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Image: Two physicians in front of a computer; Copyright: Tohoku University

Imaging: A peek into lymph nodes

18/03/2019

A new method to diagnose cancer cells inside lymph nodes could allow doctors to treat cancers before they spread around the body
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Image: bioengineer Dr Chih-Tsung Yang pictured with the microfluidic cell culture chip in the foreground; Copyright: Joe Vittorio

Organ-on-a-chip: reducing side effects of radiotherapy

15/03/2019

The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers. UniSA biomedical engineer Professor Benjamin Thierry is leading an international study using organ-on-a-chip technology to develop 3D models to test the effects of different levels and types of radiation.
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Image: graphic showing how Usiigaci works; Copyright: OIST

Machine learning tracks moving cells

14/03/2019

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists have long struggled to quantify the movement and changing morphology of cells through time, but now, scientists have devised an elegant tool to do just that.
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Image: physician shows pregnant woman her ultrasound images; Copyright: ByLove

Imaging: revealing life-threatening pregnancy disorder

13/03/2019

An imaging technique used to detect some forms of cancer can also help detect preeclampsia in pregnancy before it becomes a life-threatening condition, a new Tulane study says.
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Image: SniffPhone prototype; Copyright: JLM Innovation GmbH

mHealth: SniffPhone detects cancer from breath

12/03/2019

SniffPhone, currently in its prototype phase, enables early diagnosis of gastric cancer from a person's exhaled breath. The new method may revolutionise cancer screening all over the world. VTT has participated to the development of SniffPhone prototype and concept with nine other project partners.
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Image: older man in a lab coat at the computer in the laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Viktor Cap

Computer kidney could provide safer tests for new medications

11/03/2019

A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of the first computational model of the human kidney. The new model will allow scientists to gain better insights into how new drugs that target the kidney, such as diabetes medication, may work.
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Image: woman working with microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Fabrice Michaudeau

'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster

05/03/2019

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device invented by researchers at the University of Kansas, The University of Kansas Cancer Center and KU Medical Center could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.
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Image: digital brain in human hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ sdecoret

Artificial intelligence platform to detect neurodegenerative diseases

05/03/2019

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence platform to detect a range of neurodegenerative disease in human brain tissue samples, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Their discovery will help scientists develop targeted biomarkers and therapeutics, resulting in a more accurate diagnosis.
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Image: The image on the left shows a normal cell while the one on the right highlights one of the discovered genes in neuroblastoma; Copyright: Troyanskaya Lab

Machine learning: Tool reveals molecular causes of disease

04/03/2019

Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01/03/2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: An illustration of the brain with the structure of a molecule in front of it; Copyright: MIT

MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain

01/03/2019

Calcium is a critical signaling molecule for most cells, and it is especially important in neurons. Imaging calcium in brain cells can reveal how neurons communicate with each other; however, current imaging techniques can only penetrate a few millimeters into the brain.
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Endoprostheses - Ultrasound to detect loosening?

27/02/2019

Many patients suffering from arthrosis or other kinds of damage in the hip joint need an endoprosthesis at some point. However, this prosthesis can loosen again after some time, so that it must be replaced. In order to delay this replacement surgery for as long as possible, the TH Mittelhessen University of Applied Sciences develops a new diagnostic method.
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Image: A blood sample is taken from young blonde woman in a blue shirt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Robotic sensor technology diagnoses reproductive health problems

26/02/2019

The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly and cheaply than current methods.
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Image: Grey shaded images of a human's vascular system; Copyright: Kim C, Lee JS, Han Y, et al.

