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Image: polyol-modified nanoparticles checking out blood vessels surrounding the tumors; Copyright: Yoon Yeo/Purdue University

Cancer identity technology makes it easier to find tumor's "address"

16/11/2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients. One of the big issues with chemotherapy is that most treatment approaches focus on the tumor itself without paying attention to the microenvironment surrounding the tumor.
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Image: Influenza viruses; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ralwel

FluChip-8G tested for rapid characterization of influenza viruses

16/11/2018

Duke and Duke Kunshan University collaborating with InDevR Inc. to test the new influenza subtyping assay for enhanced surveillance.
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Image: Dr. Ravindra Kohle and Augusta OncoTarget; Copyright: Phil Jones / Augusta University

MCG lab designated to help with patient testing for NCI-MATCH trial

02/11/2018

The Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University has been selected as a designated laboratory for the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, or MATCH trial, which is assessing the effectiveness of targeting cancer-causing gene changes rather than cancer type.
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Image: Brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd.

Brain infection or cancer? A new rapid test could hold the answer

02/11/2018

When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord. The differences in diagnosis can mean having mere hours to act. Researchers at Jefferson have developed a test that could rapidly parse out infections of the brain from other diseases.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: Raman microscopy to develop better cancer drugs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Alex011973

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance

30/10/2018

Biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumour cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies.
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Image: Antibody against tumor cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / toeytoey

Novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

29/10/2018

Belgian research groups from the UCLouvain and WELBIO, VIB and Ghent University, and the biotechnology company argenx elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity against tumor cells in cancer patients.
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Image: Farhad Farjood ; Copyright: Utah State University

Researchers develop new devices to test retinal cells

25/10/2018

Researchers at Utah State University have developed new devices to mechanically stress human cells in the lab.
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Image: blood vessels in the shape of a human body; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

3D bioprinting - artificial blood vessels

22/10/2018

University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue.
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Image: Researchers Dong-Wook Kim (left) and Kwon-Sik Park were part of a team that has developed a way to better understand the complexities of cancer's causes; Copyright: Courtesy Park Lab

Big-picture approach to understanding cancer will speed treatments

19/10/2018

A new innovation in cancer research will enable scientists to understand the complex causes of the disease with unprecedented speed and sophistication. This will accelerate the development of new and better treatments, and it will help researchers find ways around roadblocks that now stand in their path.
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Image: One of the largest trials to investigate a predictive blood test to guide cancer treatment; Copyright: panthermedia.net / londondeposit

Cancer blood test trialed to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy

19/10/2018

Cancer patients could be spared unnecessary chemotherapy - and its side effects - by a new blood test that is in clinical trials at more than 40 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand.
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Image: Allergen-specific immunotherapy can provide long-term protection against asthma; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ilona75

Test predicts outcome of hay fever therapies

18/10/2018

Allergen-specific immunotherapy can make everyday life more pleasant for allergy sufferers and provide long-term protection against asthma. It is unclear what exactly happens during this treatment. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy.
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Image: Breast tomosynthesis gives more and improved image information and less overlapping tissue structures, so the chance of detecting tumours increases; Copyright: panthermedia.net/zlikovec

3D mammography detected 34 percent more breast cancers in screening

16/10/2018

After screening 15 000 women over a period of five years, a major clinical study in Sweden has shown that 3D mammography, or breast tomosynthesis, detects over 30% more cancers compared to traditional mammography - with a majority of the detected tumours proving to be invasive cancers. The extensive screening study was conducted by Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden.
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Image: An automated method can searching for, focusing on, imaging, and tracking single molecules within living cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / bobbigmac

Artificial Intelligence Aids Automatic Monitoring of Single Molecules

15/10/2018

Japanese researchers have developed an automated method of tracking single fluorescently labeled molecules in living cells, enabling large numbers of molecules to be analyzed and characterized rapidly and cost-effectively.
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Image: A new research has shown how the kidney responds to the contrast dye, and reveals new ways to protect the kidneys better; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

