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Image: Paramedics that transport a man towards an ambulance; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Artur Verkhovetskiy

Video streaming, apps, and smart glasses: telemedicine on standby

02/07/2018

Looking at the trends and innovations in emergency medicine, it is apparent that the idea of an ambulance as a kind of mobile emergency room that comes to patients, connects them with health professionals and makes a diagnosis en route to the hospital, is gaining momentum. The increased usage of telemedicine plays a big part in this development.
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Image: middle-aged woman drinking alcohol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kzenon

How does alcohol influence the development of Alzheimer's disease?

11/06/2018

Research from the University of Illinois at Chicago has found that some of the genes affected by alcohol and inflammation are also implicated in processes that clear amyloid beta - the protein that forms globs of plaques in the brain and which contributes to neuronal damage and the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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Image: histological image of colon sections from mice that received T cells from CD4-creERafl/fl mice; Copyright: University of Turku

Estrogen and T cell immune response linked to autoimmune inflammation

11/06/2018

Women are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists from Turku Center for Biotechnology and University of Georgia reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01/06/2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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Image: Worldwide expansion of the two invasive mosquito species a) Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and b) yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti); Copyright: Dorian D. Dörge (Goethe University)

Asian tiger mosquito on the move

28/05/2018

Invasion has a long tradition and is being accelerated by globalisation, trade and tourism.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: wooden spoon with fish oil pills; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sommaill

Symptoms of osteoarthritis lessened with simple changes to the diet

17/05/2018

One gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study in Rheumatology reports.
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Image: smiling young woman - Laura Volpicelli-Daley; Copyright: UAB

Untangling brain neuron dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

17/05/2018

A neuron model of Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementias shows defects that could suggest treatments to halt or reverse cognitive impairments before the neurons die.
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Image: blood vessel with red and white blood cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vampy1

New insights into blood vessel growth

16/05/2018

Scientists at the Goethe University have discovered that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury and in so doing make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
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Image: the letter B made up of vegetables, fruits and leaves; Copyright: panthermedia.net/egal

Hypertensive patients may benefit from folic acid supplements

15/05/2018

Patients with low platelet count and high homocysteine levels reduced first stroke risk by 73 percent with the B vitamin.
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Image: Nurse in the foreground, behind whom four other nurses are placed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/minervastock

For more recognition of nurses – International Nurses Day 2018

11/05/2018

The International Nurses Day takes place worldwide every year on 12 May. Tomorrow, Saturday, numerous events and activities will therefore be offered to highlight the importance of this area of healthcare. The aim is not only to give caregivers all over the world attention but also recognition.
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Image: vessels of the retina; Copyright: Michael Chiang/OHSU

AI better than most human experts at detecting cause of preemie blindness

03/05/2018

New algorithm could help overcome shortage of physicians trained in disease diagnosis.
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Image: Three-dimensional structures of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; Copyright: Hibbs Lab, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Cryo-EM structures of the nicotine receptor may lead to new therapies for addiction

03/05/2018

UT Southwestern researchers today published in Nature atomic-scale blueprints of the most abundant class of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A structural understanding of the protein, found in neurons, could lead to new ways to treat nicotine addiction from smoking and vaping.
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Image: human eye, focus on the retina; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hquality

Strategy prevents blindness in mice with retinal degeneration

02/05/2018

More than 2 million people worldwide live with inherited and untreatable retinal conditions, including retinitis pigmentosa, which slowly erodes vision.
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Image: toddler who gets vaccinated in the arms of a nurse; Copyright: panthermedia.net/evgenyataman

European Immunization Week 2018 – the right to be protected or the duty to protect?

23/04/2018

The European Immunization Week's general slogan "Prevent. Protect. Immunize" is more relevant than ever in times of globalization and migration. It is a political and structural challenge to give as many people as possible access to vaccination. But even the best care is of no use if the individual does not recognize his or her duty to society.
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Image: Man with stethoscope and medical symbols; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Between austerity measures and growth pressure - Latin America's medical market

03/04/2018

A region whose states make up the world's third largest economy and which has few linguistic differences - Latin America is an attractive market for foreign companies at first glance. This also applies to the medical market. However, various factors are contributing to the fact that this market is growing only slowly in most countries.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01/02/2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: Young female student is sitting between shelves on the floor of a library and reads; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brock Jones

Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22/01/2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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Image: View into a cockpit over the shoulders of the pilots; Copyright: panthermedia.net/natamc

