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Image: chemical structure of furanosteroids-Structures of wortmannin and viridin; Copyright: The University of Tokyo

Identification of biosynthetic pathway for the steroids with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition activity

25/05/2018

A group of researchers from Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences at The University of Tokyo and Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products at Jinan University, identified the biosynthetic gene cluster for the furanosteroid demethoxyviridin, and deciphered its biosynthetic pathway.
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Image: semaphorin 6D reverse signaling controls lipid metabolism and anti-inflammatory polarization; Copyright: Osaka University

Neuron guidance factor found to play a key role in immune cell function

25/05/2018

Macrophages are white blood cells involved in a variety of biological functions, from destroying infectious pathogens to repairing damaged tissue. To carry out their different roles, macrophages must first be activated and transformed into different subtypes. However, the mechanisms that lead to macrophage activation are not fully understood.
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Image: illustration of DNA strings; Copyright: pixabay.com

The dark side of our genes – healthy ageing in modern times

24/05/2018

The transition to modernity – largely driven by the Industrial Revolution – provided us with easier access to food and clean water, with antibiotics, vaccines, and modern medicine. Yet modernity did not just bring fewer infectious diseases and longer life: it also created an environment radically different from the one we evolved in.
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Image: network of protein fibrills; Copyright: Claessens

Parkinson-related protein is 'tunable'

24/05/2018

Fibrils of the protein alpha-synuclein, that plays a role in Parkinson's disease, form a stiffer and stronger network in water, when temperature is increased. Researchers of the University of Twente show that this has to do with the water-repellent part of the fibres coming to the surface and interacting.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: Image from a confocal microscope showing so-called pin-wheel structure of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Everything flows: cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell division

22/05/2018

Stem cells in the brain can divide and mature into neurons participating in various brain functions, including memory. In a paper published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München have shown how this works. They found that ion channels play a key role in mediating force signals to the neural stem cells to activate them.
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Image: pair of legs during walking; Copyright: IStock

You walk talks

22/05/2018

The way you walk can reveal current and future health problems. New research from Halmstad University suggests the use of wearable sensors for analysing your movement. This can potentially result in early detection of for example Parkinson's disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis and other neuro-physiological disorders.
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Image: Illustration of lung structure from CT scan data; Copyright: University of Southampton

How the power of mathematics can help assess lung function

21/05/2018

Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analysing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other lung diseases.
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Image: A simple protocol developed for insulin preparation; Copyright: Michio Iwaoka

High efficiency synthesis of insulin by self-assembly based organic chemistry

21/05/2018

Researchers at Tokai, Osaka, Tohoku and Fukuoka Universities report in the journal Communications Chemistry on the synthesis of insulin based on the self-assembly of polypeptide chains at about 40% efficiency.
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Image: PET scan showing clumping proteins in rat hearts (top). The enlarged heart (right) is one with heart failure. Other PET scans showing blood flow; Copyright: Circulation Research, May 11, 2018

Heart failure: The Alzheimer's disease of the heart?

18/05/2018

Protein clumping may contribute to heart failure development and could be used as a diagnostic tool for testing therapies or disease progression.
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Image: Clusters of MAIT cells in human blood and colon biopsies; Copyright: Department of Biomedicine, Tobias Rutishauser; Copyright: University of Basel

Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteria

18/05/2018

A little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest, as researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the journal Mucosal Immunology.
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Image: smiling young woman - Laura Volpicelli-Daley; Copyright: UAB

Untangling brain neuron dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

17/05/2018

A neuron model of Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementias shows defects that could suggest treatments to halt or reverse cognitive impairments before the neurons die.
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Image: wooden spoon with fish oil pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sommaill

Symptoms of osteoarthritis lessened with simple changes to the diet

17/05/2018

One gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study in Rheumatology reports.
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Image: blood vessel with red and white blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

New insights into blood vessel growth

16/05/2018

Scientists at the Goethe University have discovered that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
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Image: woman who has fallen asleep in front of a computer during her night shift; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sakkmesterke

The effect of night shifts: gene expression fails to adapt to new sleep patterns

16/05/2018

Have you ever considered that working night shifts may, in the long run, have an impact on your health? A team of researchers from the McGill University affiliated Douglas Mental Health University Institute (DMHUI) has discovered that genes regulating important biological processes are incapable of adapting to new sleeping and eating patterns.
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Image: smiling young woman - Megha Padi, Ph.D., director of the UA Cancer Center Bioinformatics Shared Resource; Copyright: University of Arizona Health Sciences/BioCommunications

Unlocking cancer's secrets using the 'social networks' of cells

14/05/2018

Megha Padi, Ph.D., of the UA Cancer Center has developed a method for probing the genetic underpinnings of cancer and other diseases, which could lead to better treatments.
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Image: scientist holding up a test tube containing a pink liquid; Copyright: Medical University of Vienna

Combating cancer and infectious diseases with natural milk protein

14/05/2018

Researchers from the Institute for Hygiene and Applied Immunology of the Center for Pathophysiology, Infectology and Immunology at MedUni Vienna, led by Hannes Stockinger, have discovered a hitherto unknown function of the protein lactoferrin, which is primarily found in breast milk.
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Image: Tahir Hussain in the laboratory; Copyright: Kris Kehe/UH College of Pharmacy

Protecting kidneys from obesity

11/05/2018

UH professor of pharmacology Tahir Hussain has received $1.6M from the National Institutes of Health to examine a kidney cell that could prevent damage from inflammation caused by obesity. The targeted cells express a protein called the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R), which recently has been indicated to have anti-inflammatory and reno protective actions.
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Image: information on prescribing patterns within peer distribution; Copyright: Kirsty Challen, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, UK

