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Image: polyol-modified nanoparticles checking out blood vessels surrounding the tumors; Copyright: Yoon Yeo/Purdue University

Cancer identity technology makes it easier to find tumor's "address"

16/11/2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients. One of the big issues with chemotherapy is that most treatment approaches focus on the tumor itself without paying attention to the microenvironment surrounding the tumor.
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Image: Prostata under microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Martin Kreutz

Prostate cancer radiotherapy can be more precisely targeted

09/11/2018

Current standard imaging techniques for initial staging of prostate cancer often underestimate the extent of disease beyond the prostate. A study featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's November issue demonstrates that prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can pinpoint prostate cancer locations with superior accuracy.
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Image: fluorescent marker in use; Copyright: Colin Watts

New fluorescent marker

05/11/2018

A chemical that highlights tumour cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a trial presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.
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Image: Dr. Ravindra Kohle and Augusta OncoTarget; Copyright: Phil Jones / Augusta University

MCG lab designated to help with patient testing for NCI-MATCH trial

02/11/2018

The Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University has been selected as a designated laboratory for the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, or MATCH trial, which is assessing the effectiveness of targeting cancer-causing gene changes rather than cancer type.
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Image: Brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd.

Brain infection or cancer? A new rapid test could hold the answer

02/11/2018

When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord. The differences in diagnosis can mean having mere hours to act. Researchers at Jefferson have developed a test that could rapidly parse out infections of the brain from other diseases.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Raman microscopy to develop better cancer drugs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Alex011973

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance

30/10/2018

Biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumour cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies.
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Image: Antibody against tumor cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / toeytoey

Novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

29/10/2018

Belgian research groups from the UCLouvain and WELBIO, VIB and Ghent University, and the biotechnology company argenx elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity against tumor cells in cancer patients.
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Image: Researchers Dong-Wook Kim (left) and Kwon-Sik Park were part of a team that has developed a way to better understand the complexities of cancer's causes; Copyright: Courtesy Park Lab

Big-picture approach to understanding cancer will speed treatments

19/10/2018

A new innovation in cancer research will enable scientists to understand the complex causes of the disease with unprecedented speed and sophistication. This will accelerate the development of new and better treatments, and it will help researchers find ways around roadblocks that now stand in their path.
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Image: One of the largest trials to investigate a predictive blood test to guide cancer treatment; Copyright: panthermedia.net / londondeposit

Cancer blood test trialed to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy

19/10/2018

Cancer patients could be spared unnecessary chemotherapy - and its side effects - by a new blood test that is in clinical trials at more than 40 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand.
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Image: A novel method for monitoring the effect of lung cancer therapy may help guide treatment choices: Copyright: panthermedia.net / 18percentgrey

New method uses just a drop of blood to monitor lung cancer treatment

17/10/2018

Researchers from Osaka University find that a novel method for monitoring the effect of lung cancer therapy may help guide treatment choices.
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Image: Breast tomosynthesis gives more and improved image information and less overlapping tissue structures, so the chance of detecting tumours increases; Copyright: panthermedia.net/zlikovec

3D mammography detected 34 percent more breast cancers in screening

16/10/2018

After screening 15 000 women over a period of five years, a major clinical study in Sweden has shown that 3D mammography, or breast tomosynthesis, detects over 30% more cancers compared to traditional mammography - with a majority of the detected tumours proving to be invasive cancers. The extensive screening study was conducted by Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden.
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Image: Man in red; Copyright: Egoi Markaida. UPV/EHU

The significance of water in a promising biomarker against cancer

12/10/2018

The Tn antigen appears in 90% of cancers and is associated with metastasis. That is why "they are very promising biomarkers for identifying cancer cells and have become very attractive targets in therapies to fight cancer", explained Emilio José Cocinero, member of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry and the Biofísika Institute, and one of the lead authors of the work.
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Image: x-ray pelvis; Copyright: Bildagentur PantherMedia  / Harald Richter

Robot could one day fight most common cancer in men

08/10/2018

A robot could become the 'weapon' of choice for detecting and treating the most common cancer in men, improving results and reducing side effects. Scientists and mathematicians in the UK, Netherlands and France are working on a potentially game-changing way of improving the accuracy of both prostate cancer biopsies and of brachytherapy, which is used to treat some prostate cancers.
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Image: Graph resulting from analysis of the expression of different genes; Copyright: Nuno Agostinho, iMM

New approach on the use of big data in clinical decision support

05/10/2018

A new computational approach that allows the identification of molecular alterations associated with prognosis and resistance to therapy of different types of cancer was developed by the research grould led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, Group Leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM; Portugal).
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Image: These are mutant PMD oligodendrocytes rescued with drug-like compound Ro 25-698; Copyright: Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

New method to more efficiently generate brain stem cells

03/10/2018

A scientific team at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine reports on the discovery and implementation of a new, more efficient method for generating an important brain stem cell in the laboratory. The findings pave the way for greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of neurological disorders of myelin and ultimately, possible new treatment and prevention options.
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Image: Cell Model Passports will enable cancer researchers to select the best model(s) for their research; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Journey to cancer treatment takes off with new passports tool

