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MED TECH & DEVICES

Reports, interviews, news and videos about imaging and diagnostics / medical equipment and devices.
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DIGITAL HEALTH

Reports, interviews, news and videos about IT systems and IT solutions.
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LAB & DIAGNOSTICS

Reports, interviews, news and videos about laboratory equipment and diagnostics.
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PHYSIO TECH

Reports, interviews, news and videos about physiotherapy and orthopaedic technology.
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DISPOSABLES

Reports, interviews, news and videos about disposables.
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AI-driven tool to personalize 3D-printable models
MIT researchers developed a generative-AI-driven tool that enables the user to add custom design elements to 3D models without compromising the functionality of the fabricated objects. A designer could utilize this tool, called Style2Fab, to personalize 3D models of objects using only natural language prompts to describe their desired design.
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Premature infants: early detection of vascular disease
Dr. Anne Hilgendorff’s team from Helmholtz Munich and the LMU University Hospital developed a non-invasive method with no need for sedation using MR imaging to detect early signs of vascular disease associated with chronic pulmonary impairment in premature infants, offering new avenues for risk stratification and potential prevention of complications later in life.
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Targeted ultrasound can change brain functions for up to an hour
A study published in Nature Communications suggests transcranial ultrasound stimulation can be used in a targeted way to change specific types of activity within the brain for up to an hour after intervention.
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AI-powered triage platform could aid future viral outbreak response
A team of researchers from Yale University and other institutions globally has developed an innovative patient triage platform powered by artificial intelligence (AI) that the researchers say is capable of predicting patient disease severity and length of hospitalization during a viral outbreak.
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Modifiable risk factors responsible for half of cardiovascular diseases
Scientists of the Global Cardiovascular Risk Consortium have proven that the five classic cardiovascular risk factors overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes mellitus are directly connected to more than half of all cardiovascular diseases worldwide.
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Electrotherapy without surgery is possible
Researchers at Lund University and Gothenburg University have successfully developed temporary, organic electrodes that can be seamlessly integrated into biological systems.
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Nature-inspired pressure sensing technology aims to transform healthcare and surgical robots
NUS researchers have developed 'eAir', an innovative pressure sensor inspired by the lotus leaf effect. This sensor could revolutionize minimally invasive surgeries by providing tactile feedback to surgeons and improve patient experiences in monitoring intracranial pressure. Its unique design enhances precision and reliability, potentially transforming various medical applications.
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The anatomy of memory: new mnemomic networks discovered in the brain
Using a novel approach of precision neuroimaging and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), neuroscientists and physicists at MPI CBS in Leipzig (Germany) and anatomist Menno Witter from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim (Norway) have now ventured into the depths of the human memory system.
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Study: Fluidity predicts aggressiveness of cancerous tumours
Researchers discovered that the consistency of a tumor can have a decisive influence on the further course of cancer.
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AI could shorten the diagnostic journey of millions suffering from endometriosis
The quality of life of millions suffering from endometriosis – a painful disease where sensitive tissue grows outside of the uterus – could be improved by a new artificial intelligence (AI) system with technology developed by the University of Adelaide in South Australia, in partnership with researchers from the University of Surrey.
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REM sleep study: new ways of early Parkinson's therapy
Disturbed dream sleep may indicate later Parkinson's disease. Researchers at MHH Neurology are now investigating the preliminary phase of the neurodegenerative disease and are offering places for study participants.
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Children with ADHD: non-invasive brain stimulation can ease symptoms
Non-invasive brain stimulation, combined with cognitive training, could significantly improve symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to new research jointly led by the University of Surrey and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
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Using machine learning to make ventilator support safer for children
Robinder Khemani, MD, MsCI, Attending Physician in Pediatric Intensive Care at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, is using machine learning to improve the outcomes of children put on ventilators.
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New imaging technology for a quick look inside a human being
Physicists at the University of Würzburg have succeeded in making a new imaging technique ready for use on humans. Radioactive markers and radiation are not necessary for this.
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Neurology: researchers identify changes in ageing brain using novel techniques
Researchers investigating brain activity in older people say the coordination between neuronal activity and the brain’s oxygenation is altered.
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FAU: research project about robotic assistance systems receives funding
In the “ForNeRo – Seamless and Ergonomic Integration of Robotics into the Clinical Workflow” research network, researchers from FAU and five other research institutions and five companies are developing methods for integrating robotic assistance systems for surgical applications using intuitive interfaces in the operating room.
