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Image: purple luminescent shapes on black background; Copyright: Jacqueline Morris & Jaehee Lee, University of Pennsylvania

First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria

14/12/2017

DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, found researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Image: The upper panel shows normal lung tumors, and the lower one shows lung tumors after RANK pathway inhibition; Copyright: IMBA

Women and lung cancer – the role of sex hormones

01/12/2017

Researchers at the Austrian Academy of Sciences’ Institute for Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) have identified a remarkable connection between sex hormones and primary lung cancer. A medicine that has already been approved for osteoporosis and bone metastasis could now be used to prevent a particularly aggressive form of adenocarcinoma.
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Image: Fluorescence microscopy images of blood vessels supported by perivascular cells; Copyright: Bern University Hospital/University of Bern

Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer

26/10/2017

A study from Bern University Hospital in collaboration with the University of Bern shows that so-called perivascular-like cells from lung tumors behave abnormally. They not only inadequately support vascular structures, but also may actively modulate the inflammatory and immune response. These findings may represent a novel stromal cancer target.
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Image: new born baby with pacifier on a pillow; Copyright: panthermredia.net/hansenn

How the lungs of premature babies can undergo damage

09/10/2017

Premature babies that need ventilation to support their breathing often suffer from a condition known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have now discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a key role in the development of the disease.
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Image: image of a transparent human upper body with blue lungs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/iLexx

COPD action plan shortens duration of flare-ups and reduces hospital admissions

03/10/2017

The University of Twente carried out the first study worldwide that shows patients with COPD (lung disease caused by smoking) and other illnesses (heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and depression) have better outcomes if they follow a self-management programme with a customised action plan. Anke Lenferink of UT recently obtained a doctoral degree on this subject.
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Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02/10/2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
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Image: X-ray image of a human chest, showing the lungs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Guzel

Respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal conditions, depressive symptoms and diabetes

22/09/2017

Respiratory diseases are major causes of disease burden and mortality. They are also the focus of the latest issue of the Journal of Health Monitoring, which features a Focus article that considers acute respiratory diseases such as influenza as well as chronic lung diseases including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma.
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Image: woman holding a sketch of a human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Molecular Microsystems: Preventing Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

01/08/2017

An increasing percentage of the world population suffers from chronic inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. Acute attacks often lead to a worsening of the disease and considerably reduce the patient’s lung volume. Nine institutes of a research alliance under the Leibniz Institute umbrella are working on technologies designed to predict and thus prevent exacerbations.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: Children playing outside, getting wet in the water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08/03/2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Photo: Stents

Stents: Braiding versus cutting

22/05/2015

Braided stents are nothing new in medicine, but their manufacturing process is still time-consuming. This is why Professor Stefan Jockenhövel from the RWTH Aachen University and his team want to make machine production possible.
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Photo: Silicon model of the lung in a bluely lit water tank

Lungs: "Liquid ventilation is still not sufficiently researched"

09/03/2015

All swimmers know the unpleasant feeling when you breathe in at the wrong time and then have water enter into your windpipe. At best, it immediately triggers the cough reflex, which is intended to keep the water away from the airways and prevent suffocation. However, liquid in the lungs can also save people - especially if it allows them to breathe again.
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