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Image: Animation of structure of the sorting chip for sorting cells and particles with laser light; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen / aligator kommunikation

Fast Personalized Therapeutic Choices Thanks to the Light-Based Sorting of Biomolecules and Cells

14/11/2017

The "AnaLighter" analyzes and sorts clinically relevant biomolecules and cells in a blood test with light. As a result, physicians can make early diagnoses, for example, of tumor and cardiovascular diseases and initiate patient-specific therapies with great efficacy. Experts from Fraunhofer ILT will be presenting this technology at COMPAMED 2017 in Düsseldorf this week.
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Image: Joanne Kurtzberg, M.D. works with a patient receiving an infusion of cells from umbilical cord blood; Copyright: Shawn Rocco/Duke Health

Umbilical cord blood improves motor skills in some children with cerebral palsy

06/11/2017

An infusion of cells from a child's own umbilical cord blood appears to improve brain connectivity and motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy, according to a randomized clinical trial published this week by Stem Cells Translational Medicine.
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Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
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Image: cross-section illustration of blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexmit

Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathy

11/10/2017

In oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse.
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Image: clipboard with a diet plan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Brain cells that control appetite identified for first time

04/10/2017

Dieting could be revolutionised, thanks to the ground-breaking discovery by the University of Warwick of the key brain cells which control our appetite.
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Photo: A physician is taking a blood test from an elderly man; Copyright: Lancaster University

Breakthrough study reveals new diagnosis for Alzheimer's

04/10/2017

In the largest and most conclusive study of its kind, researchers have analysed blood samples to create a novel and non-invasive way of helping to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and distinguishing between different types of neurodegenerative disorders.
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Image: blood cells in a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Fresh blood for damaged tissues via alginate hydrogels

29/09/2017

Biomaterial-mediated delivery of blood vessel growth factors could be used as a therapeutic strategy to treat peripheral vascular disease.
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Image: heaps of vegetables, one hand holding a blood glucose meter; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dml5050

Biomarkers in the blood prove strong role of food for type 2 diabetes

18/09/2017

A pioneering method, developed at Chalmers University of Technology, has demonstrated its potential in a large study, showing that metabolic fingerprints from blood samples could render important new knowledge on the connection between food and health. The study finds that diet is one of the strongest predictors of type 2 diabetes risk in older women.
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Image: Breast cancer stem cell line 1 (BCSC1) from the newly established cell model; Copyright: Maurer Lab

Researchers found a possible new treatment for aggressive triple receptor-negative breast cancer

18/09/2017

Scientists from the cluster of excellence BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies at the University of Freiburg and the Freiburg University Medical Center have shown that inhibiting the epigenetic regulator KDM4 might offer a potential novel treatment option for breast cancer patients.
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Image: cross-section of a blood vessel; copyright: panthermedia.net/Dr. Lange

Correlation between height and risk of thrombosis

14/09/2017

In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers investigated the risk factors for blood clots, i.e. venous thromboembolism (VTE). The results show a strong correlation between height and VTE risk for both women and men. The risk increases with height.
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Image: red blood cells; copyright: panthermedia.net/forsaken-art

Study identifies multiple roles of glucose metabolism in platelet activation and survival

14/09/2017

Research may inform how increased glucose metabolism may contribute to the increased risk of thrombosis in diabetes and how altering platelet glucose metabolism influences platelet function
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Image: venes and arteries; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Spectral

How new blood vessels sprout

11/09/2017

IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.
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Image: sheet of paper with the word cancer on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stanciuc

From bed to bench and back to bed: Mimicking how HPV-positive cancer responds to treatment

11/09/2017

Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who are positive for human papilloma virus (HPV-positive) have been observed to respond significantly better to chemo-radiotherapy than HPV-negative patients. This observation is surprising because HPV infection leads to an increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer. To date, the reason for this dichotomy has not been well understood.
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Image: a sleeping newborn; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mschlake

The brains of newborns distinguish between caresses

25/08/2017

The ability to distinguish between different kinds of caresses on the skin already exists at a very early age. This is evident from a study by the Sahlgrenska Academy, in which the blood supply in brains of infants 6 to 10 weeks old was investigated.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ MihaPstock

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Graphic of the operation

Filling bone defects – replacement tissue with its own blood supply

01/02/2016

First grow tissue in the lab, then insert it into patients when they need it and you’re done! Unfortunately, things are not as easy as people hoped at the onset of “tissue engineering”. Although robust tissues for bone defects can be grown in a petri dish, for example, they unfortunately quickly die off again inside the body if there is no corresponding nutrient supply.
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Photo: child with broken arm

Different specialties, one goal – treating children right

01/02/2016

Children, especially newborns, are generally no longer simply considered to be small adults whose treatment just needs to be "reduced". This is why a pediatrician’s education includes several specialties because ultimately everything in terms of care comes together here.
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Photo: pipette in petri dish

Great leaps forward thanks to new methods

01/02/2016

Self-healing powers like a superhero on the big screen? That’s the aim of regenerative medicine; at least in a very broad sense. This promising field of biomedicine is currently highly dynamic with innovative technologies and development. New methods are designed to help propel medicine into a whole new sphere.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Ebola test

Ebola: detection strips instead of lab tests

04/01/2016

When infectious diseases such as Ebola break out, a rapid diagnosis is important because the early detection of a virus along with the right hygiene measures can prevent its continued spread. However, laboratories and skilled personnel are not available everywhere. Low-cost and portable detection strips can bring relief.
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Graphic: stent in a blood vessel

Mechanical thrombectomy: stroke treatment 2.0

01/12/2015

Each year, approximately 250,000 Germans suffer a stroke. This makes stroke the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. The circulatory disorder that occurs in the brain is normally treated using systemic thrombolysis, a procedure that bears various risks. Unlike mechanical thrombectomy, which offers clear advantages by comparison.
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Wanted: rapid test to prevent deep vein thrombosis

01/07/2015

Deep vein thrombosis is not just a risk factor for frequent flyers but also for wearers of cardiovascular implants and newly operated patients. Blood thinners prevent these dangerous blood clots from forming, but they need to be carefully adjusted and do not work the same way in every patient. A detailed analysis of platelets (thrombocytes) could prevent complications in the future.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Photo: Blue box at optical bench

Continuous glucose monitoring: "Our method is based on the principles of infrared photometry"

22/10/2014

Patients in intensive care units do not just have to struggle with the consequences of a severe injury or disease – they are also subject to acute glucose fluctuations that compromise the healing success. These sometimes happen so quickly that they cannot be caught in time with existing discrete measurement methods.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Vascular health in athletes

02/06/2014

"Sports are good for your health", as the saying goes. Regular exercise promotes the health of our blood vessels and prevents vascular diseases. However, many years of competitive sports can also have negative effects on vascular health and increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Prof. Martin Halle of the Technical University Munich explains at MEDICA.de what athletes need to pay attention to.
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