Providing clinicians feedback on their opioid prescribing data alters future prescribing

11/05/2018

Asking emergency department (ED) providers to self-identify their opioid prescribing practices and then providing them with timely, clinically relevant, individualized, and actionable feedback on their actual opioid prescribing data, significantly decreases future opioid prescribing among providers who underestimate their baseline prescribing.
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Image: chemical structure in shape of an octopus; Copyright: Georgia Tech / Wu / Xiao & NYPL Digital Commons / Brumfield

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteins

10/05/2018

Cancer drops sparse chemical hints of its presence early on, but unfortunately, many of them are in a class of biochemicals that could not be detected thoroughly, until now. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have engineered a chemical trap that exhaustively catches what are called glycoproteins, including minuscule traces that have previously escaped detection.
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Image: Khodayar Rais-Bahrami with a text about the press release; Copyright: Children's National Health System

COstatus monitor provides direct measure of neonates' cardiac output

10/05/2018

Clinicians caring for vulnerable babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to closely monitor their vital signs, but precisely gauging the function of their tiny hearts has remained elusive.
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Image: two walnuts, one of it half open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dionisvera

Walnuts impact gut microbiome and improve health

09/05/2018

Diets rich in nuts, such as walnuts, have been shown to play a role in heart health and in reducing colorectal cancer. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the way walnuts impact the gut microbiome – the collection of trillions of microbes or bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract – may be behind some of those health benefits.
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Image: Karen Fratantoni with a text about the press release; Copyright: Children's National Health System

Depression among parents of newborns can persist after NICU discharge

09/05/2018

Young parents who have less education and care for more than one child are more likely to have persistent symptoms of depression that linger six months after their newborn is discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a Children's National Health System research presentation during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2018 annual meeting.
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Image: binding of nNOS to the protein NOS1AP; Copyright: University of Turku

New approach for treating neuropathic pain

08/05/2018

Neuropathic pain is the chronic, pathological pain that continues even when the cause of pain is removed. Causes include damage to nerve cells and medicines used to treat cancer. A collaboration between research groups from USA and Finland has discovered a novel therapeutic that appears to interrupt the signaling cascades in the body required for multiple forms of neuropathic pain.
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Image: Drs. Babak Baban (from left), Jack Yu and Jatinder Bhatia in the Children's Hospital of Georgia's NICU; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milk

08/05/2018

Immune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say. They say the presence of this SWAT team of immune cells called innate lymphoid cells, or ILCs, in human breast milk is more evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08/05/2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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Image: map of the US showing varying rates of identification, including underrepresentation, of autism for minority groups in 2014; Copyright: Jason Travers, Exceptional Children

Study shows minorities widely underrepresented in autism diagnoses

07/05/2018

In education circles, it is widely accepted that minorities are overrepresented in special education. New research from the University of Kansas has found, in terms of autism, minorities are widely underrepresented in special education.
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Image: chemical diagram representing the new compound JVW-1034; Copyright: James Sahn/University of Texas at Austin

Anti-alcoholism drug shows promise

07/05/2018

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have successfully tested in animals a drug that, they say, may one day help block the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that incessantly coax people with alcoholism to drink. If eventually brought to market, it could help the more than 15 million Americans, and many more around the world who suffer from alcoholism stay sober.
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Image: young woman holding her head, with a sad expression on her face and black lines emerging from her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIphotography

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCD

04/05/2018

Advances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study by the University of Waterloo.
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Image: smiling man in an office - Subhrangsu Mandal, UTA associate professor of chemistry; Copyright: UTA

UTA researchers investigate link between ovarian hormones and blood cholesterol levels

04/05/2018

Results may open new avenues for treating cardiovascular disease.
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Image: Three-dimensional structures of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; Copyright: Hibbs Lab, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addiction

03/05/2018

UT Southwestern researchers today published in Nature atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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Image: vessels of the retina; Copyright: Michael Chiang/OHSU

AI better than most human experts at detecting cause of preemie blindness

03/05/2018

New algorithm could help overcome shortage of physicians trained in disease diagnosis.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Image: Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from the stem cells of patients with hemophilia B show very low levels of clotting factor IX, or FIX, shown in white; Copyright: Salk Institute

Single injection treats hemophilia B for life, in proof-of-concept study

02/05/2018

For most people with hemophilia B, whose bodies can't properly form blood clots, constant injections to replenish their clotting factors are a way of life.
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Image: human eye, focus on the retina; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hquality

Strategy prevents blindness in mice with retinal degeneration

02/05/2018

More than 2 million people worldwide live with inherited and untreatable retinal conditions, including retinitis pigmentosa, which slowly erodes vision.
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Image: ocean view; Copyright: Sarah Bird/Michigan Tech

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular health

27/04/2018

It sounds like a late-night commercial: In just one hour you can reduce your anxiety levels and some heart health risk factors. But a recent study with 14 participants shows preliminary data that even a single session of meditation can have cardiovascular and psychological benefits for adults with mild to moderate anxiety.
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Image: image of a retina; Copyright: Centre for Vision Research, the Westmead Institute for Medical Research

Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease

27/04/2018

New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk.
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Image: woman with scarf around her head and a girl sitting smiling on a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Novel discoveries on aggressive NK-cell leukemia

26/04/2018

International research consortium led by researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, discovered new information related to a rare form of leukemia called aggressive NK-cell leukemia. Potential new treatment options were found which are highly warranted as currently this disease usually leads to rapid death of patients. The study was published in Nature Communications.
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Image: Florescent cells in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex brain regions, with inset; Copyright: Andrew Moberly, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Fight, flight, or freeze