Intensive care medicine: More safety thanks to aviation knowledge

08/12/2017

What do intensive care medicine and aviation have in common? In both fields, mistakes can quickly put people's lives at risk. That's why high safety standards should be a matter of course for both. Having said that, medicine lags behind by comparison because staff members often lack the opportunities to train for emergency situations and the proper tools to prevent patients from being harmed.
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Image: Male hands keep Smartwatch and Smartphone with the same health application side by side; Copyright: panthermedia. net/Alexey Boldin

mHealth: Doctor in your pocket

02/10/2017

Since the eHealth Law took effect on January 1, 2016, it has become apparent that digitization also affects the healthcare system. Its objective is to improve the digital infrastructure of healthcare. For several years, a subcategory of electronic healthcare solutions has enjoyed increasing popularity: mHealth.
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Image: Entrance hall of the MEDICA

New Additions to MEDICA 2017 – MEDICA LABMED FORUM, MEDICA START-UP PARK, and MEDICA ACADEMY

02/10/2017

This year, expect a series of exciting innovations that include the informative and practice-oriented MEDICA ACADEMY, the START-UP PARK for newcomers and networkers from the startup arena and the interdisciplinary MEDICA LABMED Forum.
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Image: A large stone is blocking a path that leads through a green meadow; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brigitte Götz

Medical devices: the road to the finished product is not easy

08/09/2017

These days, many groups make various demands of medical device developers: manufacturers, users, patients and government agencies. Given all of these interests and concerns, the developers face many challenges. In this interview, we put some of them under the microscope and examine how they can be sidestepped or entirely avoided.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01/09/2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03/07/2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: A physician is holding a globe in his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response

08/06/2017

After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01/06/2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: Several people use the Armeo system and playing a videogame with it; Copyright: Hocoma, Schweiz

Exoskeletons, Serious Games and Co.: New Technologies in Rehabilitation

01/06/2017

A stroke, an accident or just because you are aging – there are many reasons to take advantage of physiotherapeutic or rehabilitative measures. More and more new technologies are designed to support patients in this process. They run the gamut from sensor technology and robotics to exergames and virtual reality.
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Image: Two elderly are sitting beside each other, looking on a screen, where a bingo game can be seen. One woman is standing up; Copyright: SilverFit, Robert ten Berge

SilverFit – Training and gaming for the elderly

01/06/2017

Movement is good for health, but people do it less and less as they age. The Dutch company SilverFit wants to counteract this. Their devices that combine sport and game are primarily aimed at elderly people. Their goal: to give people joy, fun and motivation to move – both in rehabilitation and in daily life.
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Image: Man typing on virtual question marks; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sebastien decoret

FAQ: Some questions concerning India

02/05/2017

There are recurring questions that companies are seeking to invest or produce in India. Here are some questions and their answers.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24/04/2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: Children playing outside, getting wet in the water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Pneumonia in Children: Ultrasound or X-Rays?

08/03/2017

Pneumonia is the most frequent respiratory disease in children and can even cause death. That is why it is extremely important to make an accurate diagnosis as quickly as possible. If this requires imaging tests, normally X-rays are taken. But there is an alternative: ultrasound.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01/03/2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08/02/2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Image: Different eye stents lying beside a coin; Copyright: I.Chen

Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01/02/2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Image: Two people are sitting in a room, looking at a screen; Copyright: Rhön-Klinikum, ZTM Bad Kissingenrmedia.net/SimpleFoto

Project TeleView – Telemedicine for refugees

23/01/2017

Refugees who come to Germany struggle with language and cultural barriers – also when it comes to medical issues. Patients are often not able to state their medical history or acute conditions, which requires extra time and means increased costs for medical offices and shelters. The telemedicine project TeleView seeks to offer a solution to this problem.
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Image: Single room with a window in a hospital; Copyright: panthermedia.net/epstock

Hospital construction: infection prevention through architecture?

