: purple luminescent shapes on black background; Copyright: Jacqueline Morris & Jaehee Lee, University of Pennsylvania

First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria

14/12/2017

DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Read more
Image: green structure with pink spots on black background; Copyright: TU Dresden

Novel transcriptomic signature of type 2 diabetic islets identified

13/12/2017

Xenon gas was studied at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Turku University Hospital, Finland in 2009–2014 as a treatment for minimising the damage of cardiac arrest, and now it enters drug development in spring 2018. NeuroproteXeon is advancing the study of xenon in a pivotal phase III trial.
Read more
Image: man in doctor's outfit holding a sign which says

How the cat parasite exploits immune cells to reach the brain

08/12/2017

Scientists have previously shown that a parasite from cats can infect people's brain and affect our behaviour. Now, researchers at Stockholm University have discovered how the parasite takes control of our cells.
Read more
Image: illustration of a human figure surrounded by cells and blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

An anti-aging protein could be targeted to rejuvenate immune cells

05/12/2017

New study explains what happens when the immune system ages.
Read more
Image: signs showing terms related to post-traumatic stress disorder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jacqueline2

Research finds patients with post-traumatic stress disorder respond differently to certain sounds

04/12/2017

Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Amsterdam hope to have found a new neurobiological marker to help recognise patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Read more
Image: human oesophagus with a tumor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Researchers ID bacteria tied to esophageal cancer

04/12/2017

Researchers at NYU Langone Health's Perlmutter Cancer Center report that at least three kinds of bacteria in the mouths of Americans may heighten or lower their risk of developing esophageal cancer.
Read more
Image: red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ras-slava

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system

29/11/2017

A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene –which is expressed in immature blood cells – does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia.
Read more
Image: diagram: interplay between 3D folding of DANN and epigenetic markers in cardiomyocytes; Copyright: Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology

3D folding of DNA provides important epigenetic mechanisms in the formation of cardiac muscle cells

29/11/2017

During differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to cardiomyocytes, the three-dimensional folding of the DNA reorganizes itself. This reorganization of the DNA architecture precedes and defines important epigenetic patterns.
Read more
Image: young man with glasses in profile, with gears and symbols drawn around his head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olly18

Smart people have better connected brains

28/11/2017

Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people's brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study published by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany) supports this assumption.
Read more
Image: breast cance cell; Copyright: University of California San Diego

Researchers discover specific tumor environment that triggers cells to metastasize

28/11/2017

A team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians at the University of California San Diego have discovered how the environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastatic behavior in cancer cells. Specifically, when tumor cells are confined in a dense environment, the researchers found that they turn on a specific set of genes and begin to form structures that resemble blood vessels.
Read more
Image: a row of small glass bottles, in one of them there is a syringe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/NikiLitov

Study opens new avenue in quest to develop TB vaccine

27/11/2017

A team of scientists led by the University of Southampton has taken an important step forward in research efforts that could one day lead to an effective vaccine against the world's deadliest infectious disease.
Read more
Image: soldiers' silhouettes in front of blue sky; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Veneratio

Brain chemistry study shows chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War illness as unique disorders

22/11/2017

Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found distinct molecular signatures in two brain disorders long thought to be psychological - in origin chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Gulf War Illness (GWI).
Read more
Image: head made of gear wheels which starts to dissolve on one side; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer's disease

22/11/2017

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson's disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.
Read more
Image: health workers tend to a patient in one of Sierra Leone's military hospitals; Copyright: Kawaoka Lab, UW-Madison

Unlocking the secrets of Ebola

21/11/2017

Scientists identify biomarkers that indicate likelihood of survival in infected patients.
Read more
Image: a group of running dogs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Madrabothair

Dog ownership linked to lower mortality

21/11/2017

A team of Swedish scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. Their study shows that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or to other causes during the 12-year follow-up.
Read more
Image: the red aids ribbon and a globe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tim Rösner

Understanding the Berlin patient's unexpected cure

20/11/2017

A decade ago, the medical world was shocked when a patient in Berlin, Germany, had been declared free of HIV after receiving a stem cell transplant to treat cancer. Doctors have repeatedly tried to replicate the result, but this HIV cure has evaded other patients so far.
Read more
Image: Patients with no obstructed blood flow in the coronary arteries had higher levels of CXCL5 compared to patients with moderate levels; Copyright: Schisler lab, UNC School of Medicine

Could this protein protect people against coronary artery disease?