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Cardiac disease: new technique shows cause of sleep disturbance
In a paper published in the journal Science, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows that heart diseases affect the production of the sleep hormone melatonin in the pineal gland.
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Improvement of the CT: earlier detection of breast cancer
A team of researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich, together with the Baden Cantonal Hospital (KSB) and the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), has succeeded in refining mammography, x-ray imaging technique used to detect tumours in their early stages, to produce considerably more reliable results and be less unpleasant for the patient.
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Electrodes: 4D printing for nerve stimulation
Specific nerves may be stimulated artificially, for example to treat pain. The finer the nerves, the more difficult it is to attach the required electrodes. Researchers have now developed flexible electrodes produced with 4D printing technology. On contact with moisture, they automatically fold and wrap themselves around thin nerves.
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Breast cancer: international expert recommendations on removal of lymph nodes
Researchers from Heidelberg University Hospital and the University of Lucerne as well as international scientists, patient representatives and European cancer societies have pooled scientific data and their expert knowledge on the surgical management of lymph nodes in breast cancer.
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Brain: a varied life boosts functional networks
The findings in mice provide unprecedented insights into the complexity of large-scale neural networks and brain plasticity. Moreover, they could pave the way for new brain-inspired artificial intelligence methods.
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Brain stimulation: using electricity to treat depression
The Center for Responsible Research and Innovation (CeRRi) within the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO, working with the University of Ottawa in Canada, the National Paraplegic Hospital in Toledo, Spain and the University Medical Center Göttingen in Germany, has developed recommended actions for implementing technological solutions to treat mental illnesses.
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Brain: LIONESS enables insights into complex tissue
In a new paper, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) has come together to present a new way to observe the brain’s structure and dynamics – in a high resolution and without damaging the tissue.
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Multiple sclerosis: new biomarker for early diagnosis
A study conducted by researchers from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and University Hospital Vienna has demonstrated for the first time that diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be significantly improved by additionally measuring the thickness of retinal layers in the eye.
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Coronary heart disease: recommendations for imaging diagnostics
An interdisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists has published a consensus paper recommending appropriate quantitative imaging techniques for coronary artery stenosis and atherosclerosis related treatment and procedural planning.
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Breast cancer: more cases detected with the help of AI
One radiologist supported by AI detected more cases of breast cancer in screening mammography than two radiologists working together, reports the ScreenTrustCAD study from Karolinska Institutet in The Lancet Digital Health.
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MHH and simpleclub strengthen digital MFA training
To make medical assistants (MFA) fit for the future, Hannover Medical School (MHH) is launching a digital training offensive: together with the learning platform simpleclub, it is digitizing this professional training.
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Future-proof security architecture for healthcare communications
Germany’s telematics infrastructure (TI) aims to allow healthcare professionals to exchange patient data securely, rapidly and from anywhere. The platform for healthcare applications will soon see a new security architecture. The aim is to make it easier to exchange data between all parties involved as well as to facilitate access to specialist services.
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New concussion headset shows when it's safe to return to play
A new digital headset designed to measure alterations in brain function could change decisions about how quickly an athlete is ready to return to play after a concussion.
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AI-supported mammography screening is found to be safe
Mammography screening supported by artificial intelligence (AI) is a safe alternative to today’s conventional double reading by radiologists and can reduce heavy workloads for doctors.
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AI will soon be able to write doctor’s letters
Around 150 million doctor’s letters are written every year in Germany. This takes precious time which could be used elsewhere. The “doctor’s letter generator”, which is currently being developed by scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems IAIS, could provide a solution for creating the document in a fraction of the time.
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Machine learning: artificial neural networks localize extrasystoles
Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use machine learning for the non-invasive localization of ventricular extrasystoles. This may facilitate and improve future diagnosis and therapy.
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Epileptika: app to help treatment of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability
A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) has participated in the development of Epileptika. This application aims to help the treatment of refractory epilepsy in people with intellectual disability.
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Skin cancer diagnosis: reinforcement learning for improved performance of AI
An international research team led by Harald Kittler of MedUni Vienna has now explored a learning method in which greater accuracy in AI results can be achieved by incorporating human decision-making criteria.
