Articles -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: View into a cockpit over the shoulders of the pilots; Copyright:

Intensive care medicine: More safety thanks to aviation knowledge


What do intensive care medicine and aviation have in common? In both fields, mistakes can quickly put people's lives at risk. That's why high safety standards should be a matter of course for both. Having said that, medicine lags behind by comparison because staff members often lack the opportunities to train for emergency situations and the proper tools to prevent patients from being harmed.
Read more
Image: A physician is holding a globe in his hands; Copyright:

Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response


After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
Read more
Image: A hand tips on a lying tablet; Copyright: / Koson Rattanaphan

Project A.L.I.N.A: Training in the interdisciplinary emergency room


How can emergency room associates continue to educate themselves in a fast manner and without bureaucratic hurdles? The A.L.I.N.A Project, which gives associates new tools with special assistance services and learning environments, delivers the solution. We spoke with Prof. Sabine Blaschke at the University Hospital Göttingen about these tools and how they work.
Read more
Image: Blurred image of hospital employees who run along a corridor; Copyright:

Medical emergency management in hospitals: there is a need for action


Emergency situations do not just occur outside the hospital - life-threatening situations can also take place in patient rooms. Aside from the intensive care units, this also pertains to general hospital wards, where patients are not as closely monitored. Nursing staffs need to pay special attention in this case because emergencies sometimes announce themselves with certain symptoms.
Read more
Graphic: Hand holds a smartphone, four pictures in the background with rescue situations

Emergency: app alerts first responders


Just a few minutes can make the difference between life and death when a person loses consciousness or goes into sudden cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, emergency medical services cannot always be on location as fast as needed. To ensure immediate life-sustaining measures, the "mobile rescue" app was developed, which alerts emergency medical responders in the immediate vicinity of an emergency.
Read more
Photo: white jeep

Rapid Tests: valuable helpers for use in the field


Infectious diseases are widespread in conflict areas. When basic medical care is lacking on location, people cannot be appropriately treated. Laboratory tests are limited in the field. Rapid diagnostic tests make it possible for medical personnel to quickly and accurately test patients for several infectious diseases, for instance for the presence of malaria or HIV infection.
Read more

Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“


How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
Read more

Football: "We want to globally determine deaths for the first time"


Sudden deaths of football players make headlines time after time: competitive athletes who are the idols of many people die just when they are on the playing field and in the limelight. Congenital heart defects often cause their death. Sports physicians and FIFA now plan to ascertain data that can help improve preventive examinations in competitive football.
Read more

Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"


Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
Read more

Every minute counts: rescue workers fight against the clock


When the call comes in at the dispatch center, things need to happen fast: rescue workers sprint to the car, race onto the street and make their way to the patient within a few short minutes. No more than thirty minutes later, the patient arrives at the hospital from which he is hopefully soon released again with a clean bill of health. At least that's how it works in theory.
Read more

RESCUER: "Crowds should take an active part in ensuring their own safety during major events"


Thousands of people push through a tight tunnel: 21 people died while several hundred people were injured this way during the Love Parade 2010 disaster in Duisburg, Germany. Today we know that such disasters could be prevented, if communication between event participants and rescue workers would be better.
Read more

Training: "Participants do not have to experience every mistake they make at the simulator with the patient first"


In an emergency, every flick of the wrist has to be correct – the right treatment is time-critical and usually vital. Mistakes can be fatal, so emergency physicians and paramedics need to be seasoned and experienced. But they will not always know certain problems from their daily work. Using patient simulators, they are able to train for rare situations and learn possible solutions.
Read more