26/04/2018

"Take a deep breath" is the mantra of every anxiety-reducing advice list ever written. And for good reason. There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion.
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Image: illustration of equal and unequal crossovers during meiosis; Copyright: University of Rochester illustration / Michael Osadciw

Gene controlling genetic recombination rates

25/04/2018

Genetics is a crapshoot. During sexual reproduction, genes from both the mother and the father mix and mingle to produce a genetic combination unique to each offspring. In most cases, the chromosomes line up properly and crossover. In some unlucky cases, "selfish DNA" enters the mix, causing abnormal crossovers with deletions or insertions in chromosomes, which can manifest as birth defects.
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Image: fish counter; Copyright: Chalmers University of Technology

Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's disease

25/04/2018

A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health. Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease.
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Image: woman who cleans her nose among flowers; Copyright: Fotolia

Our genes dictate who develops an allergy

24/04/2018

Whether or not you develop an allergy is largely dependent upon genetic factors. This is the main finding of a study recently published in EBioMedicine, just in time for World Allergy Week (22-28. April 2018). The study was supervision of Winfried F. Pickl from MedUni Vienna's Institute of Immunology.
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Image: bright colours that flow into each other: illustration of EMT; Copyright: Université libre de Bruxelles

Cancer: Tumor transition states

24/04/2018

Tumor heterogeneity describes the differences between different cells within a given tumor. These differences have major implications for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of cancer patients. Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for tumor heterogeneity such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT).
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: toddler who gets vaccined in the arms of a nurse; Copyright: panthermedia.net/evgenyataman

European Immunization Week 2018 – the right to be protected or the duty to protect?

23/04/2018

The European Immunization Week's general slogan "Prevent. Protect. Immunize" is more relevant than ever in times of globalization and migration. It is a political and structural challenge to give as many people as possible access to vaccination. But even the best care is of no use if the individual does not recognize his or her duty to society.
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Image: two men in the laboratory, one sitting at a microscope or similar, another standing behind him; Copyright: RUB, Kramer

Cancer drug observed at work

23/04/2018

Using a Raman microscope, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have studied at which targets the cancer drug Neratinib binds in cells and how its chemical structure changes. Compared with other techniques, this method offers a considerable advantage, as it is not necessary to apply a label to the drug that would indicate its distribution indirectly; rather, the drug itself can be monitored.
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Image: Mouse cells with (left) or without (right) DOR protein in green and blue ob black ground; Copyright: M. Romero, IRB Barcelona

DOR protein deficiency favours the development of obesity

23/04/2018

Obesity is a world health problem since excessive accumulation of fat tissue (or adipose tissue) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and some types of cancer. However, some obese individuals are less susceptible to these conditions.
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Image: Abnormally activated astrocytes were accumulated in the lesion of ALS mouse without TRIF signaling; Copyright: Koji Yamanaka

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALS mice by eliminating abnormal glial cells

20/04/2018

Researchers led by Nagoya University revealed that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TRIF significantly shortened survival time of ALS mice.
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Image: photo of photosensitizer conjugate; Copyright: Lobachevsky University

New highly selective antitumor photodynamic therapy agents synthesized

20/04/2018

This project is a result of collaboration of the Organic Chemistry Department and the Biophysics Department at the Lobachevsky University with the Research Institute of Macroheterocyclic Compounds.
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Image: scientist in the laboratory - Dr. Ryan A. Davis; Copyright: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University

Antioxidant therapy may reduce cardiovascular risk of young women with type 1 diabetes

19/04/2018

The high estrogen levels that typically afford younger women protection from cardiovascular disease appear to instead multiply their risk if they have type 1 diabetes, researchers say.
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Image: Development of cartilage tissue from mesenchymal stem cells after eight weeks in vivo: Stable cartilage tissue, indicated by red staining (left) ; Copyright: University of Basel

Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

18/04/2018

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.
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Image: smiling woman - Patricia East; Copyright: UC San Diego Health

Mother's depression might do the same to her child's IQ

18/04/2018

Study finds maternal depression negatively impacts a child's cognitive development, infancy through age 16.
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Image: portrait of Jed Meltzer; Copyright:  Baycrest Health Sciences

The brain combats dementia by shifting resources

13/04/2018

The brain continues to put up a fight even as neurodegenerative diseases like dementia damage certain areas and functions. In fact, recent findings in a Baycrest-University of Arizona study suggest that one method the brain uses to counter these diseases is the reassigning of tasks to different regions.
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Image: illustration of the method to induce pancreatic cancer into with inscriptions; Copyright: Dr. Bruno Doiron/UT Health San Antonio

Injecting gene cocktail into mouse pancreas leads to humanlike tumors

13/04/2018

Novel technology developed at UT Health San Antonio gives rise to mouse pancreatic tumors that have the same traits as human pancreatic cancer. A U.S. patent is pending on the invention.
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Image: Microscope image of antibodies and viruses in blue, green, grey and yellow on a black background; Copyright: TSRI/UZH

Attacking flu viruses from two sides

12/04/2018

UZH researchers have discovered a new way in which certain antibodies interact with the flu virus. This previously unknown form of interaction opens up new possibilities for developing better vaccines and more efficient medication to combat the flu.
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Image: colorful 3D globe in comic style with signs for location; Copyright: Shimpei Ishiyama

How to reprogram memory cells in the brain

12/04/2018

Long-term memory of specific places is stored in the brain in so-called place cells. A team of neuroscientists headed by Dr Andrea Burgalossi of the University of Tübingen's Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience (CIN) have now 'reprogrammed' such place cells in free-roaming mice, by sending electrical impulses directly to individual neurons.
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Image: Portrait of Asian man with lab coat in a laboratory; Copyright: CWRU School of Medicine

Attention deficit disorders stem from impaired brain coordination?