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AI and precision medicine may discover risk of cardiovascular disease
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, among others, have now found that artificial intelligence seems to play a role in identifying the risk of cardiovascular disease.
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AI-based tracking and early-warning system for viral pandemics
Scripps Research scientists have developed a machine-learning system—a type of artificial intelligence (AI) application—that can track the detailed evolution of epidemic viruses and predict the emergence of viral variants with important new properties.
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App helps with early detection of eye diseases causing blindness
Two students on the Master's Degree in Bioinformatics and Biostatistics at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) have developed a mobile app capable of detecting in a matter of seconds whether someone is suffering from glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy or cataracts, three of the world's most common causes of vision loss and blindness.
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AI brings hope for children with lyosomal storage disease
Artificial intelligence is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery. Advances in the use of Big Data, learning algorithms and powerful computers have now enabled researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) to better understand a serious metabolic disease.
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Virtual reality: healthy aging with virtual aids
Can elderly people really learn how to use new technologies and adapt themselves in learning new tools? The answer, according to researcher Dr. Amir Jahanian Najafabadi and colleagues at Constructor University in Bremen, is yes.
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AI classifies cardiac functions, heart disease
Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have unveiled an innovative use of AI that classifies cardiac functions and pinpoints valvular heart disease with unprecedented accuracy, demonstrating continued progress in merging the fields of medicine and technology to advance patient care.
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AI against bowel cancer: research project DECADE
The DECADE research project is the first to use swarm learning in cancer research. The German Cancer Aid is funding the joint project of several university hospitals with around 1.5 million euros.
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Digital patient model: decision support for physicians and cost-saver
New perspectives for the healthcare sector: The support system for decision-making developed as part of the MED²ICIN project should increase the treatment success rate. It supports physicians in their decision-making process by pooling all of the information on an individual patient and comparing this to that of cohorts made up of similar individuals.
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Digitization, AI, robotics: how healthcare will change over the next 50 years
A study by researchers at Mälardalen University (MDU) describes what our future healthcare industry may look like.
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Chatbots like ChatGPT: approval as medical devices
The new Nature Medicine paper by Prof. Stephen Gilbert, et. al. addresses one of the most pressing international issues of our time: How to regulate Large Language Models (LLMs) in general and specifically in health.
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Pregnancy: intelligent patch for remote monitoring
A patch equipped with highly sensitive electronics is meant to collect and evaluate vital data. In addition, the sensors will be integrated into baby clothing in order to improve the future of medical monitoring for newborns with the highest level of data security.
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Atrial fibrillation: supermarket trolleys set to help diagnosis
It could be the shopping trip that saves your life: supermarket trolleys are helping to diagnose atrial fibrillation which can then be treated to prevent disabling or fatal strokes.
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AI enables first integrated single-cell atlas of the lung
Can a human organ be mapped on a single-cell level to learn more about each individual cell? And can we learn how different these cells are from person to person? Helmholtz Munich researchers and their collaborators have taken up this challenge and developed the Human Lung Cell Atlas using artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques.
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AI in eye scans: improved diagnosis of inherited disease of the retina
Researchers from the UK and Germany have used artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a system that they believe will enable more widespread provision of testing, together with improved efficiency.
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AI from the universities in Kiel and San Francisco launched
A delegation from the CAU and UKSH joined Schleswig-Holstein's Minister President Daniel Günther in opening the new infrastructure for AI in the USA in the night of 8 June 2023 (German time).
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Infectious diseases: digital 'vaccine library' against pandemics
The Institute for Drug Discovery led by Humboldt Professor Jens Meiler is to receive 1.9 million dollars (1.77 million euros) for the development of vaccines. The international Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) will fund computer-aided vaccine development at Leipzig University with the aim of building a digital ‘vaccine library’ of components and virtual antigen designs.
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Autism: brain organoid shows genetic bases
Technology, developed by researchers from the Knoblich group at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Treutlein group at ETH Zurich, permits the identification of vulnerable cell types and gene regulatory networks that underlie autism spectrum disorders.
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New blood marker can identify parkinsonian diseases
Is it possible that a single biomarker can detect all types of diseases related to dopamine deficiency in the brain? Yes, that's what a research group in Lund is discovering.
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Pathogen detection through electronic detection of DNA nanoballs
Researchers at Karolinska Institute have developed a novel method using DNA Nanoballs to detect pathogens, aiming to simplify nucleic acid testing and revolutionize pathogen detection.