Imaging: PET/CT agent promises better VTE diagnosis

20/02/2019

A first-in-human study featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine reports that the novel positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) tracer 18F-GP1 showed excellent image quality and a high detection rate for the diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE).
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Image: A young woman with a half-transparent sticker tattoo at her arm; Copyright: ICFO

Graphene-based wearables for health monitoring

20/02/2019

The first of ICFO's devices on display will allow customers to monitor their level of exposure to sunlight through a UV sensor. Designed as a flexible, transparent and disposable patch, it connects to a mobile device and alerts the user once he or she has reached a defined threshold of sun exposure.
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Image: A table with a laptop and a smartphone; Copyright:panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Gaming technologies can help cancer patients

19/02/2019

Lancaster University is sharing in a €4m project to use gaming technology to improve the care of both adults and children with cancer.
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Image: The two light paths of a cell; Copyright:Yen Strandqvist

Holographic microscopy to investigate cell stress

19/02/2019

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have devised a new method to study how single biological cells react to stressful situations. Understanding these responses could help develop more effective drugs for serious diseases.
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Image:  robot hand taps on a computer keyboard; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

AI can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients

18/02/2019

The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne, has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods.
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Image: Dennis Eickelbeck (left) and Stefan Herlitze make cells glow - with so-called optogenetics.; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

Thanks to light: Controlling and visualizing

18/02/2019

Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualised serotonin receptor signals in neural cells.
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Image: robot with one finger on its head, next to it a brain made of luminous neurons; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

New AI toolkit is the 'scientist that never sleeps'

15/02/2019

Researchers have developed a new AI-driven platform that can analyse how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist. The platform, HRMAn ('Herman'), which stands for Host Response to Microbe Analysis, is open-source, easy-to-use and can be tailored for different pathogens including Salmonella enterica.
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Image: Laptop with an ECG on its screen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/scanrail

Novel software to reduce arrhythmic heart disease

14/02/2019

The heart's pumping ability is controlled by electrical activity that triggers the heart muscle cells to contract and relax. In certain heart diseases such as arrhythmia, the organ's electrical activity is affected.
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Image: two physicians discuss something on a tablet, an MRI device in the background; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

MRI and computer modeling reveals how wrist bones move

14/02/2019

We use our wrists constantly, but how do they work? In a just-published Journal of Biomechanics article, the researchers proved a longtime assumption about individuals' right and left wrists, while also finding differences between wrists of males and females: discoveries that could help inform and guide future treatments.
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Image: three clinicians in the lab in front of a computer.; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Machine learning predicts unnecessary surgeries

13/02/2019

Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is a breast lesion associated with a four- to five-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. ADH is primarily found using mammography and identified on core needle biopsy. Despite multiple passes of the lesion during biopsy, only portions of the lesions are sampled.
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Where imaging and radiation meet – Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac

13/02/2019

In conventional radiotherapy, the tumor is first localized using CT and MRT images in order to calculate the irradiated areas. The major drawback in this case: the subsequent radiation only shows bone structures in the body but not the tumor itself. As a result, the radiated area is often larger than necessary. In our video you will learn how the MR-Linac can be used for more precise radiotherapy.
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Image: two men in front of a screen presenting the electrodes on the head to target epilepsy; Copyright: Bart van Overbeeke

Targeting epilepsy with electrodes on the head

13/02/2019

Stimulating the brain with implanted electrodes is a successful, but very drastic measure. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Kempenhaeghe, Philips and Gent University will therefore be working on a method to stimulate the brain using electrodes that are placed on the head rather than inside it. Their goal is to customize treatment for patients with severe epilepsy.
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Image: two men in the laboratory talking about a document in their hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Phovoi R.

Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs

12/02/2019

Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease.
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Image: Xiangyu Deng in the laboratory; Copyright: UGA

Machine learning to ID source of Salmonella

12/02/2019

A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
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Image: Big Data; Copyright: panthermedia.net / putilich

Big data approach evaluates autism treatments

08/02/2019

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
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Image: robotik hand with stetoskope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / VitalikRadko

Gummy-like robots prevent disease

08/02/2019

Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury. The controlled application of such stimuli to living tissues in vivo and in vitro has now proven instrumental to studying the conditions that lead to disease.
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Image: cancer growing inside the pancreatic duct of a mouse; Copyright: Hendrik Massal, Francis Crick Institute

3D imaging technique reveals pancreatic cancers start

05/02/2019

A new technique to study tissue samples in 3D has revealed that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, solving a decades-old mystery of how tumours form. The new method could help researchers to get more information from tissue biopsies and may lead to improved treatments for pancreatic cancers. The technique was developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute.
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Image: Doctor AIzimov – an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics; Copyright: Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University