11/04/2018

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and colleagues have discovered how two brain regions work together to maintain attention, and how discordance between the regions could lead to attention deficit disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.
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Image: woman with a scarf around her head, embraced from behind by a girl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Efficient genetic modification of immune cells

11/04/2018

A new method enables genes in living T-cells in mice to be modified quickly and efficiently. It makes use of plasmids, a tried-and-tested method of genetic engineering. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in the Journal of Immunology.
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Image: little boy with soap bubbles; Copyright: Children's National Health System

X-linked genes explain why boys face higher respiratory risk

10/04/2018

Human airways already demonstrate gender-based differences in DNA methylation signatures at birth, providing an early hint of which infants may be predisposed to develop respiratory disorders like asthma later in life, a research team reports in a paper published online April 3, 2018, in Scientific Reports.
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Image: portrait of Dr. Stefan Haufe; Copyright: Charité/Peitz

TrueBrainConnect: predicting brain disorders

10/04/2018

Hosted by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the TrueBrainConnect project aims to systematically study connections between different areas of the brain, and hopes to draw conclusions regarding potential disease patterns.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09/04/2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: two men posing in front of the camera; Copyright: Sarah Pack, Medical University of South Carolina

New immunotherapy for lung cancer shows promise of success

09/04/2018

In a groundbreaking development, results from a recent clinical trial to treat lung cancer show that a novel immunotherapy combination is surprisingly effective at controlling the disease's progression. The study, published April 4 in the journal The Lancet Oncology, focused on non-small cell lung cancer, which is the most common form of lung cancer.
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Image: four microscope images in comparison; Copyright: Parekh/MPIP

Stressing out about granule proteins

09/04/2018

MPI-P group leader Sapun Parekh and Brown University Professor Nick Fawzi have received $750,000 from the Human Frontier in Science Program (HFSP) over the next 3 years to study the "Structure and biophysics of disordered domains mediating RNP granules: from atoms to cells".
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Image: smiling woman; Copyright: Kofi Boahene

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous ones

04/04/2018

By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy -- wide and even smiles - to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due to birth defects, stroke, tumors or Bell's palsy.
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Image: a Ixodes scapularis tick; Copyright: Dr. Utpal Pal, University of Maryland

UMD researcher uncovers protein used to outsmart the human immune system

03/04/2018

Findings have major implications for tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease.
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Image: red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets; Copyright: National Cancer Institute

Haemophiliacs and their treatment – danger signals involved in immune response against factor-VIII

03/04/2018

In patients with haemophilia A, the missing blood coagulation factor VIII is administered, and thus replaced, intravenously. A part of the patients, however, develops antibodies (inhibitors) against factor VIII, which, in the worst case scenario, can cause uncontrolled bleeding.
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Image: african female doctor sits in a provisional office at a plastic table with documents and laptop; Copyright: University of Zurich

North and south cooperation to combat tuberculosis

29/03/2018

Tuberculosis can be cured and could be eradicated. For this to happen, however, patients have to receive the right treatment. Researchers at the Makerere University and the University of Zurich were able to demonstrate that the levels of medication used are often too low. As a result, patients remained contagious with the dangerous disease for longer than necessary.
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Image: cancer cells; Copyright: University of Basel, Biozentrum/Swiss Nanoscience Institute

Researchers discover new anti-cancer protein

29/03/2018

An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Prof. Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in Nature that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.
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Image: hand holding a blood sample; Copyright: Fotolia

Alzheimer's disease: patients exhibit changes in certain blood lipids that are typical of premature ageing

28/03/2018

The neurodegenerative condition known as Alzheimer's disease is the commonest cause of dementia. A research group led by molecular biologists Fabian Dorninger and Johannes Berger at MedUni Vienna's Centre for Brain Research investigated changes in certain lipids (choline phospholipids) in the plasma of elderly people who were healthy and those suffering from Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: woman doing sports in nature, looking at her watch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Leung Cho Pan

Stopping exercise can increase symptoms of depression

28/03/2018

Stopping exercise can result in increased depressive symptoms, according to new mental health research from the University of Adelaide.
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Image: portrait of Per-Arne Svensson; Copyright: Malin Arnesson

Obesity surgery prevents severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure

27/03/2018

Patients that underwent weight-loss surgery ran a significantly lower risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, when compared to conventionally treated patients, according to a study published in International Journal of Obesity.
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Image: Doctor measures a man's big belly; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pejo

Biochemists of TU Darmstadt develop substances fighting obesity

27/03/2018

A team led by biochemistry professor Felix Hausch of the TU Darmstadt is working on substances that are to help fighting three widespread diseases: depression, chronic pain and obesity.
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Image: sitting woman with a scarf around her head, behind her stands a woman who puts her hand on her shoulder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ArturVerkhovetskiy

Pushing screening of ovarian and endometrial cancers one step further

26/03/2018

A team from the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal has joined forces with researchers at Johns Hopkins to bring screening and early detection of ovarian and uterine cancers one step closer to clinical implementation. Researchers developed a test that provides a safe and minimally invasive method for earlier diagnosis of ovarian and endometrial cancers.
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Image: Tau proteins accumulated in the brain of a patient with PSP-like symptoms; Copyright: Yabe I. et al., Scientific Reports

