Articles -- MEDICA Trade Fair

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

Image: A volunteer receives an injection in the PREVAIL Ebola vaccine clinical trial; Copyright: PREVAIL

Experimental Ebola vaccines elicit year-long immune response

16/10/2017

Results from a large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Liberia show that two candidate Ebola vaccines pose no major safety concerns and can elicit immune responses by one month after initial vaccination that last for at least one year.
Read more
Image: tools for blood testing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gisne

Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answers

13/10/2017

How much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, as research at Sahlgrenska Academy shows.
Read more
Image: young woman sleeping; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pressmaster

New insights into how sleep helps the brain to reorganise itself

13/10/2017

A study has given new insights into how sleep contributes to brain plasticity – the ability for our brain to change and reorganise itself – and could pave the way for new ways to help people with learning and memory disorders.
Read more
Image: proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells; Copyright: Rice University/UTHEALTH

Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many forms

11/10/2017

Rice, UTHealth researchers use light-sensitive molecules to track proteins critical to cell signaling.
Read more
Image: woman holding a pink ribbon to her chest; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tomas_anderson

Genetic targets to chemo-resistant breast cancer identified

10/10/2017

Research led by Dr. Carlos Arteaga, Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, has identified potential targets for treatment of triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
Read more
Picture: two women perform exercises and are wired with electrodes; Copyright: University of Erlangen/Wolfgang Kemmler

Whole-body electromyostimulation training: fitness or prevention?

09/10/2017

Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) promises time-efficient muscle strength training that has positive effects after just a few sessions per week. Its objective is a fast increase in muscle mass and reduction of body fat. Can WB-EMS training replace conventional strength and endurance training? And can it help to prevent diseases or pain?
Read more
Image: microscope image of fluorescent cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vshivkova

New approaches in targeted cancer therapy

06/10/2017

In a large-scale testing procedure, scientists from Cologne University Hospital have explored the effects of more than 1,500 substances on different kinds of cancer cells. The results from this study are a fundamental prerequisite for the development of new therapies for NMC, an aggressive cancer which is often lethal.
Read more
Photo: A hand with the Gripfroce Box; Copyright: TU München

Determining motor deficits more precisely following a stroke

03/10/2017

After a stroke, many people are unable to successfully perform basic hand movements in everyday life. The reason are symptoms of hemiparesis resulting from damage to the brain. These very frequently affect fine motor skills. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is now paving the way to better diagnosis and more targeted therapy.
Read more
Image: image of a transparent human upper body with blue lungs; Copyright: panthermedia.net/iLexx

COPD action plan shortens duration of flare-ups and reduces hospital admissions

03/10/2017

The University of Twente carried out the first study worldwide that shows patients with COPD (lung disease caused by smoking) and other illnesses (heart disease, diabetes, anxiety and depression) have better outcomes if they follow a self-management programme with a customised action plan. Anke Lenferink of UT recently obtained a doctoral degree on this subject.
Read more
Image: Man who is blowing into a smartphone adapter for breath tests; Copyright: THM/Gross/Sohrabi

AST@home: A rapid respiratory test for COPD using the smartphone

02/10/2017

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often requires a detailed documentation of the course. As part of the AST@home project, Professor Keywan Sohrabi and Professor Volker Groß at the THM developed an app that enables the monitoring of the course of COPD via smartphone and includes family members or nursing staff.
Read more
Image: blood cells in a blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Eraxion

Fresh blood for damaged tissues via alginate hydrogels

29/09/2017

Biomaterial-mediated delivery of blood vessel growth factors could be used as a therapeutic strategy to treat peripheral vascular disease.
Read more
Image: transparent human head, showing the brain and firing synapses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/the_lightwriter

Researchers of TU Dresden have pioneered a brain-network bio-inspired algorithm to predict new therapeutic targets of approved drugs

29/09/2017

An international team of scientists led by Dr. Carlo Vittorio Cannistraci, Junior Group Leader of the Biomedical Cybernetics lab at the BIOTEChnology Center TU Dresden, has developed a powerful computational method that can exploit the principles of brain-network self-organization.
Read more
Image: shaking hands of an elderly woman holding a glass of water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid08

Researchers hopeful they can improve techniques for joint defect treatment

28/09/2017

Different surface topographies and materials provide interesting ways to study cell behaviour and potentially provide novel solutions for treating joint defects. Tissue engineering methods that simulate native cartilage could prove useful to create cartilage implants in the laboratory, according to a doctoral dissertation from Umeå University.
Read more
Image: shaking hands of an elderly woman holding a glass of water; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Astrid08