New intelligent system for lung cancer diagnostics

04/02/2019

Researches from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Russian Academic Excellence Initiative participant, in collaboration with the radiologists from St.Petersburg Clinical Research for Specialized Types of Medical Care have developed an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics. It analyzes patients' computed tomography (CT) results within 20 seconds.
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Image: Woman jogging on the beach and crab loop; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Rawpixel

Act(ive) against cancer - World Cancer Day 2019

04/02/2019

On February 4th is World Cancer Day. The World Cancer Organization (UICC) launched this day in 2007 to raise awareness of various cancers. This year, the focus lies in particular on the prevention and early detection of cancer. In addition, people will be informed about diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up options.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Schematical drawing to explain a blood test; Copyright: NHLBI

Can a blood test detect lung-transplant rejection?

29/01/2019

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident.
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Image: An older man and an older woman in a swimming pool; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Zoltan Okolicsanyi

The healing effect of radon

29/01/2019

Natural thermal water that contains radon has been used for over 100 years to treat chronic degenerative, inflammatory and musculoskeletal conditions. Most patients experience a significant reduction in pain after treatment with radon, but the molecular mechanisms behind the treatment are largely unexplored.
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Image: A girl balances a pink fidget spinner at the tip of her finger; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Fidget spinner separates blood plasma

28/01/2019

Some people use fidget spinners - flat, multi-lobed toys with a ball bearing at the center - to diffuse nervous energy or whirl away stress. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for the toys: separating blood plasma for diagnostic tests.
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Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25/01/2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: A man and a woman in the laboratory; Copyright:A. Battenberg / TUM

Evolution of signaling molecules

24/01/2019

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.
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Image: black-white-photo of an old woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ photographee eu

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

23/01/2019

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease manifest, the brain starts changing and neurons are slowly degraded.
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Image: blood vessel system in bones; Copyright: UDE/Matthias Gunzer, Annika Grüneboom

New blood vessel system discovered in bones

23/01/2019

A previously unknown network of fine capillaries directly connecting the bone marrow with the circulation of the periosteum has been discovered.
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Image: Healthy mucus layer (red) keeping Escherichia coli (green) at a safe distance within the colon, preventing them from breaking throug; Copyright: Bahtiyar Yilmaz, University of Bern

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

22/01/2019

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.
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Image: human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/net ilexx

Molecular profiling could catch lung cancer

22/01/2019

The world's first genetic sequencing of precancerous lung lesions could pave the way for very early detection and new treatments, reports a new study led by UCL researchers.
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Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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Image: man having a heart attack; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kzenon

Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

21/01/2019

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.
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Image: index finger of a hand points to a printed text; Copyright: panthermedia.net / j.dudzinski

AI approach outperformed experts in identifying cervical precancer

11/01/2019

A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has developed a computer algorithm that can analyze digital images of a woman's cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention. This artificial intelligence (AI) approach, called automated visual evaluation.
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Image: esophageal tumors; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

Mapping residual esophageal tumors - a glimpse into the future?

10/01/2019

It's one of the first questions asked by many cancer patients "What are my chances of beating this?" Often there is no clear answer, with survival rates differing widely. Post-operative testing that provides an accurate prediction of long-term treatment outcomes is the next best thing, allowing clinicians to plan further treatment and more accurately inform patients about their prognoses.
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Image: Killer T cells attack an infectious cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Andreus

How herpesviruses shape the immune system

09/01/2019

Cytomegalovirus is widespread and remains in the body for a lifetime after infection. In healthy individuals, this virus is usually kept in check but can become dangerous when the immune system is weakened or during pregnancy. DZIF scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
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Image: MRSA-Text on the keyboard on which lies a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / masuti

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks

08/01/2019

A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread.
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Image: Philip Miller with the new microneedle technique; Copyright: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories

Microneedles technique for quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

08/01/2019

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw - usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle - might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, according to new research.
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Image: Label-free intraoperative nonlinear imaging of the tumor microenvironment; Copyright: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

