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Image: bionic hand; Copyright: Luca Rossini

A prosthetic that restores the sense

22/02/2019

Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study, which have been published in Science Robotics, are the culmination of ten years of robotics research.
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Image: Grey shaded images of a human's vascular system; Copyright: Kim C, Lee JS, Han Y, et al.

Imaging: PET/CT agent promises better VTE diagnosis

20/02/2019

A first-in-human study featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine reports that the novel positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) tracer 18F-GP1 showed excellent image quality and a high detection rate for the diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE).
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Image: Physician talks to a patient who puts her flat hand on her ribcage; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Electronic tool to improve asthma care

15/02/2019

A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada.
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Image: Big Data; Copyright: panthermedia.net / putilich

Big data approach evaluates autism treatments

08/02/2019

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
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Image: robotik hand with stetoskope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / VitalikRadko

Gummy-like robots prevent disease

08/02/2019

Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury. The controlled application of such stimuli to living tissues in vivo and in vitro has now proven instrumental to studying the conditions that lead to disease.
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Image: PSI researchers are first to transfer state-of-the-art microscopy method to X-ray imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Romaset

Virtual lens improves X-ray microscopy

07/02/2019

X-rays provide unique insights into the interior of materials, tissues, and cells. Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method that makes X-ray images even better: The resolution is higher and allows more precise inferences about the properties of materials.
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Image: brain with syringe and medication; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Michael Osterrieder

Breakthrough for brain tumor drug development

07/02/2019

24,000 patients are diagnosed with brain tumors every year with the 5yr survival for high grade glioblastomas (GBM) only 5%, with median survival of 15 months. These poor statistics have remained static for 30 years due in part to a lack of preclinical models for testing new drugs.
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Image: new app for eating habits and physical activity; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ stokkete

New app for eating habits and physical activity

06/02/2019

Excess weight and obesity are two global health issues. According to data of the World Health Organisation (WHO), over 50% of the European population is overweight and 20% is obese. In Spain, the situation is similar: in the last 30 years, obesity among adults has increased. More than half the adult population (54.5%) is overweight.
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Image: Learning tranistor mimics human brain; Copyright: Thor Balkhed

Learning transistor mimics the brain

06/02/2019

A new transistor based on organic materials has been developed by scientists at Linköping University. It has the ability to learn, and is equipped with both short-term and long-term memory. The work is a major step on the way to creating technology that mimics the human brain.
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Image: Artificial intelligence-tool; Copyright: Nature/Nigam Shah, Adrien Coulet

Artificial intelligence-tool for chemotherapy dosages

05/02/2019

Finding the right dose of medication by trial and error can be a painful experience for patients. Thanks to a new algorithm created by Adrien Coulet, lecturer at the Université de Lorraine and researcher in a joint Inria and Loria team, in collaboration with researchers from Stanford University, an innovative tool can predict in advance whether patients will need a lower dose of medication.
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Image: cancer growing inside the pancreatic duct of a mouse; Copyright: Hendrik Massal, Francis Crick Institute

3D imaging technique reveals pancreatic cancers start

05/02/2019

A new technique to study tissue samples in 3D has revealed that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, solving a decades-old mystery of how tumours form. The new method could help researchers to get more information from tissue biopsies and may lead to improved treatments for pancreatic cancers. The technique was developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute.
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Image: microvessel-on-a-chip; Copyright: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

04/02/2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
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Image: Doctor AIzimov – an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics; Copyright: Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University

New intelligent system for lung cancer diagnostics

04/02/2019

Researches from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Russian Academic Excellence Initiative participant, in collaboration with the radiologists from St.Petersburg Clinical Research for Specialized Types of Medical Care have developed an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics. It analyzes patients' computed tomography (CT) results within 20 seconds.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22/01/2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: view in a café with many talking teens; Copyright: Oticon

AI makes life easier for hearing aid users

15/01/2019

For people with hearing loss it can be very difficult to understand and separate voices in noisy environments. This problem may soon be history thanks to a new groundbreaking algorithm that is designed to recognize and separate voices efficiently in unknown sound environments.
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Image: robot hand and human hand are going to shake hands in front of a laptop; Copyright: MedUni Vienna

Bionic reconstruction after amputation of a hand

15/01/2019

Modern prostheses offer patients who have had a hand amputated much greater capability in everyday life than was possible with previous prosthetic reconstructive techniques. Redundant nerves from the amputated extremity can be surgically transferred to provide a much better connection between the patient’s body and the prosthesis.
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Image: index finger of a hand points to a printed text; Copyright: panthermedia.net / j.dudzinski

AI approach outperformed experts in identifying cervical precancer

11/01/2019

A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has developed a computer algorithm that can analyze digital images of a woman's cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention. This artificial intelligence (AI) approach, called automated visual evaluation.
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Image: Stethoscope wraps alarm clock on wooden table; Copyright: panthermedia.net / mattkusb

Tiny digital 'tags' improve eye care by tracking every step

10/01/2019

Called radio-frequency identification (or RFID), the tool helps streamline operations by knowing where everything is and where everything goes. It can help a large store maintain a clearer picture of inventory counts, for example. At the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, RFID serves another purpose: to track and reduce patient wait time and enhance time spent at the doctor's office.
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Image: esophageal tumors; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

Mapping residual esophageal tumors - a glimpse into the future?