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Microrobots: opportunities for cancer treatment and wound healing
A group of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed the world’s first microrobot (“microbot”) capable of navigating within groups of cells and stimulating individual cells.
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Microchips: better understand diseases like schizophrenia
The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the recipients of its prestigious Starting Grants. Among them is a researcher from the Technical University of Braunschweig: Dr. Thomas Winkler will receive €1.5 million for his research on modular organ-on-chip technology to better understand neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.
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How immune cells migrate
When fighting disease, our immune cells need to reach their target quickly. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) now discovered that immune cells actively generate their own guidance system to navigate through complex environments.
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Predicting severe liver disease with simple tools
A European consortium with the participation of the MHH is developing a new tool to determine the individual risk of liver fibrosis and liver cancer.
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New blood test gives very high accuracy to screen for Alzheimer’s disease
A new blood test called p-tau217 shows promise as an Alzheimer's disease biomarker, and when used in a two-step workflow very high accuracy to either identify or exclude brain amyloidosis, the most important and earliest pathology.
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Advanced biosensors to detect tumors, viruses and bacterial diseases
Linnaeus University is partnering with industry and healthcare to develop advanced biosensors, investing SEK 35 million in a project aimed at faster and cost-effective diagnoses of aggressive lung cancer, viral, and bacterial diseases, potentially enabling self-testing at home.
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Protection for cancer patients
Tübingen T-cell activator offers protection against coronaviruses in immunocompromised patients
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More impact against cancer
MHH molecular physician Professor Dr. Dr. Schambach wants to use genetically modified natural killer cells to find new therapeutic options against three particularly malignant cancers. The EU is funding the project with 3.8 million euros
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When the heart loses its nerves
How do nerves and blood vessels interact in the aging heart? Recent research results from the Institute of Cardiovascular Regeneration and the Cardio-Pulmonary Institute at Goethe University Frankfurt shed new light on aging processes in the heart.
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Innovative computational approach helps design proteins for cancer treatment
A joint team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen and the University Hospital Tübingen has now developed and tested a new computational method to greatly speed up the necessary energy calculations.
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Timing is key in cortisone treatment of inflammation
A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
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Pharmacy: Using starch as a novel drug transporter?
A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
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Researchers decode new antibiotic
Cooperation between the University of Bonn, the USA and the Netherlands cracks the mode of action of clovibactin
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Immunotherapy: Antibody kit to fight tumors
A new study highlights the potential of artificial DNA structures that, when fitted with antibodies, instruct the immune system to specifically target cancerous cells.
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Research gives new insights into fighting antimicrobial resistance
Cooking food thoroughly and avoiding some types of vegetables and salad during a course of antibiotic treatment could potentially reduce antibiotic resistance, by preventing bacteria carrying resistance genes getting into the gut, according to a new study.
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How harmless turns dangerous
MHH researcher Prof. Galardini from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence finds causes for bloodstream infections in the genes of bacteria. This will enable better diagnostics and vaccinations in the future.
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Building muscle in the lab
A new method allows large quantities of muscle stem cells to be safely obtained in cell culture.
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Programmable DNA hydrogels for advanced cell culture and personalized medicine
The team of Dr. Elisha Krieg at the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden has developed a dynamic DNA-crosslinked matrix (DyNAtrix) by combining classical synthetic polymers with programmable DNA crosslinkers.
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Riding a wave to better medical diagnosis
New UBC Okanagan research takes aim at improving diagnostic imaging
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A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull
Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
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AI shows how Aspergillus fumigatus gets comfortable in the lungs
Aspergillus fumigatus strains that infect humans have a significantly altered metabolism compared to other strains in the environment. At the same time, infection with the fungus leads to an apparent change in the human lung microbiome.
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Cancer photoimmunotherapy: novel liquid metal nanoparticles
JAIST researchers create liquid metal nanoparticles (PEG-IMIQ-LM) for cancer treatment, merging photothermal therapy and immunotherapy. Disintegration delivers immunomodulants and tracks cancer cells in real-time. Immune checkpoint inhibitor enhances cancer removal. Promising for future cancer theranostics, with clinical trials anticipated in a decade.