Making imaging tests safer for people at risk of acute kidney injury

15/10/2018

Every year millions of people undergo medical tests and procedures, such as coronary angiography, which use intravascular contrast dyes. "However, about eight per cent of those people experience the complication of acute kidney injury (AKI)," says Dr. Dan Muruve, MD, a kidney specialist and member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases at the Cumming School of Medicine (CSM).
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Image: Woman in white coat looks at hologram with a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Computational model clarifies immune response during cardiac surgery

12/10/2018

A research team led by Peter Sloot, professor of Complex Adaptive Systems at the UvA, has managed to pinpoint the mechanisms behind the immune response triggered in patients undergoing open heart surgery.
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Image: Lyme on skin; Copyright: panthermedia.net / daksel

New techniques can detect lyme disease earlier than before

11/10/2018

Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.
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Image: Child measuring her height; Copyright: panthermedia.net / choreograph

New DNA tool predicts height - shows promise for illness assessment

10/10/2018

A new DNA tool created by Michigan State University can accurately predict people’s height, and more importantly, could potentially assess their risk for serious illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer.
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Image: Lab-on-a-chip; Copyright: Sanaz Habibi

How to make a lab-on-a-chip clear and biocompatible

08/10/2018

Microfluidic devices can take standard medical lab procedures and condenses each down to a microchip that can balance on top of a water bottle lid. A team from Michigan Technological University, studying chemical engineering, electrical engineering and materials science, streamline the design of microfluidic devices to be see-through to observe their inner workings.
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Image: Graph resulting from analysis of the expression of different genes; Copyright: Nuno Agostinho, iMM

New approach on the use of big data in clinical decision support

05/10/2018

A new computational approach that allows the identification of molecular alterations associated with prognosis and resistance to therapy of different types of cancer was developed by the research grould led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal).
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Image: A new diagnostic tool utilises ultrasound to measure intracranial pressure following accidents; Copyright: panthermedia.net / gyn9037

A diagnostic tool to save lives and prevent brain damage

04/10/2018

A new study confirms the efficacy of a new diagnostic tool that utilises ultrasound to measure intracranial pressure following accidents. The technology will now be provided with artificial intelligence so that ambulance personnel can carry out examinations at accident scenes.
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Image: These are mutant PMD oligodendrocytes rescued with drug-like compound Ro 25-698; Copyright: Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

New method to more efficiently generate brain stem cells

03/10/2018

A scientific team at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports on the discovery and implementation of a new, more efficient method for generating an important brain stem cell in the laboratory. The findings pave the way for greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of neurological disorders of myelin and ultimately, possible new treatment and prevention options.
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Image: Cell Model Passports will enable cancer researchers to select the best model(s) for their research; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Journey to cancer treatment takes off with new passports tool

03/10/2018

Cancer research and the future of precision cancer treatment will be accelerated by a new tool developed by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The novel tool, called Cell Model Passports, acts as a central hub for the rapidly expanding number of cancer models, which are critically needed for cancer research.
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Image: The computer simulation shows how the electromagnetic field is distributed in the silicon layer with hole pattern after excitation with a laser; Copyright: Carlo Barth/HZB

Machine learning helps improving photonic applications

02/10/2018

Nanostructures can increase the sensitivity of optical sensors enormously - provided that the geometry meets certain conditions and matches the wavelength of the incident light. This is because the electromagnetic field of light can be greatly amplified or reduced by the local nanostructure.
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Image: A cryo-EM reconstruction of the microtubule-MAP4-kinesin complex; Copyright: Kobe University

Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules

02/10/2018

Microtubules help to regulate cell structure throughout our bodies. A group of Japanese researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable, and regulates microtubule-based transport within cells. The new insights could help to develop medical treatment for diseases such as dementia and heart failure.
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Image: This is the material sample during testing.; Copyright: Niels Wegner

How to predict life of implants without animal testing

24/09/2018

An international team of researchers consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS and TU Dortmund University has developed a technology to study the behavior of orthopedic implants in laboratory conditions as close as possible to the human body. The technology is notable for its ethics: the research can be carried out in vitro - that is, without involving lab animals.
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Image: Human breast cancer tissue stained by immunofluorescence; Copyright: Jackson Laboratory

New way to target advanced breast cancers

21/09/2018

A cytokine signature found in certain kinds of breast cancer cells can not only serve as a diagnostic tool for HER2-negative cancers but also offer an effective treatment target.
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Image: Cultivation on agar may soon be a thing of the past when testing patients for multi-resistent pathogens; Copyright: University of Cologne

