Articles -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

Image: Digital dynamic model of the heart; Copyright: SamaraPolytech

Digital dynamic model of cardiovascular system

18/07/2018

Dmitry Pashchenko, Candidate of Technical Sciences, Assistant Professor of the Industrial Heat-and-Power Engineering Department is the head of the project. From the computer engineering and computational fluid dynamics point of view, the heart is a membrane pump, the vessels are flexible conduits, and the blood is an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid.
Read more
Image: view out of an MRI at seven men looking into the camera; Copyright: Thor Balkhed

Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash

12/07/2018

Researchers at Linköping University have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modelling methods they use have been developed in the motor industry.
Read more
Image: scientists in the laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pressmaster

Predicting heart disease risk with gene editing technology

26/06/2018

Scientists may now be able to predict whether carrying a specific genetic variant increases a person's risk for disease using gene editing and stem cell technologies, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.
Read more
Image: virtual heart on a virtual medical control panel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luca de polo

Simulated procedures on virtual hearts

25/06/2018

How can minimally invasive heart surgery be performed more effectively and more gently with the help of modern data and image processing algorithms? The Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Bremen is working on this question - and has already achieved decisive success.
Read more
Image: plastic heart with a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/shidlovski

'Multiomics' and the mouse heart - New insights into the development of heart disease therapeutics

13/06/2018

The heart of a neonatal mouse is capable of self-repair after tissue damage. However, this ability disappears during the first week of life. Researchers at the University of Helsinki investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial regenerative ability.
Read more
Image: mountain tops covered in snow; Copyright: Dr. Daniela Flueck, University of British Columbia Okanagan

Scientists discover why heart function is reduced at high altitude

12/06/2018

For over a century, we have known that high altitude reduces the amount of blood the heart pumps around the body with each beat. New research published in The Journal of Physiology has unearthed why this is the case and the findings will be important for people who live, travel and exercise at high altitudes.
Read more
Image: Dr. Sonia Lippke; Copyright: Jonas Ginter / WFB

Sleep quality influences performance more than sleep quantity

06/06/2018

A healthy, low-fat diet and undisturbed sleep play an important role in remaining fit and full of energy during the day. Sleep quantity, on the other hand, is of less importance. This is the finding of a recently published study in the journal Health Behavior & Policy Review, which was conducted at Jacobs University Bremen.
Read more
Image: pregnant woman wearing a light pink shirt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/EugeneGensyurovksy

Vast majority of poor, urban women don't use prenatal vitamins

01/06/2018

A study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects.
Read more
Image: transparent human torso, kidney highlighted in red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sciencepics

CU researchers offer insights into liver disease caused by intravenous nutrition

01/06/2018

Research by physician-scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus offers hope for improved quality of life for people who rely on intravenous nutrition due to intestinal damage.
Read more
Image: blood vessel and red blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/the_lightwriter

The vessel not taken: understanding disproportionate blood flow

31/05/2018

Considering the size of red blood cells, a new model for blood flow sheds light on why blood sometimes prefers some vessels over others.
Read more
Image: illustration of DNA strings; Copyright: pixabay.com

The dark side of our genes – healthy ageing in modern times

24/05/2018

The transition to modernity – largely driven by the Industrial Revolution – provided us with easier access to food and clean water, with antibiotics, vaccines, and modern medicine. Yet modernity did not just bring fewer infectious diseases and longer life: it also created an environment radically different from the one we evolved in.
Read more
Image: pair of legs during walking; Copyright: IStock

You walk talks

22/05/2018

The way you walk can reveal current and future health problems. New research from Halmstad University suggests the use of wearable sensors for analysing your movement. This can potentially result in early detection of for example Parkinson's disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis and other neuro-physiological disorders.
Read more
Image: Clusters of MAIT cells in human blood and colon biopsies; Copyright: Department of Biomedicine, Tobias Rutishauser; Copyright: University of Basel

Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteria

18/05/2018

A little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest, as researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the journal Mucosal Immunology.
Read more
Image: PET scan showing clumping proteins in rat hearts (top). The enlarged heart (right) is one with heart failure. Other PET scans showing blood flow; Copyright: Circulation Research, May 11, 2018

Heart failure: The Alzheimer's disease of the heart?