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AI-based system will help people after stroke
The joint study by Rytis Maskeliūnas, a researcher at Kaunas University of Technology, Faculty of Informatics (KTU IF), and Lithuanian researchers is focused on creating an artificial intelligence (AI)-based system that aims to facilitate the rehabilitation process.
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Bionic hand: surgical and engineering innovations enable unprecedented control
For the first time, a person with an arm amputation can manipulate each finger of a bionic hand as if it was his own. Thanks to revolutionary surgical and engineering advancements that seamlessly merge humans with machines, this breakthrough offers new hope and possibilities for people with amputations worldwide.
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AI supports rehabilitation after spinal cord injury
An intelligent suit is hoped to significantly improve rehabilitation after a serious spinal cord injury. The AI-supported solution will be developed over the next three years by researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) working in collaboration with Heidelberg University and Heidelberg University Hospital.
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Ankle exosuit: more independence for post-stroke wearers
Designed for independent use in community settings, the new exosuit could help stroke survivors improve their gait outside of the lab and during their daily routines.
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Weekly magnetic muscle therapy improves mobility and lean body mass in older adults
A decline in functional mobility, loss of muscle strength and an increase in body fats are often associated with ageing. This trend could potentially be reversed by way of an innovative magnetic muscle therapy pioneered by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS).
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Low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses
A low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses: The ARM2u biomedical engineering team, from the UPC’s Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB), is working on new functions for their low-cost 3D-printed transradial prosthesis.
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Physical activity crucial for poststroke recovery
After a stroke, physical activity can be pivotal to successful recovery. People who spend four hours a week exercising after their stroke achieve better functional recovery within six months than those who do not, a University of Gothenburg study shows.
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Kick-off: new Marie Skłodowska-Curie Doctoral Network "ReWIRE"
Through ReWIRE, next-generation scientists will be trained to develop translational breakthrough therapeutic solutions for patients with paralysis caused by traumatic spinal cord injuries.
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3D-printed insoles measure sole pressure directly in the shoe
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and EPFL are developing a 3D-printed insole with integrated sensors that allows the pressure of the sole to be measured in the shoe and thus during any activity.
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Poor balance may indicate changes in brain volume
In a study recently published in Gait & Posture, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that the volume of the hippocampus is correlated with a measure of balance ability in healthy older people.
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Balance ability predicts cognitive impairment
In a study recently published in BMC Geriatrics, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed a new measure of physical balance that could help to identify individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD).
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Mechanical stimulation could be used to prevent falls and strengthen muscles
Mechanical vibrations could help improve our muscles and our balance control, according to research at Aston University. Researchers in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences have examined the effect of stimulation on muscle spindles which ‘speak’ to the central nervous system to help keep us upright and walk straight.
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Affordable device for fixing broken bones piloted in Gaza, Sri Lanka and Ukraine
Imperial researchers have developed a low-cost, easy-to-manufacture stabiliser for broken bones to help in regions where such devices are expensive or in short supply and people sometimes resort to homemade options.
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Total knee arthroplasty: Faster knee for better walking
Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have revealed that knee extension velocity while seated is a stronger predictor of walking performance than muscle strength in elderly patients after their total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery.
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A prosthetic limb that can read my mind
A team at FAU is investigating how intelligent prostheses can be improved. The idea is that interactive artificial intelligence will help the prostheses to recognize human intent better, to register their surroundings and to continue to develop and improve over time.
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Treatment for back pain: 84 percent increase in success rate
Multimodal therapies should be promoted on a larger scale in the German healthcare system, in line with the National Disease Management Guidelines.
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Rehab device enables stroke patients with arm disabilities to do more physical training
The GribAble device, created by researchers at Imperial College London and clinicians at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, consists of a lightweight electronic handgrip that interacts wirelessly with a standard PC tablet to enable the user to play arm-training games.
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High-dose gait training with robotic exoskeleton after acute stroke
Preliminary findings by Kessler researchers show that the use of a robotic exoskeleton during inpatient rehabilitation for acute stroke may improve function. Gait training in the robotic exoskeleton can provide high-dose therapy soon after stroke, when it is likely to have its maximal effect on functional ambulation.
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Biomaterials: toolbox for the development of bioadhesives
The team of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel, Chair of Biomaterials at the University of Bayreuth, has compiled a current overview of the state of research on protein-based bioadhesives.