The bassoon causing new brain disorder

26/03/2018

Mutations have been found in the bassoon (BSN) gene, which is involved with the central nervous system, in patients with symptoms similar to, but different from, a rare brain disorder called progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).
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Image: smiling middle-aged woman in front of the ocean; Copyright: panthermedia.net/michaeljung

Clear link between fitness in middle age and risk of dementia

23/03/2018

Women who have a high cardiovascular fitness in middle age have a risk of developing dementia when older that is almost 90 percent lower than among women in average physical condition, according to a study published in the journal "Neurology".
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Image: team of researchers; Copyright: Saint Louis University

Scientists discover new causes of cellular decline in prematurely aging kids

22/03/2018

Rare disease also sheds light on normal cell aging, SLU researcher says.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22/03/2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: human hand next to a 3D graphic of a human brain surrounded by neuronal patterns; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

New method manages and stores data from millions of nerve cells - in real time

21/03/2018

Recent developments in neuroscience set high requirements for sophisticated data management, not least when implantable Brain Machine Interfaces are used to establish electronic communication between the brain's nerve cells and computers.
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Image: doctor in front of a computer screen, holding a test tube; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tonodiaz

Epigenetic analysis: Giving the right name to a tumor

21/03/2018

Scientists from the "Hopp Children's Cancer Center" at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ) and the Neuropathology Department at Heidelberg University Hospital have substantially enhanced the classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS).
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Image: female researcher holding a petri dish with cultured germs; Copyright: Goethe University Frankfurt

Research project on dangerous hospital germ extended

20/03/2018

German Research Foundation extends project aimed at combating multi-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains.
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Image: team of researchers in front of a computer; Copyright: Pauline Zulueta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Mapping a genetic risk

20/03/2018

UCalgary researchers discover an important clue to help predict disease.
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Image: team of female researchers in front of a computer; Copyright: WSU

WSU researchers see gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people

19/03/2018

Washington State University researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep deprived.
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Image: leafy green vegetables in a bowl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Elenathewise

Putting a fork in cognitive decline

19/03/2018

While cognitive abilities naturally decline with age, eating one serving of leafy green vegetables a day may aid in preserving memory and thinking skills as a person grows older, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The study results were published in the December 20, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Image: illustration of breaking DNA; Copyright: Université de Genève/Halazonetis

Why premature cell division promotes cancers

16/03/2018

The accumulation of mutations in the human genome is at the origin of cancers, as well as the development of resistance to treatments. The Cyclin E and Myc genes are active in the control of cell division. When they are mutated, for example in response to a carcinogen, these genes induce cells to start replicating their DNA prematurely during the cell cycle.
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Image: Optical readouts of HL-1 cardiomyocytes in response to chemical uncoupling by CCCP in blue and yellow; Copyright: Irene Georgakoudi, Tufts University

Researchers develop optical tools to detect metabolic changes linked to disease

16/03/2018

Metabolic changes in cells can occur at the earliest stages of disease. In most cases, knowledge of those signals is limited, since we usually detect disease only after it has done significant damage.
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Image: Cells with Huntington's disease under the microscope; Copyright: Juan Sbodio

Signaling pathway involving the Golgi apparatus identified in cells with Huntington's disease

15/03/2018

Working with cells grown in the lab, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a biochemical pathway that allows a structure within cells, called the Golgi apparatus, to combat stress caused by free radicals and oxidants. The research team showed that this pathway can be activated by a drug called monensin, which is commonly used as an antibiotic in animal feed.
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Image: illustration of red blood corpuscles; Copyright: University of Basel, Department of Biomedicine

Inherited mutation leads to overproduction of EPO

15/03/2018

A newly-discovered hereditary mutation is responsible for an increased production of erythropoietin (EPO) in the blood. This mutation causes a messenger RNA (mRNA) that is not normally involved in the formation of proteins to be reprogrammed so that it produces EPO, thus abnormally increasing the number of red blood cells.
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Image: elderly man who sits on the edge of the bed and holds his chest painfully; Copyright: panthermedia.net/belchonock

New insights into why patients have a higher risk of heart attack in the morning

14/03/2018

Cardiovascular disease patients have lower levels of an important family of protective molecules in their blood in the morning, which could be increasing their risk of blood clots and heart attacks at those times, according to early research led by Queen Mary University of London.
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Image: different colours running into each other: image of brown fat tissue; Copyright: Reber/TUM

Brown adipose tissue made transparent

14/03/2018

Brown adipose tissue has played a key role in prevention research since its presence was first documented in adults. However, there was no non-invasive method of measuring its heat generation. A team at the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München has now succeeded in making the activity of brown adipose tissue visible without injecting substances.
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Image: laboratory work; Copyright: IRD/PHPT

Hepatitis B: a new strategy for eliminating mother-to-child transmission

13/03/2018

A clinical study coordinated by the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development and Chiang Mai University with their Thai, American, and French partners, strengthens the case for a new strategy to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the hepatitis B virus.
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Image: Close-up of a hand on the wheel of a wheelchair; Copyright: panthermedia.net/apid

Canadian researchers open a new front in the fight against MS

13/03/2018

A discovery led by scientists at the University of Alberta and McGill University is providing hope of a new therapeutic target in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, which could one day be used to prevent the symptoms and progression of the disease.
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Image: two asian women; Copyright: Cindy Brauer

TSRI scientists zero in on treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

12/03/2018

About 1 in 2,500 people have a degenerative nerve disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The disease is typically diagnosed in children, who can lose their ability to walk and use their hands for fine motor skills. There is no cure – yet.
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Image: Lactobacillus reuteri in a biolfilm; Copyright: Quadram Institute

New pH-sensing mechanism points to how beneficial gut bacteria optimise host colonisation and biofilm formation

12/03/2018

Scientists on the Norwich Research Park have discovered a key mechanism by which gut bacteria colonise and adhere to their specific hosts. The finding may lead to new, improved probiotics with optimised abilities to colonise our gut and battle infections by forming strong associations with the host as biofilms.
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Image: young woman scratching her arm; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tharakorn

A new tactic for eczema?