20/11/2017

The buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries is an unfortunate part of aging. But by studying the genetic makeup of people who maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers led by UNC's Jonathan Schisler, PhD, have identified a possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease (CAD), as well as potential new opportunities to prevent it.
Read more
Image: Animation of structure of the sorting chip for sorting cells and particles with laser light; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen / aligator kommunikation

Fast Personalized Therapeutic Choices Thanks to the Light-Based Sorting of Biomolecules and Cells

14/11/2017

The "AnaLighter" analyzes and sorts clinically relevant biomolecules and cells in a blood test with light. As a result, physicians can make early diagnoses, for example, of tumor and cardiovascular diseases and initiate patient-specific therapies with great efficacy. Experts from Fraunhofer ILT will be presenting this technology at COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf this week.
Read more
Image: Woman pricking her finger with a blood glucose meter; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

"Women and diabetes – our right to a healthy future" - World Diabetes Day 2017

14/11/2017

The theme of World Diabetes Day 2017 is "Women and diabetes – our right to a healthy future". One in ten women has diabetes worldwide. However, many of them do not have access to treatment, care or education concerning their disease. Furthermore, one in seven pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes.
Read more
Image: Dr. Bobby Thomas, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

New treatment direction sought in Parkinson's by blocking the blocker of a natural protection

13/11/2017

Oxidative stress plays a big role in the brain cell loss that occurs in Parkinson's disease. Now scientists have their sights on a protein that inhibits one of the body's natural protections against it.
Read more
Image: Animation of a clogged artery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/chagpg

Bacterial fats, not dietary ones, may deserve the blame for heart disease

08/11/2017

Heart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, report UConn scientists in the Journal of Lipid Research. The research may explain why gum disease is associated with heart trouble.
Read more
Image: diagram of sulfur respiration; Copyright: Takaaki Akaike

Sulfur respiration in mammals

08/11/2017

A common sulfur metabolite having antioxidant activity appears to be formed with the help of an enzyme found in mitochondria, highlighting a potential area of research for future treatments of various diseases.
Read more
Image: A piece of a meteorit; Copyright: panthermedia.net/njnightsky

Cancer cells destroyed with dinosaur extinction metal

07/11/2017

Cancer cells can be killed with metal from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs, says a new research from University of Warwick UK and Sun-Yat Sen University in China.
Read more
Image: Joanne Kurtzberg, M.D. works with a patient receiving an infusion of cells from umbilical cord blood; Copyright: Shawn Rocco/Duke Health

Umbilical cord blood improves motor skills in some children with cerebral palsy

06/11/2017

An infusion of cells from a child's own umbilical cord blood appears to improve brain connectivity and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy, according to a randomized clinical trial published this week by Stem Cells Translational Medicine.
Read more
Image: Prof. Dr. Irmgard Förster (right) and Prof. Dr. Günter Mayer (left) with their team; Copyright: Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn

New approach for treatment of contact allergy

06/11/2017

An RNA aptamer isolated by scientists at the University of Bonn can effectively prevent allergic reactions in mice.
Read more
Image: Structure of the plasma membrane of a cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

Noisy cell membranes

03/11/2017

Rapid information transfer is vital for the inner workings of body tissues. With computer simulations, researchers from Colombia and Germany found that mechanical pulses travel through membranes for biologically relevant distances at the speed of sound.
Read more
Image: 3D-Animation of a male body and the location of the Gallbladder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Gallbladder cancer: Pharmacist finds protein that drives tumour growth

02/11/2017

A pharmacist from Germany has identified a new pathway that may allow improved prognosis and treatment of Gallbladder cancer. The researcher has discovered a protein that is linked with tumour growth and that functions as a prognostic marker, thus providing an indication of how the cancer may progress.
Read more
Image: 3D render of two connected puzzle pieces with the word diabetes and genetics on them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kagenmi

Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activity

31/10/2017

Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity.
Read more
Image: DNA-string; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo

Suicide molecules kill any cancer cell

31/10/2017

Small RNA molecules originally developed as a tool to study gene function trigger a mechanism hidden in every cell that forces the cell to commit suicide, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer.
Read more
Image: Graphic of how Zinc influences the pH-regulation in the brain; Copyright: Colourbox.com/JP Morth

Research finds that Zinc-binding is vital for regulating pH levels in the brain

27/10/2017

Researchers in Oslo, Norway, have discovered that Zinc-binding plays an important role in the sensing and regulation of pH in the human brain. The findings come as one of the first studies that directly link Zinc-binding with bicarbonate transporters.
Read more
Image: Fluorescence microscopy images of blood vessels supported by perivascular cells; Copyright: Bern University Hospital/University of Bern

Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer

26/10/2017

A study from Bern University Hospital in collaboration with the University of Bern shows that so-called perivascular-like cells from lung tumors behave abnormally. They not only inadequately support vascular structures, but also may actively modulate the inflammatory and immune response. These findings may represent a novel stromal cancer target.
Read more
Image: Missael Garcia and Viktor Gruev; Copyright: L. Brian Stauffer

Mantis shrimp-inspired camera enables glimpse into hidden world

25/10/2017

By mimicking the eye of the mantis shrimp, Illinois researchers have developed an ultra-sensitive camera capable of sensing both color and polarization.
Read more
Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
Read more
Image: young woman sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pressmaster

New insights into how sleep helps the brain to reorganise itself

13/10/2017

A study has given new insights into how sleep contributes to brain plasticity – the ability for our brain to change and reorganise itself – and could pave the way for new ways to help people with learning and memory disorders.
Read more
Image: abstract graphic about hereditary colon cancer; Copyright: IDIBELL

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer

12/10/2017

The finding, once validated by other research groups, could allow patients with mutations in this gene to follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
Read more
Image: illustration of a cancer cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Stanford-led study uncovers mutation that supercharges tumor-suppressor

12/10/2017

Cancer researchers have long hailed p53, a tumor-suppressor protein, for its ability to keep unruly cells from forming tumors. But for such a highly studied protein, p53 has hidden its tactics well.
Read more
Image: cross-section illustration of blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexmit

Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathy

11/10/2017

In oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse.
Read more
Image: proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells; Copyright: Rice University/UTHEALTH

Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many forms

11/10/2017

Rice, UTHealth researchers use light-sensitive molecules to track proteins critical to cell signaling.
Read more
Image: woman holding a pink ribbon to her chest; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tomas_anderson

Genetic targets to chemo-resistant breast cancer identified

10/10/2017

Research led by Dr. Carlos Arteaga, Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, has identified potential targets for treatment of triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
Read more
Image: Immune cells are more activated (red) in the brains of mice with the gene TREM2 (left) than in those without the gene (right); Copyright: DAVID HOLTZMAN LAB

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk and benefits

10/10/2017

Study suggests role of inflammation in brain disease is complicated.
Read more
Image: little boy falling asleep over his laptop; Copyright: panthermedia.net/WavebreakmediaMicro

Why do we fall asleep when bored?

09/10/2017

University of Tsukuba researcher discovers why we have the tendency to fall asleep in the absence of motivating stimuli, when bored.
Read more
Image: microscope image of fluorescent cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vshivkova

New approaches in targeted cancer therapy

06/10/2017

In a large-scale testing procedure, scientists from Cologne University Hospital have explored the effects of more than 1,500 substances on different kinds of cancer cells. The results from this study are a fundamental prerequisite for the development of new therapies for NMC, an aggressive cancer which is often lethal.
Read more
Image: microscopic images of stem cells; Copyright: Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Amount of water in stem cells can determine its fate as fat or bone

05/10/2017

Adding or removing water from a stem cell can change the destiny of the cell, researchers have discovered in a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Read more
Image: clipboard with a diet plan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Brain cells that control appetite identified for first time

04/10/2017

Dieting could be revolutionised, thanks to the ground-breaking discovery by the University of Warwick of the key brain cells which control our appetite.
Read more
Image: blood cells in a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Fresh blood for damaged tissues via alginate hydrogels

29/09/2017

Biomaterial-mediated delivery of blood vessel growth factors could be used as a therapeutic strategy to treat peripheral vascular disease.
Read more
Image: shaking hands of an elderly woman holding a glass of water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid08