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Jasmina Gačanin investigates living biomaterials
Dr. Jasmina Gačanin, postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in the department of Prof. Dr. Tanja Weil, has been appointed as a “Peretti-Schmucker Fellow”.
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Adsorber in blood purification: widely used, no proven benefit
Many hospitals use the adsorber CytoSorb to purify the blood of seriously ill patients in order to trap inflammatory substances and prevent the life-threatening cytokine storm. MHH researchers have now found in a meta-study that the treatment does not reduce mortality and may even cause harm.
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NOVA project: next generation of antimicrobial coating technologies
Researchers develop and test highly efficient, environmentally friendly and stable antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) coating technologies in the NOVA project.
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Sensor patch for abdominal surgery
Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a plaster with a sensor function to ensure that wounds in the abdomen remain tightly closed after an operation.
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Tissue Engineering: TU Graz revolutionises production of biocompatible microfibres
Using a newly developed method for the efficient and cost-effective production of biocompatible microfibres, the production of autologous skin and organs can be significantly accelerated. Responsible for the development are Carole Planchette and her team from TU Graz.
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Hygiene: monkeypox viruses relatively stable on surfaces
A study conducted by the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has shown that temperature is a major factor in this process: at room temperature, a monkeypox virus that is capable of replicating can survive on a stainless steel surface for up to eleven days, and at four degrees Celsius for up to a month.
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Regenerative medicine: cell-specific properties of novel spider silk materials
Materials made of spider silk can be specifically modified or processed in such a way that living cells of a certain type adhere to them, grow and proliferate. This has been discovered by researchers at the University of Bayreuth under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel.
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Wound dressing reveals infection
A nanocellulose wound dressing that can reveal early signs of infection without interfering with the healing process has been developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
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‘Smart’ bandages monitor wounds and provide targeted treatment
Most of the time, when someone gets a cut, scrape, burn, or other wound, the body takes care of itself and heals on its own. But this is not always the case. Diabetes can interfere with the healing process and create wounds that will not go away and that could become infected and fester.
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Incubators: method to reduce alcohol absorbed from disinfectants used
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba showed the association between the concentration of evaporated alcohol from alcohol-based disinfectants used for incubators and the amount of alcohol absorbed by premature infants.
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Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders
The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
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New ultrafast water disinfection method is more environmentally friendly
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have found a way to use small shocks of electricity to disinfect water, reducing energy consumption, cost, and environmental impact.
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Mucus-based gel improves bone graft results, promotes healing
Molecules from mucus can be used to produce synthetic bone graft material and help with the healing of larger bone loss, a new study found.
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Bioresorbable membrane for healing internal and external wounds
Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in using the bioresorbable silica gel Renacer to produce an electrospun membrane that is neither cytotoxic to cells nor genotoxic.
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Treating cornea ulcers with diagnostic light instead of corneal transplantation
Recently, a Korean joint research team from POSTECH-KKU has developed a new tissue adhesive that restores the damaged cornea by simply filling it and exposing it to light.
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Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials
A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Wound care: New spray fights infections and antibiotic resistance
A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden are presenting a new spray that can kill even antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and that can be used for wound care and directly on implants and other medical devices.
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Contact lenses to treat dry eye syndrome
A collaborative team from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) has developed a contact lens prototype that is specifically designed to prevent contact lens-induced dry eye (CLIDE).
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Radon: Face masks reduce radiation exposure
Researchers from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung now have proven in a paper published in the “International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health” that face masks - both FFP2 and surgical masks - strongly reduce lung exposure and thus the dose.
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Watching viruses fail
Using a new analytical method, Empa researchers have tracked viruses as they pass through face masks and compared their failure on the filter layers of different types of masks.
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Biomaterial capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections
Researchers from the Bioengineering and Biomaterials Laboratory of Universidad Católica de Valencia (UCV) have developed a new porous material capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections at the same time.
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ProQuIV optimizes the production of nonwoven masks
Producing infection control clothing requires a lot of energy and uses lots of material resources. Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a technology which helps to save materials and energy when producing nonwovens.
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Scientists develop gel made from spider silk proteins for biomedical applications
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have discovered that spider silk proteins can be fused to biologically active proteins and be converted into a gel at body temperature.
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Researchers release masks that instantaneously deactivate SARS-CoV-2
Researchers released a new type IIR surgical mask with an intelligent fabric that can instantaneously deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19.
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