10/01/2019

It's one of the first questions asked by many cancer patients "What are my chances of beating this?" Often there is no clear answer, with survival rates differing widely. Post-operative testing that provides an accurate prediction of long-term treatment outcomes is the next best thing, allowing clinicians to plan further treatment and more accurately inform patients about their prognoses.
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Image: Killer T cells attack an infectious cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Andreus

How herpesviruses shape the immune system

09/01/2019

Cytomegalovirus is widespread and remains in the body for a lifetime after infection. In healthy individuals, this virus is usually kept in check but can become dangerous when the immune system is weakened or during pregnancy. DZIF scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
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Image: The Digital Precision Cancer Medicine Platform; Copyright: University of Helsinki

Digital health to support precision cancer medicine in iCAN

09/01/2019

The Academy of Finland has selected the "iCAN Digital Precision Cancer Medicine" competence cluster as one of Finland's six flagships. The iCAN public-private partnership forms a platform aiming to improve the treatment of cancer patients and to support innovations coming from high quality research.
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Image: MRSA-Text on the keyboard on which lies a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / masuti

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks

08/01/2019

A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08/01/2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Philip Miller with the new microneedle technique; Copyright: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories

Microneedles technique for quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

08/01/2019

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw - usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle - might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, according to new research.
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Image: Label-free intraoperative nonlinear imaging of the tumor microenvironment; Copyright: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

07/01/2019

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Prof. Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room by using a new portable optical imaging system. This work marks a major step toward providing cancer researchers with a tool for tracking tumor progression.
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Image: breath test for multiple cancers; Copyright: Owlstone Medical Ltd

Clinical trial launches to develop breath test for multiple cancers

07/01/2019

Researchers have launched a clinical trial to develop a breath test, analysing molecules that could indicate the presence of cancer at an early stage. This is the first test of its kind to investigate multiple cancer types.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Schematic model of ChIL reaction; Copyright: Yuko Sato (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

When less is more: Approach for low-cell-number epigenomic profiling

14/12/2018

Scientists at Kyushu University and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a technique that enables analysis of DNA-protein interactions using very small numbers of cells, ranging from 100 to 1,000. Their method could capture previously unexamined epigenomic information, facilitate biomarker discovery and open new avenues for precision medicine.
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Image: Systic fibrosis treatment; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Ibrfzhjpf.gmail.com

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment

14/12/2018

Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each patient's precise biology.
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Image: Interferometric microscope equipped with a high-speed camera; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Viktor Cap

Technology that sees nerve cells fire

13/12/2018

Researchers at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.
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 Image: anatomy, muscles of a human being; Copyright: panthermedia.net / stihii

Promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab

13/12/2018

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle. Findings appeared in Cell Reports.
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Image: patient and doctor during mammography; Copyright: panthermedia.net / luminastock

Digital mammography increases breast cancer detection

12/12/2018

The shift from film to digital mammography increased the detection of breast cancer by 14 percent overall in the United Kingdom without increasing the recall rate, according to a major new study.
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Image: New deformable particle model; Copyright: Mark Shattuck, CCNY

Shape shifting cell breakthrough

12/12/2018

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.
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Image: whole-brain activity map; Copyright: iob.ch

Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior

11/12/2018

In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska’s group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors. The non-invasive technology has promising applications for ophthalmologic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases.
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Image: microscopic images of cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / raspirator

Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system

11/12/2018

Osaka University researchers have developed a system using artificial intelligence that can automatically differentiate between different types of cancer cell.
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Image: doctor and brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / rfphoto

PET scans to optimize tuberculosis meningitis treatments

10/12/2018

Tuberculosis of the brain - or tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) - is often deadly, always hard to treat, and a particular threat to young children. It may leave survivors with lifelong brain damage. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have used PET scans, a rabbit model and the TB drug rifampin to advance physicians' understanding of this disease.
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Image: Hand of a robot; Copyright: panthermedia.net / VitalikRadko

World's first robotic bilateral breast reconstruction

10/12/2018

A team of surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first in the world to use a surgical robot to assist with a bilateral free flap breast reconstruction - a procedure in which tissue is taken from the lower abdomen and used to rebuild the breast. The robot allows surgeons to make a much smaller incision into the abdominal wall muscles.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03/12/2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03/12/2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03/12/2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: smart medical device; Copyright: NTU Singapore

Medical device for early intervention of congestive heart failure

30/11/2018

A research team from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) have invented a smart handheld medical device that could enable early intervention for patients with congestive heart failure.
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Image: Sensitive MRI diagnostics; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Arne Trautmann

Sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to "elastic" contrast media

30/11/2018

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. An “elastic” protein structure can absorb dissolved xenon in a self-regulating way: The greater the amount of this noble gas, the higher the quality of the image.
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Image: MRI post ablation; Copyright: Radiological Society of North America

Cryoablation shows promise in treating low-risk breast cancers

29/11/2018

Cryoablation-the destruction of cancer cells through freezing-shows early indications of effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancers, according to research being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Researchers said that over the four years of the study, there has only been one case of cancer recurrence out of 180 patients.
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Image: LION LBD; Copyright: panthermedia.net / HASLOO

AI system may accelerate search for cancer discoveries

29/11/2018

Searching through the mountains of published cancer research could be made easier for scientists, thanks to a new AI system.
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Image: Brainwaves; Copyright: panthermedia.net / drnn

Imaging technology measures magnetite levels in the brain

28/11/2018

Investigators at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) - a technology that measures brain activity by detecting the weak magnetic fields produced by the brain's normal electrical currents - to measure levels of the iron-based mineral called magnetite in the human brain.
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 Image: muscles; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Florea Paul

Microscope measures muscle weakness

28/11/2018

Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous.
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Image: Thymus; Copyright: panthermedia.net / CLIPAREA

Researchers develop new surgical technique for studying the thymus

27/11/2018

Elisa Oltra, head of the Genetic Exppression and Immunity group of the Faculty of Medicine at the Catholic University of Valencia (UCV), in collaboration with Alejandro Caicedo, professor of the Department of Medicine of the University of Miami, have developed a surgical process which makes it possible to place functional fragments of the thymus in the anterior chamber of the eyes of mice.
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Image: Participant in the BrainGate clinical trial controls a tablet computer; Copyright: BrainGate Collaboration

Brain-computer interface for people with paralysis

27/11/2018

Tablets and other mobile computing devices are part of everyday life, but using them can be difficult for people with paralysis. New research from the BrainGate* consortium shows that a brain-computer interface (BCI) can enable people with paralysis to directly operate an off-the-shelf tablet device just by thinking about making cursor movements and clicks.
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Image: Darmkrebs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Sebastian Kaulitzki

Screening for colorectal cancer spares intense treatments

26/11/2018

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the world. Every year in Finland, approximately 3,000 new cases are diagnosed, and roughly 1,200 patients die of it. Between 2004 and 2016, an extensive screening programme was conducted in Finland, intending to study the potential benefits and downsides of a nation-wide screening for colorectal cancer.
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Image: Doctor on a computer display examines RNA-sequences; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

New technique improves single cell RNA sequencing

26/11/2018

In the era of personalized medicine, scientists are using new genetic and genomic insights to help them determine the best treatment for a given patient. In the case of cancer, the first step toward these treatments is an investigation into how tumor cells behave in an effort to figure out the best drugs to use to attack them.
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Image: One presses on screen with security key; Copyright: panthermedia.net/welcomia

Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02/11/2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: Robots and Artificial Intelligence; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sdecoret

"Dr. Algorithm suggests the best treatment option"

02/11/2018

The technology of the 20th century is progressing faster than ever – and this also applies to technology in the field of medicine. That’s why it is only a matter of time before hospitals are fully driven by artificial intelligence - data-driven medicine that suggests the best treatment and facilitates zero error surgeries. A path that doesn’t just require openness!
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01/10/2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08/06/2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01/02/2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: Computer keyboard where one key has been replaced by the CE symbol with the flag of the EU; Copyright: panthermedia.net/NiroDesign

When is a medical device considered to be a medical device? – Certification, norms, and standards

01/12/2017

To ensure product quality and patient safety, medical devices must meet specific requirements outlined in the Medical Devices Act and specified EU directives. Yet which norms and standards must actually be met and how is this verified?
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Image: A large stone is blocking a path that leads through a green meadow; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brigitte Götz

Medical devices: the road to the finished product is not easy

08/09/2017

These days, many groups make various demands of medical device developers: manufacturers, users, patients and government agencies. Given all of these interests and concerns, the developers face many challenges. In this interview, we put some of them under the microscope and examine how they can be sidestepped or entirely avoided.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01/09/2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03/07/2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03/07/2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: Man typing on virtual question marks; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sebastien decoret

FAQ: Some questions concerning India

02/05/2017

There are recurring questions that companies are seeking to invest or produce in India. Here are some questions and their answers.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01/02/2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
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Image: Single room with a window in a hospital; Copyright: panthermedia.net/epstock

Hospital construction: infection prevention through architecture?

09/01/2017

Hospitals apply many infection prevention and control measures. They all have one thing in common: they are individual parts of an overall concept that is aimed at preventing the spread of highly infectious and resistant pathogens in hospitals. Nevertheless, previous hygiene concepts ignore one aspect of hospitals: the architecture of the actual hospital facility itself.
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