Diabetes medicine reduces Parkinson's risk

28/09/2017

A Norwegian study shows that the taking of diabetes medicine reduces the risk of getting Parkinson's disease.
Read more
Image: transparent human body with intestinal system highlighted in orange; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sciencepics

Promising modification of the intestinal flora in colon cancer

27/09/2017

Living lactic acid bacteria, probiotics, can change the intestinal flora of patients with cancer of the colon. These are the findings of a study published in the journal BMJ Open Gastroenterology.
Read more
Image: woman holding a hand to her throat, which is marked red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vonschonertagen

New treatment for chronic throat irritation and globus sensation in the gullet

26/09/2017

Chronic throat irritation, a permanent globus sensation, a sore or dry sensation in the throat are common symptoms, which are often trivialised and wrongly attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. However, these are also the characteristic symptoms of patients suffering from displaced gastric mucosa in the oesophagus (ectopic mucosa).
Read more
Image: Zebrafish β-cells labeled using the Beta-bow system; Copyright: Ninov lab

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

25/09/2017

Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden (PLID), and his group developed a system called "Beta-bow", which allows the history of β-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging.
Read more
Image: cross section through a healthy bone above cross section of a bone with osteoporosis ; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Roberto_Biasini

Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss

25/09/2017

This knowledge can provide targets in the search for novel bone-loss therapeutics to treat osteoporosis.
Read more
Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22/09/2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
Read more
Image: image of how Taxanes induce tripolar instead of normal bipolar cell division; Copyright: Munich University Hospital

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

21/09/2017

Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action – and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy.
Read more
Image: woman holding a hand to her chest; copyright: panthermedia.net/piotr_marcinski

Study on transplanted hearts reveals risk genes for cardiovascular diseases

15/09/2017

With participation of the Helmholtz Zentrum München, an international research team has discovered a number of new risk factors for dilated cardiomyopathy and other heart conditions. In the largest transcriptome study to date, the researchers analysed the RNA of transplanted hearts. The study was recently published in "Genome Biology".
Read more
Image: yellow warning sign with the word

Asthma drug from the garden center

15/09/2017

The coralberry could offer new hope for asthmatics: researchers at the University of Bonn have extracted a new kind of active pharmaceutical ingredient from its leaves to combat this widespread respiratory disease.
Read more
Image: liver with a warning sign on it; copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

How liver cancer develops

13/09/2017

Liver cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death and represents the fastest rising cancer worldwide. In most cases, the tumor develops in patients with chronic liver disease. Such diseases include chronic infections with hepatitis viruses or a so-called fatty liver due to nutritional or genetically caused lipometabolic disorders or an excessive consumption of alcohol.
Read more
Image: a human skeleton, several joints highlighted red; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eraxion

New osteoporosis treatment uses traditional Chinese herb to prevent bone loss

12/09/2017

An herb widely used in traditional Chinese medicine might hold the key to a new osteoporosis therapy that could prevent bone loss without causing side effects.
Read more
Image: female doctor talks with a man about his research results displayed on a computer screen; Copyright: panthermedia.net/imagepointfr

Recurrence of prostate cancer could be reduced thanks to exciting new discovery

06/09/2017

Ground breaking research could reduce the recurrence of prostate cancer in males, a new study in the journal Nature Communications reports.
Read more
Image: transparent brain with a tumor, highlighted in orange; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sebastian Kaulitzki

Researchers map brain tumour cells’ adaptation to oxygen deprivation

18/08/2017

The most aggressive variant of brain tumour – glioblastoma – has an average survival rate of 15 months. There is therefore an urgent need for new treatment strategies for this group of patients. A research team from Lund University in Sweden has now identified new factors which may affect the tumour cells’ ability to resist treatment.
Read more
Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01/08/2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
Read more
Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
Read more
Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10/07/2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
Read more
Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08/02/2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
Read more
Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01/02/2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
Read more
Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
Read more
Image: Drawing of a human body, written down are risks for diabetics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/marigranula

Heart attacks in diabetics – a special danger

01/12/2016

Diabetics are not only schooled in getting a handle on their blood glucose levels, but also in looking out for possible complications. One complication of diabetes is nerve damage. It is often responsible for the so-called "diabetic foot". Something many people are not aware of is that the heart can also be put at risk by nerve damage.
Read more
Image: Hand of a person in the hospital bed, next to the call button; Copyright: panthermedia.net/bignai