07/01/2019

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Prof. Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room by using a new portable optical imaging system. This work marks a major step toward providing cancer researchers with a tool for tracking tumor progression.
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Image: breath test for multiple cancers; Copyright: Owlstone Medical Ltd

Clinical trial launches to develop breath test for multiple cancers

07/01/2019

Researchers have launched a clinical trial to develop a breath test, analysing molecules that could indicate the presence of cancer at an early stage. This is the first test of its kind to investigate multiple cancer types.
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Image: Three researchers standing in a laboratory; Credit: KAUST

Paper sensors remove the sting of diabetic testing

03/01/2019

A technique that enables biologically active enzymes to survive the rigors of inkjet printing presents a promising alternative to routine blood screening exams faced by diabetic patients. The KAUST-led team used this approach to make disposable devices that can measure glucose concentrations in human saliva.
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Image: A tumor cell lights up with high FRET biosensor readout; Copyright: UC San Diego Health

Sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread

02/01/2019

The spread of invasive cancer cells from a tumor's original site to distant parts of the body is known as metastasis. It is the leading cause of death in people with cancer. In a paper published online in iScience, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers reported engineering sensors that can detect and measure the metastatic potential of single cancer cells.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Image of a human cell coloured in black, blue, purple and yellow; Copyright: Roberta Schulte/Swati Tyagi/Salk Institute

Machine learning may predict a healthy old age

02/01/2019

For a study published in Genome Biology, a team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells ranging from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. Developing a better understanding of the biological processes of aging could eventually help to address health conditions that are more common in old age, such as heart disease and dementia.
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Image: The researchers tracked the development of stem cells using so-called confetti reporters.; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Brain confetti - why our sense of smell declines in old age

20/12/2018

In mammals, generation of new neurons (neurogenesis) is mainly limited to early childhood and occurs in adulthood only in a few regions of the forebrain. One such exception is olfactory neurons, which develop from stem cells via several intermediate stages.
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Image: On the left, an expanded human cell with microtubules (blue) and a pair of centrioles (yellow-red) in the middle; Copyright: Fabian Zwettler / University of Würzburg

Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy

19/12/2018

Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures? That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably.
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Image: Sweating woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Andriy Popov

Wearable sweat sensor pioneer issued key device patent

19/12/2018

Eccrine Systems, Inc., an advanced sweat sensor company, today announced that a key patent, US10136831, has been issued to Dr. Jason Heikenfeld, Co-Founder & CSO, and prominent University of Cincinnati researcher. The company holds exclusive rights to the UC patent.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15/11/2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15/11/2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Interview with MedicalTek Co., Ltd.

15/11/2018

Many diagnostic and treatment questions can be answered with a glance inside the body. At the MedicalTek stand at MEDICA 2018, we learn how imaging systems in minimally invasive surgery can help physicians.
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Diagnosis in HD – Imaging at MEDICA 2018

14/11/2018

Whether CT, MRT, X-rays or ultrasound – imaging methods provide insights into the human body and are irreplaceable for diagnostics. They are part of everyday hospital life since a long time, but what is currently happening in this field? We took a look – at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05/10/2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01/10/2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01/10/2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01/10/2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Small, black, oval device with a sensor for fingerprints; Copyright: NuvoAir AB

Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24/09/2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
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Image: for better care: the electronic patient file; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hasloo

Electronic Health Record: Transparent Patient?

21/09/2018

A smart hospital has many components, which ultimately come together as a connected whole, thus achieving better patient care. One crucial piece of the puzzle that some countries like the U.S. have implemented but one that’s still missing in Germany is the electronic health record (or electronic medical record). It is shrouded in controversy and yet a critical aspect of the hospital of the future.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03/09/2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Older couple is sitting next to each other, using their smartphones; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Fabrice Michaudeau

Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01/08/2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01/08/2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: Computer generated model of a human body, consisting of a white grid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

Diagnosing diseases with big data

01/08/2018

All of us generate data every day without even realizing it – sometimes it happens unconsciously and unintentionally. At this point, we are made of data and not just in the eyes of tech companies but also from a healthcare system perspective. Our electronic health records are a smorgasbord of data for example.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Biomechanical measuring systems – motion and posture analysis in orthopedics