09/03/2018

Scientists identify a natural brake on the allergic attack.
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Image: couple holding hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/macniak

Strong relationships in midlife may offset health risks for victims of childhood abuse

09/03/2018

Victims are not necessarily on a path towards poor health in adulthood.
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Image: a plastic model of a heart and a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Shidlovski

Signals of the heart: TU Darmstadt works on algorithms to detect atrial fibrillation

08/03/2018

There are currently an estimated 1.8 million people in Germany who have atrial fibrillation but do not know it. Now a Dutch company has developed an app with which a smartphone can be used to detect this dangerous cardiac arrhythmia. Scientists at the TU Darmstadt are helping to ensure the recorded data is interpreted correctly and efficiently.
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Image: a man standing in front of a check list showing the most common factors for diabetes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vaeenma

Prediabetes patients at heightened risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney diseases

08/03/2018

Researchers at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found that high proportions of patients with prediabetes are at substantial risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Their findings are published in "The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology".
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: Ribosome; Copyright: DLafontaine ULB

Daffodils to fight against cancer

07/03/2018

A research describes the anti-cancer effects of a natural alkaloid extracted from Daffodils. Led by Denis Lafontaine, affiliated with the Faculty of Sciences at the ULB, the researchers have discovered that this compound triggers the activation of an anti-tumoral surveillance pathway.
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Image: blood-patrolling monocytes (red) adhering to inflamed endothelium (green) in the inner curvature of the aortic arch of a mouse with incipient atherosclerosis; Copyright: CNIC

Blocking a protein could improve the effectiveness of intravascular cellular 'policing'

07/03/2018

The study shows that blockade of the protease MT4-MMP increases the activity of blood-patrolling monocytes in the circulation.
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Image: elderly man whose eye is examined via microscope; Copyright: Ola Nilsson

Nerve damage in type 2 diabetes can be detected in the eye

06/03/2018

By examining the cornea of ​​the eye with a special microscope it may be possible within ten minutes to diagnose if a person with type 2 diabetes has nerve damage. This according to a study among diabetics in Skellefteå, north Sweden.
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Image: pencil sketch of a human head with brain which is erased by an eraser; Copyright: panthermedia.net/andreus

Brain ageing may begin earlier than expected

06/03/2018

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and ageing related diseases.
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Image: Rebecca Hochstein collecting samples in a hot spring in Yellowstone; Copyright: Derek Loudermilk

MSU researchers reveal findings about virus that lives in Yellowstone hot springs

05/03/2018

For seven years as a graduate student at Montana State University, Rebecca Hochstein hiked into the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.
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Image: a pink female gender symbol next to a blue male gender symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/get4net

Hormones may affect girls' interests, but not their gender identity or playmates

05/03/2018

Prenatal exposure to male hormones influences which activities girls are interested and engage in, but the effects of those hormones don't extend to gender identity or who they socialize with, according to Penn State researchers.
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Image: microscope photo in purple; Copyright: Kai Hildner

Minimising risks of transplants

02/03/2018

A bone marrow transplant is often the only therapy available to save leukaemia patients, but the risk of complications is high. In spite of devoting considerable time and effort to finding a suitable donor, nearly half of all patients experience an unwanted reaction of their immune system, which often attacks their skin and liver and in up to 50% of cases the intestines.
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Image: fluorescence spectroscopy; Copyright: Christoph Schumacher, dunkelweiss

New Interaction Mechanism of Proteins Discovered

02/03/2018

UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. This new mechanism involves two fully unstructured proteins forming an ultra-high-affinity complex due to their opposite net charge. Proteins usually bind one another as a result of perfectly matching shapes in their three-dimensional structures.
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Image: test tubes; Copyright: Hanna Oksanen, University of Turku

Finnish Research Group Discovers a New Immune System Regulator

01/03/2018

Academy Professor Riitta Lahesmaa’s research group from Turku Centre for Biotechnology of the University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Finland, has discovered a new regulator of the immune system, a key factor that controls development of regulatory T cells.
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Image: man who thoughtfully supports the face on his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Themalni

Depression linked to reduced arginine levels

01/03/2018

People suffering from major depressive disorder, MDD, have reduced arginine levels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Arginine is an amino acid which the body uses to produce, e.g., nitric oxide. Nitric oxide, in turn, is a nervous system and immune defence mediator, and it also plays a role in vascular regulation.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a man with two women in the laboratory; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

Bacteria produce more substances than hitherto assumed

28/02/2018

The bacterium Streptomyces chartreusis is an antibiotic-producing bacterium that releases more metabolites into the surrounding medium than scientists assumed based on the analysis of the genome. Many of the substances are likely released to mediate interactions with its environment. They might also include molecules that are of interest as potential pharmaceutical agents.
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Image: a woman's back with pink tapes on it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Martina Kovacova

New study suggests hormone therapy helps reduce curvature of the spine

27/02/2018

The Women's Health Initiative found that hormone therapy (HT) use was associated with a reduction in vertebral fracture risk. A new study shows these same benefits may also guard against a woman's risk of developing hyperkyphosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that creates a forward stooped posture.
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Image: film cover right, illustrations of the brain left; Copyright: Iiro Jääskeläinen

