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Image: A woman putting her hands on both sides of her throat, having pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ryanking999

MicroRNA panel identifies malignancy in thyroid nodules

30/07/2018

A panel of 19 microRNAs identified using next-generation sequencing could categorize indeterminate thyroid nodule samples into malignant and benign. The study was Published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Image: diagram for high-throughput flow cytometry in drug discovery; Copyright: Alexandre Chigaev, University of New Mexico

High-throughput flow cytometry in drug discovery

27/07/2018

A new special issue of SLAS Discovery reflects examples of the recent groundswell of creative new applications for high-throughput flow cytometry (HTFC) in drug discovery.
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Image: Illustration of graphene-based SNP detection chip wirelessly transmitting signal to a smartphone; Copyright: Lal et al.

Biosensor chip detects genetic mutation

19/07/2018

A team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and send the results in real time to a smartphone, computer, or other electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology.
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Image: smiling man in a suit; Copyright: L. Brian Stauffer

New informatics tool makes the most of genomic data

16/07/2018

The rise of genomics, the shift from considering genes singly to collectively, is adding a new dimension to medical care; biomedical researchers hope to use the information contained in human genomes to make better predictions about individual health, including responses to therapeutic drugs.
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Image: three brain scans of two different brains; Copyright: Lutz Jäncke, UZH

MRI reveals: Every person has a unique brain anatomy

12/07/2018

Like with fingerprints, no two people have the same brain anatomy, a study by researchers of the University of Zurich has shown. This uniqueness is the result of a combination of genetic factors and individual life experiences.
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Image: look over the shoulder of a female researcher at a computer; Copyright: CRG

Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes

11/07/2018

Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work, which is published in Nature Communications, is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publically available data.
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Image: In vitro time course reflecting clinical evolution of cetuximab response and evolution of acquired resistance; Copyright: Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center

Computer algorithm maps cancer resistance to drugs

05/07/2018

New methods of studying the evolution of treatment resistance in head and neck cancer are being developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. The scientists wanted to examine how cancers acquire resistance to treatment over time and whether those changes could be modeled computationally to determine patient-specific timelines of resistance.
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Image: scientists in the laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pressmaster

Predicting heart disease risk with gene editing technology

26/06/2018

Scientists may now be able to predict whether carrying a specific genetic variant increases a person's risk for disease using gene editing and stem cell technologies, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.
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Image: proteins in the nuclear pore complex; Copyright: California Institute of Technology

How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass through

22/06/2018

New structural details emerge about one of the body's biggest protein assemblages, the nuclear pore complex.
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Image: a woman standing on a scale saying

Study offers new hope for the fight against genetically determined obesity

20/06/2018

Around two to six per cent of all people with obesity develop obesity already in early childhood; it's in their genetic cards. Obesity-causal mutations in one of their "appetite genes" gives them a strong genetic predisposition for developing obesity, also called monogenic obesity. Their experience of hunger is overruling and their feeling of satiety limited.
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Image: scientist in the laboratory; Copyright: 2018 KAUST

The long and the short of DNA replication

14/06/2018

An unexpectedtwo-step mechanism occurs when cells copy DNA.
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Image: Professor Dougu Nam and his research team in the School of Life Sciences at UNIST; Copyright: UNIST

New method for finding disease-susceptibility genes

07/06/2018

A new study, affiliated with UNIST has recently presented a novel statistical algorithm, capable of identifying potential disease genes in a more accurate and cost-effective way. This algorithm has also been considered as a new promising approach for the identification of candidate disease genes, as it works effectively with less genomic data and takes only a minute or two to get results.
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Image: two MRI scans of a heart; Copyright: Imperial College of London

New link found between alcohol, genes and heart failure

07/06/2018

The researchers investigated faulty versions of a gene called titin which are carried by one in 100 people or 600,000 people in the UK. Titin is crucial for maintaining the elasticity of the heart muscle, and faulty versions are linked to a type of heart failure called dilated cardiomyopathy.
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Image: illustration of two mice, one with a walking stick; Copyright: Kerstin Wagner / FLI

Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found

04/06/2018

Aging is associated with an increase in frailty and age related-diseases. A calorie-restricted diet is known to alleviate these age-related conditions. Researchers from the ERIBA in Groningen, Netherlands, and the FLI in Jena, Germany, now demonstrate in a mouse model that the C/EBPß-LIP gene regulator is involved in the aging process.
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Image: needle, urine sample and blood sample; Copyright: Christian Urban, Kiel University

Cancer diagnosis: no more needles?

04/06/2018

Urine is an everyday liquid which most people pay little attention to and regard as rather unpleasant. It’s quite the opposite for a group of clinical researchers from Kiel University, the University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH) and the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences in Kaunas, who are convinced of the diagnostic potential of this yellowish liquid.
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Image: chemical structure of furanosteroids-Structures of wortmannin and viridin; Copyright: The University of Tokyo

Identification of biosynthetic pathway for the steroids with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition activity

25/05/2018

A group of researchers from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences at The University of Tokyo and Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products at Jinan University, identified the biosynthetic gene cluster for the furanosteroid demethoxyviridin, and deciphered its biosynthetic pathway.
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Image: illustration of DNA strings; Copyright: pixabay.com

The dark side of our genes – healthy ageing in modern times

24/05/2018

The transition to modernity – largely driven by the Industrial Revolution – provided us with easier access to food and clean water, with antibiotics, vaccines, and modern medicine. Yet modernity did not just bring fewer infectious diseases and longer life: it also created an environment radically different from the one we evolved in.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Image: Children playing outside, getting wet in the water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08/03/2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Photo: Large metal device with a pink glowing window in the fron

Plasmasterilization: active ingredient cocktail to fight bacteria

01/06/2016

Until now, plasma, the fourth state of matter,was consideredfascinatingonly to astrophysicists and science fiction fans. But at this point, it also attracts the interest of medicine because plasma can have many uses in this field. In the future, plasma sterilization could become an important component of hospital hygiene-provided that the right device is being used.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?

08/04/2016

A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Photo: DNA section

Human Genetics: "Physicians should be able to counsel patients on the process"

01/04/2016

Human genetics is the study of the genetic makeup of human beings. DNA, chromosomes, and genes are extensively analyzed by medical specialists. Physicians of Germany need to have a qualification in genetic counseling to successfully advise patients.
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Vascular health in athletes

02/06/2014

"Sports are good for your health", as the saying goes. Regular exercise promotes the health of our blood vessels and prevents vascular diseases. However, many years of competitive sports can also have negative effects on vascular health and increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Prof. Martin Halle of the Technical University Munich explains at MEDICA.de what athletes need to pay attention to.
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