18/05/2018

Protein clumping may contribute to heart failure development and could be used as a diagnostic tool for testing therapies or disease progression.
Read more
Image: blood vessel with red and white blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

New insights into blood vessel growth

16/05/2018

Scientists at the Goethe University have discovered that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
Read more
Image: the letter B made up of vegetables, fruits and leaves; Copyright: panthermedia.net/egal

Hypertensive patients may benefit from folic acid supplements

15/05/2018

Patients with low platelet count and high homocysteine levels reduced first stroke risk by 73 percent with the B vitamin.
Read more
Image: Khodayar Rais-Bahrami with a text about the press release; Copyright: Children's National Health System

COstatus monitor provides direct measure of neonates' cardiac output

10/05/2018

Clinicians caring for vulnerable babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to closely monitor their vital signs, but precisely gauging the function of their tiny hearts has remained elusive.
Read more
Image: two walnuts, one of it half open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dionisvera

Walnuts impact gut microbiome and improve health

09/05/2018

Diets rich in nuts, such as walnuts, have been shown to play a role in heart health and in reducing colorectal cancer. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the way walnuts impact the gut microbiome – the collection of trillions of microbes or bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract – may be behind some of those health benefits.
Read more
Image: young woman holding her head, with a sad expression on her face and black lines emerging from her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIphotography

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCD

04/05/2018

Advances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study by the University of Waterloo.
Read more
Image: smiling man in an office - Subhrangsu Mandal, UTA associate professor of chemistry; Copyright: UTA

UTA researchers investigate link between ovarian hormones and blood cholesterol levels

04/05/2018

Results may open new avenues for treating cardiovascular disease.
Read more
Image: heart muscle and immunostains: wheat germ agglutinin (red), troponin (green) and DAPI (blue; Copyright: Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic/Columbia Engineering

New cell therapy aids heart recovery - without implanting cells

30/04/2018

Columbia biomedical engineers invent innovative technique to help injured hearts regenerate, through therapeutic application of extracellular vesicles secreted by cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells.
Read more
Image: image of a retina; Copyright: Centre for Vision Research, the Westmead Institute for Medical Research

Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease

27/04/2018

New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk.
Read more
Image: ocean view; Copyright: Sarah Bird/Michigan Tech

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular health

27/04/2018

It sounds like a late-night commercial: In just one hour you can reduce your anxiety levels and some heart health risk factors. But a recent study with 14 participants shows preliminary data that even a single session of meditation can have cardiovascular and psychological benefits for adults with mild to moderate anxiety.
Read more
Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
Read more
Image: Mouse cells with (left) or without (right) DOR protein in green and blue ob black ground; Copyright: M. Romero, IRB Barcelona

DOR protein deficiency favours the development of obesity

23/04/2018

Obesity is a world health problem since excessive accumulation of fat tissue (or adipose tissue) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and some types of cancer. However, some obese individuals are less susceptible to these conditions.
Read more
Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03/04/2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
Read more
Image:

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
Read more
Image: A hand touches a smartphone camera that is measuring the heart rate with an app; Copyright: Preventicus GmbH

"Preventicus Heartbeats": An app that's a clinically validated medical device

01/12/2017

Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Yet many incidences of stroke are preventable since they are frequently associated with an undetected abnormal heart rhythm. In this case, patients can benefit from using the clinically validated "Preventicus Heartbeats" app, which measures and documents the heart rhythm with a smartphone camera.
Read more
Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
Read more
Image: Screen showing an image from cardiovascular angiography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fly_wish

Coronary heart disease: non-invasive imaging reduces catheter examinations

01/09/2017

Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause heart arrhythmia, heart insufficiency or heart attack. All the more important is an early, reliable diagnosis that helps to treat it and to reduce risk factors. But what is the best method for diagnosis? A recent study found that functional imaging methods can often spare patients the trouble and risks of a coronary angiography.
Read more
Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
Read more
Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
Read more
Image: Heart-shaped bowl with salt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/grafvision

Sodium intake and blood pressure: too much salt is bad for you. What about too little salt?