Film Memento helped uncover how the brain remembers and interprets events from clues

27/02/2018

Key repeating moments in the film give viewers the information they need to understand the storyline. The scenes cause identical reactions in the viewer's brain. The results deepen our understanding of how the brain functions, how narratives work in film, and memory mechanisms impaired by conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: woman measuring her blood sugar; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Female sex not a protective factor against heart disease in type 1 diabetes

26/02/2018

Constrictions of the coronary blood vessels is a possible consequence of type 1 diabetes, and one that can eventually lead to myocardial infarction or heart failure. Generally speaking, women are afflicted by coronary artery disease later than men, but if a woman has type 2 diabetes, the advantage is negated.
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Image: man in a laboratory; Copyright: Helena Hiltunen

Bacteria-eaters to prevent food poisoning? Phages eliminate Yersinia from food

26/02/2018

Bacteria-killing viruses could be employed not just in health care, but also in the food industry, a study conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates. The researchers have been investigating the possibility of utilising phages in eradicating foodborne pathogens and preventing food poisoning.
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08/02/2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: Young female student is sitting between shelves on the floor of a library and reads; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brock Jones

Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22/01/2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04/01/2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pajamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22/11/2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08/11/2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Picture: two women perform exercises and are wired with electrodes; Copyright: University of Erlangen/Wolfgang Kemmler

Whole-body electromyostimulation training: fitness or prevention?

09/10/2017

Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) promises time-efficient muscle strength training that has positive effects after just a few sessions per week. Its objective is a fast increase in muscle mass and reduction of body fat. Can WB-EMS training replace conventional strength and endurance training? And can it help to prevent diseases or pain?
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22/09/2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: woman holding a sketch of a human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Molecular Microsystems: Preventing Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

01/08/2017

An increasing percentage of the world population suffers from chronic inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. Acute attacks often lead to a worsening of the disease and considerably reduce the patient’s lung volume. Nine institutes of a research alliance under the Leibniz Institute umbrella are working on technologies designed to predict and thus prevent exacerbations.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10/07/2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: A physician is holding a globe in his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response

08/06/2017

After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01/06/2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: Black-and-white picture, with some structures of the human body highlighted in color; Copyright: ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern

Cochlear implants: safe procedure thanks to surgical robots

22/05/2017

For many years, cochlear implants have restored a sense of hearing in people with certain types of hearing loss. For surgeons, the implantation requires a precise attention to detail under the microscope. The results for the patients improve significantly with a more precise placement of the electrode array. The use of a surgical robot can increase the accuracy of the procedure.
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Image: A hand tips on a lying tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Koson Rattanaphan

Project A.L.I.N.A: Training in the interdisciplinary emergency room

08/05/2017

How can emergency room associates continue to educate themselves in a fast manner and without bureaucratic hurdles? The A.L.I.N.A Project, which gives associates new tools with special assistance services and learning environments, delivers the solution. We spoke with Prof. Sabine Blaschke at the University Hospital Göttingen about these tools and how they work.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Compass pointing towards the word creativity. In the compass’s center is a ball that shows the Indian flag; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eabff

Technology: India offers potential for research and development

02/05/2017

When it comes to the production and development of tech products, many people immediately think of Germany, Japan, the U.S. or Taiwan. What’s often unknown is that an emerging market like India also offers great potential. After all, the country has a large number of experts and just as much technical knowledge at its disposal.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: Computer-generated graphic showing two hip balls next to each other. Implantation of a sleeve is demonstrated on them; Copyright: revomotion GmbH Köln

Hip joint: sleeve versus endoprosthesis

10/04/2017

People with hip osteoarthritis often suffer from severe pain and only an endoprosthesis implantation can provide relief. This involves a major intervention and long-term rehabilitation because the implant requires the removal of a section of the thigh bone. The "MioHIP" research project looks for an elastic alternative.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01/03/2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22/02/2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08/02/2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Image: Different eye stents lying beside a coin; Copyright: I.Chen

Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01/02/2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: Graphic of an ebola virus against a blue background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/krishna creations

Who am I? Viruses on Nanosprings

21/12/2016

Within the scope of the VIRUSCAN project that is funded by the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program of the European Union, Dr. Charlotte Uetrecht from Hamburg/Germany investigates individual viruses to be able to later identify them on a nanospring structure. MEDICA.de wanted to know: how does this work?
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Image: Zebrafish brain, fluorescence image (left) and 3D image (right); Copyright: private

"A 3D movie of the brain in action"

08/12/2016

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other – for a long time this was possible only to a limited extent. The current techniques can visualize only superficial layers or the imaging they use is too slow. But now, Prof Daniel Razansky and his team have found a new method to visualize the brain activity – by using optoacoustics.
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Image: Eileen Stark prepares Dominik Wetzel for a measurement; Copyright: WHZ/Helge Gerischer

Paraplegia: moving muscles using electrical impulses

22/11/2016

It happens about 1,800 times per year: after a sporting or traffic-related accident, a person’s spinal cord is injured to where nerve tracts are severed and he/she becomes paralyzed. Researchers now want to develop software that measures the brain signals of paralyzed patients and sends out electrical impulses via a system to stimulate muscles, causing them to move again.
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Image: Hand of a person in the hospital bed, next to the call button; Copyright: panthermedia.net/bignai