Diabetes medicine reduces Parkinson's risk

28/09/2017

A Norwegian study shows that the taking of diabetes medicine reduces the risk of getting Parkinson's disease.
Read more
Image: woman holding a hand to her throat, which is marked red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

New treatment for chronic throat irritation and globus sensation in the gullet

26/09/2017

Chronic throat irritation, a permanent globus sensation, a sore or dry sensation in the throat are common symptoms, which are often trivialised and wrongly attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, these are also the characteristic symptoms of patients suffering from displaced gastric mucosa in the oesophagus (ectopic mucosa).
Read more
Image: electrode next to a cent piece; Copyright: Christian Burkert

Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness

26/09/2017

Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing.
Read more
Image: Zebrafish β-cells labeled using the Beta-bow system; Copyright: Ninov lab

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

25/09/2017

Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden (PLID), and his group developed a system called "Beta-bow", which allows the history of β-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging.
Read more
Image: cross section through a healthy bone above cross section of a bone with osteoporosis ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Roberto_Biasini

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss

25/09/2017

This knowledge can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss therapeutics to treat osteoporosis.
Read more
Image: model of a human brain with luminous areas; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pixologic

Drugs in disguise heal the brain

22/09/2017

The treatment of brain diseases is on the verge of a breakthrough. Researchers from Aalborg University are developing a new method that 'smuggles' medicine past the brain's defense systems, giving hope that diseases such as Alzheimer's can one day be cured.
Read more
Image: image of how Taxanes induce tripolar instead of normal bipolar cell division; Copyright: Munich University Hospital

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

21/09/2017

Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action – and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
Read more
Image: illustration of the human immune system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ralwel

Immune cells help fat deal with environmental challenges

20/09/2017

Immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells play an important role in the functioning of adipose tissue. This is the discovery of scientists from the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Their findings are published in the journal 'Cell Metabolism'.
Read more
Image: viruses on black background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/frenta

A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection

19/09/2017

To fight infections cells in the immune system play a dangerous game with their own genes. Damaging genes allows B cells to make antibodies that are specifically equipped to target to specific causes of illness, but damaging genes also puts them at risk of becoming cancerous.
Read more
Image: Comparison of normal vs hepatoblastoma liver tissue; Copyright: Etienne Meylan/EPFL

Metabolism can be used to subtype hepatoblastoma tumors

19/09/2017

Looking at cell metabolism instead of histology, EPFL scientists have identified new biomarkers that could help more accurately classify the two main subtypes of hepatoblastoma, a children liver cancer. Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric liver cancer, usually diagnosed in the first three years of life.
Read more
Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
Read more
Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
Read more
Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
Read more
Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
Read more
Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
Read more
Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
Read more
Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
Read more
Photo: pipette in petri dish

Great leaps forward thanks to new methods

01/02/2016

Self-healing powers like a superhero on the big screen? That’s the aim of regenerative medicine; at least in a very broad sense. This promising field of biomedicine is currently highly dynamic with innovative technologies and development. New methods are designed to help propel medicine into a whole new sphere.
Read more
Photo: child with broken arm

Different specialties, one goal – treating children right

01/02/2016

Children, especially newborns, are generally no longer simply considered to be small adults whose treatment just needs to be "reduced". This is why a pediatrician’s education includes several specialties because ultimately everything in terms of care comes together here.
Read more

From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
Read more

Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
Read more
Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
Read more
Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
Read more

Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
Read more

Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
Read more
Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
Read more

Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
Read more

Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
Read more

Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
Read more

"We don’t know why certain pharmaceuticals bind especially well while others bind barely at all"

10/02/2014

Prof. Joachim Heberle from the Free University of Berlin wants to make the smallest protein structures visible under the microscope. He wants to accomplish this with an infrared microscope, originating in the field of physics. He told MEDICA.de which technology is behind all this and what he also wants to examine with it in the future.
Read more

Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
Read more

"The immunosensory system goes beyond the actual immune cells"

22/01/2014

It guards the body but can become its enemy: the immune system defends us from intruding pathogens; it is also able to cause severe diseases if it falsely recognizes the body itself as a threat. Molecular receptors in the whole body enable the immune system to “sense” what happens within.
Read more