New test procedure for diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens

21/09/2018

A team of researchers at the University of Cologne's Faculty of Medicine and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) has achieved a scientific breakthrough in the accelerated diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens. Using a novel immunochromatographic method, the researchers detected bacteria that are resistant to the antibiotic group carbapenemes.
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Image: Observing never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / AlexLipa

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells’ natural behavior

20/09/2018

A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics.
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Image: A new brain imaging method for a correct diagnostic of Alzheimer`s disease; Copyright: panthermdia.net / londondeposit

New method enables accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

20/09/2018

Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease can be difficult, as several other conditions can cause similar symptoms. Now a new brain imaging method can show the spread of specific tau protein depositions, which are unique to cases with Alzheimer's.
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Image: The microscope image shows mitochondria, the cell's power plants; Copyright: AG Herrmann

Proteins surf to mitochondria – Novel transport pathway discovered

18/09/2018

Prof. Johannes Herrmann, a researcher at the Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, and his team discovered a novel mechanism by which newly synthesized proteins reach their respective target compartment in the cell. Proteins destined to mitochondria, are not directly transported to mitochondria but are directed to the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum.
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Image: Dr. Dao Nguyen looking at Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Copyright: McGill University Health Centre

New means to fight "un-killable" bacteria in healthcare settings

18/09/2018

Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) have identified new means of fighting drug-tolerant bacteria, a growing global threat as menacing as drug-resistant microbes. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to tolerance, a strategy that makes bacteria "indifferent" to antibiotics and almost "un-killable," which results in chronic infections.
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Image: A photomicrograph of a sagittal section of rat cerebellum; Credit: Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR, US San Diego

Nikon Imaging Center opens at UC San Diego

17/09/2018

Center will provide the latest in microscopic tools and technologies, including "super-resolution"
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Image: Bacterial multiplication, which can lead to inflammations; Copyright: panthermedia.net / frenta

New nanoparticles wait to release drugs, target infection

17/09/2018

Current WSU research shows stimuli-responsive nanoparticles can specifically target infections to simultaneously prevent the spread of bacteria and reduce the inflammation it causes. These microscopic particles are loaded with antibiotic and anti-inflammatory agents which are released when the particles encounter infection in the body.
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Image: viral infectivity; Copyright: Lumacyte

New technology transforming vaccine development

13/09/2018

Could we finally have a faster, more objective analytical tool to rapidly measure viral infectivity for vaccine development and production? Scientists and bioengineers at Thermo Fisher Scientific and LumaCyte believe we do. This peer reviewed work is published in the prestigious journal, Vaccine, by Elsevier.
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Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10/09/2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
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Image: New tests for secondary heart attack risk; Copyright: Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute

New blood test to screen for secondary heart attack

07/09/2018

A blood test that quickly and easily detects whether a person is at risk of a secondary heart attack is being developed by scientists at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute.
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Image: Irradiation plan of a head and neck tumor; Copyright: University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

microRNAs Predict Recurrence Risk of Head and Neck Tumors

07/09/2018

A new method predicts the course of HPV-negative head and neck cancer after radiation chemotherapy. According to a recent article in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, five microRNAs (miRNAs) can provide the decisive data.
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Image: University of Houston professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin ; Copyright: University of Houston

Watching an embryo's neural tube close

05/09/2018

Before a woman even realizes she's pregnant, an embryo will have already developed a neural tube, a hollow structure made of cells which will eventually become the brain and spinal cord. Now UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin will tackle the evolutionary anomaly of why the neural tube closes in most embryos but remains open in others, leading to birth defects
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Image: Brain with simlilar changes in overlapping areas of patients with ADHD and emotional instability; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ efks

Changes in the brains with ADHD and emotional instability

05/09/2018

In both ADHD and emotional instability disorders, the brain exhibits similar changes in overlapping areas, meaning that the two types of conditions should be seen as related and attention should be paid to both during diagnosis. This according to researchers at Karolinska Institutet behind a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry.
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Image: Computational analysis for identifying malaria; Copyright: Cominetti O et al, Figure 2/Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)