09/01/2017

Hospitals apply many infection prevention and control measures. They all have one thing in common: they are individual parts of an overall concept that is aimed at preventing the spread of highly infectious and resistant pathogens in hospitals. Nevertheless, previous hygiene concepts ignore one aspect of hospitals: the architecture of the actual hospital facility itself.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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Image: Boy lies in a hospitalbed and is looking up to a doctor whose hand lies on the boy's shoulder; Copyright: panthermedia.net/spotmatikphoto

"Always be honest" – How to communicate with critically ill children

02/01/2017

When children suffer from a critical or terminal illness, the first impulse of adults is often to not tell the children and sugarcoat the situation. Yet it is just this type of behavior that frequently causes children to emotionally withdraw.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02/01/2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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Image: Graphic of an ebola virus against a blue background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/krishna creations

Who am I? Viruses on Nanosprings

21/12/2016

Within the scope of the VIRUSCAN project that is funded by the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program of the European Union, Dr. Charlotte Uetrecht from Hamburg/Germany investigates individual viruses to be able to later identify them on a nanospring structure. MEDICA.de wanted to know: how does this work?
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Image: Drawing of a human body, written down are risks for diabetics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/marigranula

Heart attacks in diabetics – a special danger

01/12/2016

Diabetics are not only schooled in getting a handle on their blood glucose levels, but also in looking out for possible complications. One complication of diabetes is nerve damage. It is often responsible for the so-called "diabetic foot". Something many people are not aware of is that the heart can also be put at risk by nerve damage.
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Image: Eileen Stark prepares Dominik Wetzel for a measurement; Copyright: WHZ/Helge Gerischer

Paraplegia: moving muscles using electrical impulses

22/11/2016

It happens about 1,800 times per year: after a sporting or traffic-related accident, a person’s spinal cord is injured to where nerve tracts are severed and he/she becomes paralyzed. Researchers now want to develop software that measures the brain signals of paralyzed patients and sends out electrical impulses via a system to stimulate muscles, causing them to move again.
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Image: In the middle of a computer window is written in big white letters Diabetes. A hand is tapping onto the word; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pichet Wissawapipat

Telediabetology: Telemedicine to fight diabetes

02/11/2016

World Diabetes Day is on November 14 of this year. This is reason enough to get informed about the options available in medicine on the subject of "diabetes". One area is telediabetology, a combination of telemedicine and diabetology. It is still not widespread in Germany, but that is about to change because the benefits for patients, physicians and hospitals are obvious.
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Image: Hand of a person in the hospital bed, next to the call button; Copyright: panthermedia.net/bignai

Being safe: electronic call systems for hospitals

02/11/2016

Call systems: every hospital patient is familiar with them, but hardly anyone gives any thought to how they work. And yet they fulfill an important function because in an emergency, they "call" for help. Just think what might happen if they didn’t work. That is why they are subject to stringent safety regulations. We spoke with D.Eng. Matthias Rychetsky, who is familiar with call systems.
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Image: Woman lying along on a couch. Her right leg is moved by a man standing next to her; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia

Preoperative rehabilitation: Fit for surgery

24/10/2016

Preoperative rehabilitation is gaining importance in medicine. It helps to prepare patients for upcoming treatments and surgeries, thereby reducing risks and complications during surgery and making faster rehabilitation possible.
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Image: A 3D stick figure creates a mind map about

A new broom sweeps clean? The new EU Medical Device Regulation

10/10/2016

The year 2016 brings about the new, eagerly anticipated Medical Device Regulation (MDR). The revision needs to now be implemented by all EU member states in the coming years after there have been ongoing deliberations and negotiations since October 2012.
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Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
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Image: Graphic of a head within a computer network - many lines and bright colors; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Ostrovsky

My Avatar and Me – the digitization of healthcare records

04/10/2016

So far, avatars could only be found in computer games. But if researchers of the EU-wide www.myhealthavatar.eu project have their way, this could soon change.
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Image: Different medical symbols are seen like on a screen. A hand wearing a white glove taps on a symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Networked healthcare – Apps and co.

04/10/2016

Digitization is on the rise and doesn't even stop with medicine. A video doctor consultation, a fitness app or a collection of data for a better cancer treatment: eHealth combines the possibilities of the internet with the demands of medicine and opens up entirely new possibilities for the medical industry.
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Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
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Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear

22/08/2016

A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
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Photo: Children play soccer in a park

Hard work pays off: even sick people benefit from physical activity

01/07/2016

Children instinctively know this – exercising is fun, makes you happy and keeps you fit. This begs the question of when and why this innate love for movement dwindles in many of us as we get older. After all, diseases like type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure can be considerably controlled with sufficient exercise.
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Photo: Two people with recumbent bikes during a race; Copyright: ETH Zürich/Alessandro Della Bella

Cybathlon: A new type of competition for people with disabilities

01/07/2016

Technical means that lend superpowers to humans are quite normal in comics and movies. In reality, their purpose is much more mundane: They are supposed to help people with disabilities in everyday life. MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE, that takes place at MEDICA in November, is dealing with this topic, too.
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Photo: ; Copyright: Wearable Technologies

MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2016

01/07/2016

More than 30 companies will again show the latest healthcare wearables. The 4th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE has established as the hot spot for innovations in sports medicine.
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Photo: Hospital  bed

Textiles used in hospitals and medical offices – germs don’t stand a chance

01/06/2016

Some hospitals have long banned the status symbol of physicians – the white coat. Research has shown that especially the sleeves were contaminated with various types of bacteria. But it’s not just lab coats that can spread germs in healthcare settings. This field uses a variety of different textiles. Wouldn’t it, therefore, make sense to apply antimicrobial finishes?
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Photo: physicians at station

Gram-negative bacteria pose a major challenge for hospitals

01/06/2016

Every day, people are admitted to the hospital, discharged or they visit patients. This large number of people increases the risk of bacteria transmission. Preventative measures such as short-sleeved uniforms and copper surfaces can help by improving hospital hygiene but they cannot replace the legal requirements for hygiene measures.
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Photo: ceramic joints

Knee at your fingertips

22/04/2016

How can you print ceramics, what purpose do they have and how benefits medical technology? Answers provides Dr. Tassilo Moritz from Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."

08/01/2016

There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
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Photo: Magnet draws zigzag lines

Magnetogenetics: how neural stem cells grow in a certain direction

01/12/2015

If you could stimulate brain cells to grow in a specific direction, you would probably be able to achieve a significant improvement in the health of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. This is why the MAGNEURON project focuses on this approach. The EU is funding the project with approximately 3.5 million Euros.
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Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation

02/11/2015

Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
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Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
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Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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A wearable to draw a complete picture of the heart

01/09/2015

Smartphone apps and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices. Self-monitoring therefore is one of the core strategies for changing cardiovascular health behaviors. On the other side, patients benefit from sharing their data with doctors and electronic health record (EHR) systems.
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Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy

03/08/2015

Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
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ECG measurements: "Our chest strap moistens itself"

01/07/2015

When measuring myocardial activity, it is important for the skin to always stay moist under the electrodes of the ECG. Only then can data be consistently transferred. Athletes have an easier time with this: they are used to sweating. This is a lot harder for older patients.
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Transcatheter Pacing System: The world’s smallest cardiac pacemaker

01/07/2015

In the case of cardiac arrhythmia, the normal heart rate gets out of balance due to various reasons. In some cases, it is necessary to implant a cardiac pacemaker. Just like with any intervention, this type of surgery also involves risks. In the worst-case scenario, this can lead to abnormal wound healing or obliteration of the vascular system.
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Lung cancer: A blood test evaluates the effectiveness of therapy

01/06/2015

Can liquid biopsies become the new trend in cancer diagnostics? The medical world has asked this question for quite some time. The first globally approved liquid biopsy-based test for lung cancer shows that this can work. Yet further findings and research are still required to establish this less invasive method in diagnostics.
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Tumor markers: State-of-the-art diagnostics for personalized medicine

01/06/2015

When cancer is diagnosed, the terms tumor markers or biomarkers keep popping up. They describe characteristics that are not found in healthy persons. The classic tumor markers can be easily detected in blood samples or other body fluids. Other analysis methods require more effort. Yet they all share one thing in common: biomarkers indicate a potential tumor.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"

04/05/2015

Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
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Statutory Skin Cancer Screening: "This is not just about mortality rates"

04/05/2015

Since the end of April 2015, the long-awaited evaluation report on the skin cancer screening programs offered by German health insurance providers is now finally available. We spoke with Dr. Ralph von Kiedrowski, Board Member of the German Dermatologist Association (German: Berufsverband Deutscher Dermatologen) on what the screening can accomplish and his take on the G-BA report.
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The patient's perspective is also important for physicians

01/04/2015

Communication is the key to success when it comes to the patient-physician relationship. Compared to the past however, this relationship has changed somewhat: although physicians are still the experts, thanks to the internet and popular science, patients now also know more about health and diseases. An "informed patient" is not a problem for physicians, but rather a source of better understanding.
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Physician and patient: A complicated relationship

01/04/2015

The doctor-patient relationship isn’t always easy. On the one hand is the physician, who is responsible for helping many patients. On the other hand is the patient, who visits the doctor in the hopes of his or her problem being treatable. Things always get difficult when one of them feels that they don’t see eye-to-eye. And this happens a lot.
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Photo: Child in hospital