03/10/2018

Cancer research and the future of precision cancer treatment will be accelerated by a new tool developed by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The novel tool, called Cell Model Passports, acts as a central hub for the rapidly expanding number of cancer models, which are critically needed for cancer research.
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Image: The prognostic system for myelodysplastic syndrome tool provides a more contemporary prognostic system that integrates genetic and clinical information; Copyright: panthermedia.net / snowing

New genetics-based prognostic tool for myelodysplastic syndrome

01/10/2018

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed a new genetics-based prognostic tool for myelodysplastic syndrome. Their findings are published in the October print issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
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Image: A very promising vaccine for HER2-overexpressing cancers; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Esbenklinker

New cancer vaccine for patients with HER2-positive cancers

01/10/2018

Treatment with a HER2-targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine provided clinical benefit to several patients with metastatic HER2-positive cancers who had not previously been treated with a HER2-targeted therapeutic, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01/10/2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: breast cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net/otnaydur

Barriers to breast cancer screening?

28/09/2018

Black women are more likely to be diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer partly due to barriers to timely screening mammography.
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Image: Human breast cancer tissue stained by immunofluorescence; Copyright: Jackson Laboratory

New way to target advanced breast cancers

21/09/2018

A cytokine signature found in certain kinds of breast cancer cells can not only serve as a diagnostic tool for HER2-negative cancers but also offer an effective treatment target.
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Image: Observing never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / AlexLipa

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells’ natural behavior

20/09/2018

A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics.
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Image: An AI tool can analyse images of patients' lung tumors; Copyright: NYU School of Medicine

Artificial intelligence can determine lung cancer type

19/09/2018

Led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine and published online in Nature Medicine, the study found that a type of artificial intelligence (AI), or "machine learning" program, could distinguish with 97 percent accuracy between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma-two lung cancer types that experienced pathologists at times struggle to parse without confirmatory tests.
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Image: Irradiation plan of a head and neck tumor; Copyright: University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

microRNAs Predict Recurrence Risk of Head and Neck Tumors

07/09/2018

A new method predicts the course of HPV-negative head and neck cancer after radiation chemotherapy. According to a recent article in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, five microRNAs (miRNAs) can provide the decisive data.
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Image: Hong Chen, assistant professor of biomedical engineering; Copyright: Washington University in St. Louis

Focused delivery for brain cancers

06/09/2018

A person's brainstem controls some of the body's most important functions, including heart beat, respiration, blood pressure and swallowing. Tumor growth in this part of the brain is therefore twice as devastating. Not only can such a growth disrupt vital functions, but operating in this area is so risky, many medical professionals refuse to consider it as an option.
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Image: two men next to the computer with the software on the screen; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Researchers use AI to treat cancer

03/09/2018

A translational research team led by the National University of Singapore (NUS) has harnessed CURATE.AI, a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) platform, to successfully treat a patient with advanced cancer, completely halting disease progression. This new development represents a big step forward in personalised medicine.
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Image: man shows an image of the lungs on a big screen; Copyright: University of Central Florida, Karen Norum

A.I. System to detect often-missed cancer tumors

24/08/2018

Doctors may soon have help in the fight against cancer thanks to the University of Central Florida's Computer Vision Research Center. Engineers at the center have taught a computer how to detect tiny specks of lung cancer in CT scans, which radiologists often have a difficult time identifying.
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Image: biosensor in a petri dish; Copyright: Michael Daniele

Biosensor allows real-time monitoring for organs-on-a-chip

22/08/2018

A new biosensor allows researchers to track oxygen levels in real time in "organ-on-a-chip" systems, making it possible to ensure that such systems more closely mimic the function of real organs. This is essential if organs-on-a-chip hope to achieve their potential in applications such as drug and toxicity testing.
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Image: woman in her office; Copyright: Simon Simard

A GPS for inside your body

21/08/2018

Medical processes like imaging often require cutting someone open or making them swallow huge tubes with cameras on them. But what if could get the same results with methods that are less expensive, invasive and time-consuming?
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09/04/2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03/04/2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01/09/2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10/07/2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03/07/2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: A flat device with a touch screen; Copyright: biolitec AG

Surgical lasers: the quest to be compact, mobile, and user-friendly

03/07/2017

Not all lasers are the same – especially in the surgical field, it all depends on what’s inside: the different operational wavelengths of laser light also affect human tissue in different ways. This is why a single laser for a variety of applications drastically simplifies the job of physicians.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential

03/08/2015

Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Cancer prevention: Beneficial and ultimately personal

04/05/2015

There are many decisions to be made in an adult life; among them are cancer prevention screenings. They are voluntary and many people deliberate whether they should go or not and if they would actually want to know the results. Science, politics and health care professionals also ponder with each new preventive service whether it is beneficial and who should end up paying for it.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Surgery: "Our camera detects the tiniest remainder of a tumor"

03/02/2014

Differentiating tumor tissue from healthy tissue isn’t always easy for surgeons. Scattered cancer cells and early cancer are often hard to detect with the naked eye. A special camera now makes even the tiniest remainder of a tumor visible during surgery.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Photo: Removal of a colon polyp with a snare

Endoscopy: "A small section of the colonic wall is completely removed"

05/01/2014

Eventually, all adults need to see a physician for colon cancer prevention. While the exam goes by quickly thanks to sedation, it sometimes leads to a follow-up procedure if a growth in the colon could not be removed with the endoscope and requires open surgery.
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