21/06/2018

Biomechanical measuring systems are used in orthopedics to diagnose and treat misalignments and diseases. The Velamed Company uses its high-tech solutions to measure biomechanical parameters that enable a holistic analysis of human movement and posture. We took a closer look at how this works.
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01/06/2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01/06/2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17/05/2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02/05/2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30/04/2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: A hand touches a smartphone camera that is measuring the heart rate with an app; Copyright: Preventicus GmbH

"Preventicus Heartbeats": An app that's a clinically validated medical device

01/12/2017

Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Yet many incidences of stroke are preventable since they are frequently associated with an undetected abnormal heart rhythm. In this case, patients can benefit from using the clinically validated "Preventicus Heartbeats" app, which measures and documents the heart rhythm with a smartphone camera.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22/11/2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Research and diagnostics – laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017

14/11/2017

Whether analysis, evaluation or preparation of samples – the laboratory is the core of every research institute. The work’s efficiency also depends to a large extent on the equipment and items. You can discover the latest trends and developments in laboratory technology at MEDICA 2017. See for yourself!
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Three proofs in one go - Interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG

13/11/2017

Measles, mumps and rubella are usually mentioned in connection with the well-known polyvalent vaccine. Now, a novel DNA test can be used to remedy an unclear situation about an infection. It is supposed to detect all three diseases in just one step. Find out more in our interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG at MEDICA 2017.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08/11/2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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Optical coherence tomography - Looking into the vessel with light

30/10/2017

The cardiology department at the Clinical Center Dortmund has used optical coherence tomography for many years. The technique can be used to examine the inside of the coronary arteries.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23/10/2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Point-of-care testing in the hospital – quality diagnostic results

18/10/2017

Point-of-care testing is an integral part of medicine. It enables simple, automated testing that yields fast results. Hospitals have also started to increasingly use POCT diagnostic systems over the past few years. We are guests at the Greifswald University Hospital where patient-side rapid diagnostic tests have already been successfully integrated into daily hospital operations.
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Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02/10/2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02/10/2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: Screen showing an image from cardiovascular angiography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fly_wish

Coronary heart disease: non-invasive imaging reduces catheter examinations

01/09/2017

Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause heart arrhythmia, heart insufficiency or heart attack. All the more important is an early, reliable diagnosis that helps to treat it and to reduce risk factors. But what is the best method for diagnosis? A recent study found that functional imaging methods can often spare patients the trouble and risks of a coronary angiography.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22/08/2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24/07/2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02/05/2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03/04/2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Image: Young man with curls with open mouth and hands over head. He is beset with tasks from all sides; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dima Sidelnikov

Healthy at work: "Occupational health management is a win-win situation"

22/03/2017

Exercising, keeping fit, staying healthy as you age – modern lifestyle goals pursued by many. Another buzzword related to this lifestyle is work-life balance. But how can you maintain this balance if your job makes it impossible to stay healthy? If stress and physical as well as emotional distress cripple employees? Finding a balance is often barely possible.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01/03/2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08/02/2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Image: Two people are sitting in a room, looking at a screen; Copyright: Rhön-Klinikum, ZTM Bad Kissingenrmedia.net/SimpleFoto

Project TeleView – Telemedicine for refugees

23/01/2017

Refugees who come to Germany struggle with language and cultural barriers – also when it comes to medical issues. Patients are often not able to state their medical history or acute conditions, which requires extra time and means increased costs for medical offices and shelters. The telemedicine project TeleView seeks to offer a solution to this problem.
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Image: A young girl is lying in the hospital bed, behind her a nurse is adjusting a monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Monkeybusiness Images

Working with children with cancer – More than just a job

02/01/2017

Our topic title "pediatric (children’s) oncology" evoked strong emotional reactions from several mothers and fathers of our staff. "This hits too close to home for me, I couldn’t write about it", or "How do people manage to deal with this?". And we are only on the sidelines; physicians, caregivers and nurses at the hospital, hospice or families at home are the ones that have the real tough job.
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