01/12/2016

Common salt – or sodium chloride – is essential as a stimulant for nerve conduction. What is more, sodium ions also regulate the water balance in the body. Yet when it came to salt consumption, for the longest time the rule was "less is more". However, a recent study publication calls this belief into question.
Read more
Image: Open surgery at the forearm of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chanawit Sitthisombat

Hemodialysis: Creating the AV fistula using catheters

08/09/2016

For many patients, the start of hemodialysis marks the lifelong dependency on needing their blood purified. But before they can actually begin treatments, a blood vessel in the patient's arm needs to be enlarged to where it can move enough blood and withstand being connected to the dialysis machine several times per week.
Read more
Graphic: Hand holds a smartphone, four pictures in the background with rescue situations

Emergency: app alerts first responders

08/06/2016

Just a few minutes can make the difference between life and death when a person loses consciousness or goes into sudden cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, emergency medical services cannot always be on location as fast as needed. To ensure immediate life-sustaining measures, the "mobile rescue" app was developed, which alerts emergency medical responders in the immediate vicinity of an emergency.
Read more
Photo: Three men pose during an award ceremony

Cardiac insufficiency: early diagnosis with ultrasound

02/05/2016

Heart failure or cardiac insufficiency presents an extra strain on patients because it severally limits everyday performance and deprives them of energy. Due to their intense need for movement, children are particularly strongly affected. However, the disease is frequently not detected until the physical performance is already declining. An early diagnosis could prevent this.
Read more
Photo: Three-dimensional model of the right ventricle

Ultrasound: four dimensions for pediatric cardiac diagnostics

01/03/2016

Fortunately, only a handful of newborns are affected by them, though this determines if not the rest of their lives then, at least, the first few years of affected children: congenital heart defects. After the necessary surgeries, the small patients repeatedly need to return for checkups. Until now, these were conducted using MRI scans. 4D ultrasound can be an alternative.
Read more

ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
Read more

Transcatheter Pacing System: The world’s smallest cardiac pacemaker

01/07/2015

In the case of cardiac arrhythmia, the normal heart rate gets out of balance due to various reasons. In some cases, it is necessary to implant a cardiac pacemaker. Just like with any intervention, this type of surgery also involves risks. In the worst-case scenario, this can lead to abnormal wound healing or obliteration of the vascular system.
Read more

Wanted: rapid test to prevent deep vein thrombosis

01/07/2015

Deep vein thrombosis is not just a risk factor for frequent flyers but also for wearers of cardiovascular implants and newly operated patients. Blood thinners prevent these dangerous blood clots from forming, but they need to be carefully adjusted and do not work the same way in every patient. A detailed analysis of platelets (thrombocytes) could prevent complications in the future.
Read more

MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE: Preventing diabetes from affecting the kidneys

03/11/2014

November 14, 2014 is World Diabetes Day – and MEDICA is also concerned with this metabolic disorder: several lectures at the MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE are dedicated to the so-called “sugar disease” that affects 382 million people worldwide. The Conference addresses the damages caused by the disease, its prevention and therapy.
Read more

Vascular health in athletes

02/06/2014

"Sports are good for your health", as the saying goes. Regular exercise promotes the health of our blood vessels and prevents vascular diseases. However, many years of competitive sports can also have negative effects on vascular health and increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Prof. Martin Halle of the Technical University Munich explains at MEDICA.de what athletes need to pay attention to.
Read more

Football: "We want to globally determine deaths for the first time"

02/06/2014

Sudden deaths of football players make headlines time after time: competitive athletes who are the idols of many people die just when they are on the playing field and in the limelight. Congenital heart defects often cause their death. Sports physicians and FIFA now plan to ascertain data that can help improve preventive examinations in competitive football.
Read more