Being safe: electronic call systems for hospitals

02/11/2016

Call systems: every hospital patient is familiar with them, but hardly anyone gives any thought to how they work. And yet they fulfill an important function because in an emergency, they "call" for help. Just think what might happen if they didn’t work. That is why they are subject to stringent safety regulations. We spoke with D.Eng. Matthias Rychetsky, who is familiar with call systems.
Read more
Image: In the middle of a computer window is written in big white letters Diabetes. A hand is tapping onto the word; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pichet Wissawapipat

Telediabetology: Telemedicine to fight diabetes

02/11/2016

World Diabetes Day is on November 14 of this year. This is reason enough to get informed about the options available in medicine on the subject of "diabetes". One area is telediabetology, a combination of telemedicine and diabetology. It is still not widespread in Germany, but that is about to change because the benefits for patients, physicians and hospitals are obvious.
Read more
Image: Woman lying along on a couch. Her right leg is moved by a man standing next to her; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia

Preoperative rehabilitation: Fit for surgery

24/10/2016

Preoperative rehabilitation is gaining importance in medicine. It helps to prepare patients for upcoming treatments and surgeries, thereby reducing risks and complications during surgery and making faster rehabilitation possible.
Read more
Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
Read more
Image: Graphic of a head within a computer network - many lines and bright colors; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Ostrovsky

My Avatar and Me – the digitization of healthcare records

04/10/2016

So far, avatars could only be found in computer games. But if researchers of the EU-wide www.myhealthavatar.eu project have their way, this could soon change.
Read more
Image: Different medical symbols are seen like on a screen. A hand wearing a white glove taps on a symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Networked healthcare – Apps and co.

04/10/2016

Digitization is on the rise and doesn't even stop with medicine. A video doctor consultation, a fitness app or a collection of data for a better cancer treatment: eHealth combines the possibilities of the internet with the demands of medicine and opens up entirely new possibilities for the medical industry.
Read more
Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?

01/09/2016

Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
Read more
Image: Closed eyes of a patient. Electrodes are attached above the eyebrows; Copyright: savir-center.com

Electrical Stimulation: Using Electrical Pulses to Combat Blindness

22/07/2016

Millions of people all over the world suffer from partial blindness – caused by glaucoma, a stroke or traumatic brain injury. For years, the loss of vision was deemed irreversible. But now a new treatment makes it possible to improve eyesight and vision.
Read more
Photo: Men and women running

Individualized sports medicine: training by design

22/06/2016

Exercise makes you healthy – oftentimes even when you are sick. That’s why doctors hardly ever recommend taking a break from it. Even patients who are about to receive a heart transplant can benefit from sports. As is so often the case, the dose makes the poison. We asked sports medicine physician Prof. Martin Halle, what people need to consider.
Read more
Photo: Doctor at laptop

New E-Health Act: "Patients have control over their data"

08/05/2016

The "Act on secure digital communication and applications in the health care system" (the e-Health Act in short) took effect on December 29 last year. By the end of 2018, hospitals and medical practices will be gradually introduced to the new features of the electronic health card and telemedicine.
Read more
Photo: Pregnancy test

Disaster medicine or disastrous medicine?

04/01/2016

Most Europeans think it was a long time ago, but the residents of West Africa clearly feel the consequences of the Ebola epidemic that broke out in December 2013 and still continues today. So far, approximately 11,300 people have died as a result of the outbreak; more than 28,000 contracted the disease.
Read more
Graphic: stent in a blood vessel

Mechanical thrombectomy: stroke treatment 2.0

01/12/2015

Each year, approximately 250,000 Germans suffer a stroke. This makes stroke the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. The circulatory disorder that occurs in the brain is normally treated using systemic thrombolysis, a procedure that bears various risks. Unlike mechanical thrombectomy, which offers clear advantages by comparison.
Read more

From the periodic table of elements into medicine: silicon for theranostics

01/10/2015

Semiconductor nanoparticles for biomedical applications have been researched for some time now. Not only are they millionths of a millimeter in size, they also offer great potential for cancer diagnostics and therapy, so-called theranostics. They enter cells, are activated by ultrasonic radiation and destroy the cells using the generated vibration.
Read more

Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine

01/10/2015

It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
Read more

Fighting myomas with ultrasound

01/10/2015

A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
Read more