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Image: Big Data; Copyright: panthermedia.net / putilich

Big data approach evaluates autism treatments

08/02/2019

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
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Image: microvessel-on-a-chip; Copyright: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

04/02/2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
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Image: Schematical drawing to explain a blood test; Copyright: NHLBI

Can a blood test detect lung-transplant rejection?

29/01/2019

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident.
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Image: A girl balances a pink fidget spinner at the tip of her finger; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Fidget spinner separates blood plasma

28/01/2019

Some people use fidget spinners - flat, multi-lobed toys with a ball bearing at the center - to diffuse nervous energy or whirl away stress. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for the toys: separating blood plasma for diagnostic tests.
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Image: A man and a woman in the laboratory; Copyright:A. Battenberg / TUM

Evolution of signaling molecules

24/01/2019

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.
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Image: black-white-photo of an old woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ photographee eu

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

23/01/2019

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease manifest, the brain starts changing and neurons are slowly degraded.
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Image: blood vessel system in bones; Copyright: UDE/Matthias Gunzer, Annika Grüneboom

New blood vessel system discovered in bones

23/01/2019

A previously unknown network of fine capillaries directly connecting the bone marrow with the circulation of the periosteum has been discovered.
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Image: Healthy mucus layer (red) keeping Escherichia coli (green) at a safe distance within the colon, preventing them from breaking throug; Copyright: Bahtiyar Yilmaz, University of Bern

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

22/01/2019

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.
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Image: man having a heart attack; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kzenon

Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

21/01/2019

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.
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Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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Image: 3D-printed absorber for endovascular treatment of liver cancer; Copyright: UCSF graphic

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

11/01/2019

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.
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Image: Philip Miller with the new microneedle technique; Copyright: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories

Microneedles technique for quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

08/01/2019

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw - usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle - might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, according to new research.
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Image: A child lying on a bench.; Copyright: Hubert Vuagnat

Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease

20/12/2018

Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions, disabilities and stigmatisation. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects.
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Image: On the left, an expanded human cell with microtubules (blue) and a pair of centrioles (yellow-red) in the middle; Copyright: Fabian Zwettler / University of Würzburg

Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy

19/12/2018

Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures? That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably.
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Image: Closeup of bacterial cells.  Credit: National Institutes of Health

New RNA sequencing strategy provides insight into microbiomes

18/12/2018

Tools allow scientists to understand the activity of naturally occurring microbiomes in response to real-world conditions and diet
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Image: Arrow shows a coronary artery captured in slow-flow; Credit:Mehta HH, Morris M, Fischman DL, Finley JJ, Ruggiero N, Walinsky P, McCarey M, Savage MP. The Spontaneous Coronary Slow-Flow Phenomen

Treatment for underdiagnosed cause of debilitating chest pain

18/12/2018

Researchers find an effective way to treat an underdiagnosed condition that can cause heart attack and heart-attack-like symptoms.
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Image: A collagen fibril mounted on a MEMS mechanical testing device. At the bottom is a single human hair for size comparison; Credit: University of Illinois Department of Aerospace Engineering

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

17/12/2018

Collagen is the fundamental building block of muscles, tissues, tendons, and ligaments in mammals. It is also widely used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. Although scientists have a good understanding about how it behaves at the tissue-level, some key mechanical properties of collagen at the nanoscale still remain elusive.
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Image: Systic fibrosis treatment; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Ibrfzhjpf.gmail.com

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment

14/12/2018

Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each patient's precise biology.
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Image: How graphene can be used; Copyright: Berry Research Laboratory, UIC

Using graphene to detect ALS

06/12/2018

The wonders of graphene are numerous. Now, the "supermaterial" may one day be used to test for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS – a progressive, neurodegenerative disease which is diagnosed mostly by ruling out other disorders, according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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Image: Rob Mannino (right),Wilbur Lam (left); Copyright: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech

No bleeding required: anemia detection via smartphone

05/12/2018

Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app for the non-invasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone's fingernails taken on a smartphone to accurately measure how much hemoglobin is in their blood.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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