Being safe: electronic call systems for hospitals

02/11/2016

Call systems: every hospital patient is familiar with them, but hardly anyone gives any thought to how they work. And yet they fulfill an important function because in an emergency, they "call" for help. Just think what might happen if they didn’t work. That is why they are subject to stringent safety regulations. We spoke with D.Eng. Matthias Rychetsky, who is familiar with call systems.
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Image: Graphic of a head within a computer network - many lines and bright colors; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Ostrovsky

My Avatar and Me – the digitization of healthcare records

04/10/2016

So far, avatars could only be found in computer games. But if researchers of the EU-wide www.myhealthavatar.eu project have their way, this could soon change.
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Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
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Image: Open surgery at the forearm of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chanawit Sitthisombat

Hemodialysis: Creating the AV fistula using catheters

08/09/2016

For many patients, the start of hemodialysis marks the lifelong dependency on needing their blood purified. But before they can actually begin treatments, a blood vessel in the patient's arm needs to be enlarged to where it can move enough blood and withstand being connected to the dialysis machine several times per week.
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Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
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Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear

22/08/2016

A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
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Image: User interface of a software; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Cell under observation: "The software lets us study the development on video"

08/08/2016

What happens when stem cells differentiate? What molecular characteristics do they have? Questions that can now be easier answered with the help of a new open-source software. We spoke with Prof. Fabian Theis at the Helmholtz Center Munich, who participated in the software development.
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Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
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Graphic: Hand holds a smartphone, four pictures in the background with rescue situations

Emergency: app alerts first responders

08/06/2016

Just a few minutes can make the difference between life and death when a person loses consciousness or goes into sudden cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, emergency medical services cannot always be on location as fast as needed. To ensure immediate life-sustaining measures, the "mobile rescue" app was developed, which alerts emergency medical responders in the immediate vicinity of an emergency.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ MihaPstock

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Three men pose during an award ceremony

Cardiac insufficiency: early diagnosis with ultrasound

02/05/2016

Heart failure or cardiac insufficiency presents an extra strain on patients because it severally limits everyday performance and deprives them of energy. Due to their intense need for movement, children are particularly strongly affected. However, the disease is frequently not detected until the physical performance is already declining. An early diagnosis could prevent this.
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"

22/03/2016

Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis

08/03/2016

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: Knee implant

Customized Implants cover bones optimally

22/01/2016

It may fits, but somewhere it still tweaks. Although a suit off the rack serves its purpose, it is still far from being an ideal solution. With a custom made heart it is different. It is similar with implants. Often patients complain about the fact that those implants feel strange. 3D printing is on the best way to change this. Here, the implants are adapted to the carrier.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."

08/01/2016

There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Photo: Surgeon uses command devices for a robot

Robotics: surgery with feeling

02/11/2015

Minimally invasive surgeries are gentler on the patient but have one distinct disadvantage for the surgeon: he is not able to interact directly with the operating field. Sometimes he misses impressions that are very important to the success of the intervention. The MiroSurge robot for surgical applications which transmits feedback to the surgeon can help.
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From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy

03/08/2015

Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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Crisis Management: Keeping the big picture in mind

02/03/2015

How should a hospital best respond to an emergency and which types of crises should it be prepared for? We spoke with Professor Ronald Glasberg at the SRH Hochschule Berlin on this subject.
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Photo: Object slides

Tissue storage: "Our top biobanks are internationally leading the charge"

02/02/2015

Only projects with a solid foundation are successful in the long run. This is also true for science. Biobanks are the most important component of this foundation when it comes to fundamental biomedical research: Only high quality tissue samples that are stored there make conclusive research possible - for example in search of the causes of tumorigenesis.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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Wound treatment with fish skin

03/11/2014

The treatment of chronic wounds is extremely problematic. Chronic wounds can take months or years to heal and some even never heal resulting in over 100.000 amputations taking place annually in the US alone. A new technology from Iceland, that is based on fish skin and is already used clinically, allows for improved healing of chronic and burn wounds.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Persistent vegetative state: brain stimulation with laser beams

01/09/2014

The public only notices diseases when celebrities become patients: in the spring of 2014, Formula One driver Michael Schumacher fell into a coma for several months as the result of a head injury caused by a skiing accident. These types of accidents show how delicate the brain responds to injuries. Brain stimulation could possibly support the rehabilitation of vegetative patients.
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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Diagnosing Parkinson's: the skin is revealing

01/07/2014

In patients with Parkinson's, neural cells in the brain die off that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Certain physical symptoms that can indicate the disease follow years later. But a reliable diagnosis can only be made through examination of the brain after the patient's death, and not during his lifetime.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Sports and cancer: no panacea, but a necessary aid

02/06/2014

When are sports healthy, how often should you engage in sports and what effect do sports have on the body – over the past few decades, there were always different answers to these questions. Many studies that were conducted in the past however confirm the assumption that sports and exercise always support health, even if someone is already sick.
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Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"

02/05/2014

Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
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Seminars for physicians: "Physicians are obligated to continue their education for the safety of their patients"

04/03/2014

Continuing education is an integral part of the medical profession, because research continuously delivers new findings that sooner or later make their way into patient treatments. How does an event need to be organized to provide the highest level of benefit for the participants? MEDICA.de spoke with Eva Ningel, Managing Director for beta seminare bonn berlin GmbH (bsbb).
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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Clinical trials: "Registry-embedded clinical trials are the way of the future"

06/01/2014

Even medical risk products are not always tested as thoroughly as would be necessary – be it because of criminal energy, lack of know-how or financial reasons. A revision of clinical trial procedures could not only fix loop holes and methodological flaws. Products and methods could also be brought into general medical care more quickly under new rules.
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