Pediatric pathology: Specialized knowledge for the youngest

02/02/2015

When children are sick, their parents take them to a pediatrician. A pediatric pathologist is needed when pathology exams need to be conducted. This branch of pathology requires specialized knowledge. The Society for Pediatric and Fetal Pathologists is championing the transfer and preservation of this knowledge.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Photo: Bacteria

Fecal microbiota transplantation: A stranger’s stool heals inflammatory bowel disease

05/01/2015

It sounds strange: During fecal microbiota transplantation, the stool of a healthy donor is transferred into the intestines of a diseased patient to restore his or her damaged gut flora. This is an entirely normal process in the animal kingdom. Now the stool transplant has established itself as the standard for treating Clostridium difficile.
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“When patient monitoring becomes too intensive, it violates human dignity and human rights“

01/12/2014

Modern medical technology shortens and makes care processes easier, while it ensures the safety of patients at the same time. However, monitoring or electronic sensors for remote surveillance keep being accompanied by ethical violations. Patients feel like they are being watched and in the worst-case scenario, robbed of their freedom and autonomy.
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Euthanasia – A Human Right?

01/12/2014

Several weeks ago on November 1, 2014, 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who suffered from terminal brain cancer, took drugs to end her life surrounded by her family. This was preceded by months of despair and anguish, but also by love and a lust for life as the young woman describes in several videos she recorded to fight for the right to die with dignity.
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Making Your Own End-of-Life Decisions: “All options of palliative care, pain management and continued life need to have been explained to the patient“

01/12/2014

How does a physician handle a patient, who wants to die and what rights do I actually have as a patient? Legal practitioners do not automatically answer these and other questions. We talked about this subject with MD-PhD Ralf Jox from the Institute of Ethics, History and Theory of Medicine at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
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Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation

01/10/2014

On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
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Pediatric anesthesia: "I would object to a specialty medical training"

01/09/2014

When very young children already need to be in the operating room, it’s not just the parents that are concerned. This type of situation is a special challenge for the entire operating team, because children are always very special patients - especially since they are not just simply small grown-ups!
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Multi-resistant bacteria want to conquer the world

01/08/2014

Bacteria lurk everywhere: on the skin, in the intestines and in every puddle. Most of them that are hanging out in the human body are good bacteria. But not all of them. Those pathogens that exhibit resistance and are thus very hard to combat are the most dangerous kind. Their spread threatens people all over the world.
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Fat is the best medicine: "Adipose tissue contains many multipotent stem cells, approximately 500 times more than bone marrow"

01/07/2014

The not so popular “love handles“ could revolutionize medicine in the near future. In cooperation with the University of Rostock (Professor Hermann Seitz), the human med AG Company currently seeks to develop a device that is able to gently remove adipose tissue during surgery and subsequently isolate stem cells.
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Sports and cancer: no panacea, but a necessary aid

02/06/2014

When are sports healthy, how often should you engage in sports and what effect do sports have on the body – over the past few decades, there were always different answers to these questions. Many studies that were conducted in the past however confirm the assumption that sports and exercise always support health, even if someone is already sick.
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mHealth Alliance: "Mobile health has the potential to improve healthcare for millions"

02/05/2014

Whether in remote areas or in a large city – people everywhere need good healthcare. Thanks to mobile health, more and more people can get medical help, even in poor regions of the world.
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Medical apps: functionality and safety is key

02/05/2014

Successful communication is most important in medicine. The most modern channels have been utilized in this area for quite some time now. Medical apps need to meet several requirements at once. For their use to pay off, they need to be beneficial for prevention or therapy. And to ensure a safe application, they also need to be both technically and medically flawless.
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Mobile assistance systems: "The device automatically notifies if something is not right"

02/05/2014

Staying active and mobile when you are old – who doesn’t want that? People suffering from dementia can often only dream about that. The fear of not finding your way back home or not getting any help in an emergency severally restricts many affected people in the way they live their lives. Yet there are many people, who could still independently participate in life despite mild dementia.
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Seminars for physicians: "Physicians are obligated to continue their education for the safety of their patients"

04/03/2014

Continuing education is an integral part of the medical profession, because research continuously delivers new findings that sooner or later make their way into patient treatments. How does an event need to be organized to provide the highest level of benefit for the participants? MEDICA.de spoke with Eva Ningel, Managing Director for beta seminare bonn berlin GmbH (bsbb).
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Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"

03/02/2014

Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. MEDICA.de spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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