A computational analysis identifies malaria

04/09/2018

There are more clinical phenotypes of severe malaria than those defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by "la Caixa" Foundation. The results indicate that heart failure can be a pathogenic mechanism of disease, which has implications in the clinical management of these patients.
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Image: Hands in gloves holding the new diagnostic tool; Copyright: Vivian Abagiu/University of Texas at Austin

Simple test detects disease-carrying mosquitoes

04/09/2018

A new diagnostic tool has been developed by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that can easily, quickly and cheaply identify whether a mosquito belongs to the species that carries dangerous diseases such as Zika virus, dengue, chikungunya or yellow fever. It can also determine whether the bug has come into contact with a mosquito-control strategy known as Wolbachia.
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Image: The male fruit fly uses his song to attract the female.; Copyright: Angela O'Sullivan

Flirting flies: More than just winging it

27/08/2018

Studies of the song of the fruit flies reveal new findings of how the neurons in the brain function. These results can be used to uncover new knowledge on how brains in general function which in the longer term may have medical significance.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: biosensor in a petri dish; Copyright: Michael Daniele

Biosensor allows real-time monitoring for organs-on-a-chip

22/08/2018

A new biosensor allows researchers to track oxygen levels in real time in "organ-on-a-chip" systems, making it possible to ensure that such systems more closely mimic the function of real organs. This is essential if organs-on-a-chip hope to achieve their potential in applications such as drug and toxicity testing.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01/02/2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image:

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Graphic of an ebola virus against a blue background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/krishna creations

Who am I? Viruses on Nanosprings

21/12/2016

Within the scope of the VIRUSCAN project that is funded by the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program of the European Union, Dr. Charlotte Uetrecht from Hamburg/Germany investigates individual viruses to be able to later identify them on a nanospring structure. MEDICA.de wanted to know: how does this work?
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: DNA section

Human Genetics: "Physicians should be able to counsel patients on the process"

01/04/2016

Human genetics is the study of the genetic makeup of human beings. DNA, chromosomes, and genes are extensively analyzed by medical specialists. Physicians of Germany need to have a qualification in genetic counseling to successfully advise patients.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Graphic of the operation

Filling bone defects – replacement tissue with its own blood supply

01/02/2016

First grow tissue in the lab, then insert it into patients when they need it and you’re done! Unfortunately, things are not as easy as people hoped at the onset of “tissue engineering”. Although robust tissues for bone defects can be grown in a petri dish, for example, they unfortunately quickly die off again inside the body if there is no corresponding nutrient supply.
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Photo: white jeep

Rapid Tests: valuable helpers for use in the field

04/01/2016

Infectious diseases are widespread in conflict areas. When basic medical care is lacking on location, people cannot be appropriately treated. Laboratory tests are limited in the field. Rapid diagnostic tests make it possible for medical personnel to quickly and accurately test patients for several infectious diseases, for instance for the presence of malaria or HIV infection.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Ebola test

Ebola: detection strips instead of lab tests

04/01/2016

When infectious diseases such as Ebola break out, a rapid diagnosis is important because the early detection of a virus along with the right hygiene measures can prevent its continued spread. However, laboratories and skilled personnel are not available everywhere. Low-cost and portable detection strips can bring relief.
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Wanted: rapid test to prevent deep vein thrombosis

01/07/2015

Deep vein thrombosis is not just a risk factor for frequent flyers but also for wearers of cardiovascular implants and newly operated patients. Blood thinners prevent these dangerous blood clots from forming, but they need to be carefully adjusted and do not work the same way in every patient. A detailed analysis of platelets (thrombocytes) could prevent complications in the future.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Photo: Spinal disc stress simulator

Spinal disc herniation: causal research with the simulator

01/10/2014

Herniated discs can have very different effects: some cause no discomfort and are only discovered by accident; others can cause paralysis or cause patients to be in great pain. For the most part, these problems develop suddenly after an awkward movement – at least that is what patients report.
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Cultured skin makes large-scale transplantations possible

01/07/2014

Large burns require skin grafting. Surgeons remove split-thickness skin grafts and apply them to the injured areas. Now skin that has been made in a laboratory is meant to help in covering burns as well as chronic wounds and thus promote the healing process. Researchers in Zurich have been working on this for more than 13 years.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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