MEDICA | Trade Fair for Medical Technology & Healthcare - Düsseldorf / Germany
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The five spheres of MEDICA!

Medical technology practised on dummies

MED TECH & DEVICES

Reports, interviews, news and videos about imaging and diagnostics / medical equipment and devices.
Experience the sphere "MED TECH & DEVICES"
Software image: IT systems / IT solutions for the healthcare sector

DIGITAL HEALTH

Reports, interviews, news and videos about IT systems and IT solutions.
Experience the sphere "DIGITAL HEALTH"
Laboratory equipment and diagnostics for medical technology

LAB & DIAGNOSTICS

Reports, interviews, news and videos about laboratory equipment and diagnostics.
Experience the sphere "LAB & DIAGNOSTICS"
Hip and wrist support in the healthcare sector

PHYSIO TECH

Reports, interviews, news and videos about physiotherapy and orthopaedic technology.
Experience the sphere "PHYSIO TECH"
Colourful bandages at the medical technology trade fair

DISPOSABLES

Reports, interviews, news and videos about disposables.
Experience the sphere "DISPOSABLES"
Bone fracture healing through smart implants with micro-massage
Saarland University presents a breakthrough in medical technology: smart implants that not only stabilize bone fractures, but also actively promote the healing process.
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Ultrasound sticker for monitoring post-surgical recovery
Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed an ultrasound sticker, offering a new way for clinicians to monitor patients' organ health and deep tissue post-surgery.
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Harnessing AI for medical imaging of lymphatic cancer cases
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology unveil an AI model capable of detecting lymphatic cancer with 90 percent accuracy, improving medical imaging analysis. This new technology promises to enhance diagnostic capabilities and streamline patient care.
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Advancing surgical precision: ROSA shoulder system
Zimmer Biomet, a leading medical technology company, has achieved a significant milestone with the FDA clearance of its ROSA Shoulder System for robotic-assisted shoulder replacement surgery. This innovation marks the world's first robotic surgery system specifically designed for shoulder replacement procedures.
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Imaging device for early gastrointestinal cancer detection
Gastrointestinal cancers (GCs) pose a significant health challenge worldwide, with early detection being crucial for effective treatment and improved survival rates. To address this need, scientists have developed a new imaging device aimed at enhancing the accuracy and accessibility of GC screening programs.
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Better diagnostics for enhanced hearing with cochlear implants
A research team from Hannover Medical School (MHH) and the University of Oldenburg is delving into the intricate processes of how the human brain adapts to electrical hearing through cochlear implants (CIs). The study, part of the Hearing4all Cluster of Excellence, aims to shed light on the diverse mechanisms influencing speech comprehension among CI users.
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Optimizing humanitarian logistics enhancing medical supply distribution
Amid global conflicts, accessing medical supplies is vital. The ICRC, dedicated to aiding millions affected, grapples with complex distribution challenges. Teaming up with ETH Zurich, they've devised new logistics solutions for efficient and timely supply delivery to crisis zones.
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Portable device to improve post-stroke arm recovery
A new stroke treatment using a portable, pacemaker-like device that delivers electrical pulses to the brain during rehabilitation therapy is set to undergo trials to enhance arm recovery following a stroke.
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Early breast cancer detection with AI-powered tool
In a new development, NTU Singapore researchers have introduced PINN, a state-of-the-art computer program that utilizes AI and heat-imaging technology to detect early breast cancer swiftly and accurately.
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University of Birmingham develops diagnostic for traumatic brain injury
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have unveiled an innovative diagnostic device for the rapid detection of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This groundbreaking technology employs a safe laser directed into the eye, offering a distinct approach to diagnosing TBI.
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Contact lenses for early glaucoma detection
Glaucoma affects approximately 70 million people worldwide and poses a significant threat to vision, often leading to irreversible vision loss if left untreated. Nearly half of those afflicted with this condition remain unaware of its presence. Typically progressing gradually, glaucoma often escapes early detection, making it crucial to develop new tools for its timely diagnosis and treatment.
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Advancing reproductive medicine: Funding opportunities
Jena University Hospital and Friedrich Schiller University Jena proudly announce the establishment of the Jena Center for Early Pregnancy and Reproductive Health (CEPRE), a dynamic interdisciplinary initiative aimed at fostering innovative research in women's reproductive health and early pregnancy.
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Enhancing neonatal intensive care with ArtPlac project
The European Union is providing €3.57 million in funding for the "ArtPlac" research project, aimed at developing innovative medical technology for the treatment of premature and newborn infants in neonatal intensive care.
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Stroke: Progress in the treatment with state-of-the-art magnification technology
A new, extremely powerful angiography system from Canon was put into operation at the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology at Hannover Medical School (MHH).
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Miniature marvels: wireless millirobots successfully navigate arteries
For the first time ever, wireless millirobots navigated a narrow blood vessel both along and against arterial flow. Researchers from the University of Twente and Radboudumc inserted the screw-shaped robots in a detached aorta with kidneys where they controlled them using a robotically controlled rotating magnet.
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Advanced MRI technology detects changes in the brain after COVID-19
Researchers at Linköping University have examined the brains of 16 patients previously hospitalised for COVID-19 with persisting symptoms. They have found differences in brain tissue structure between patients with persisting symptoms after COVID-19 and healthy people.
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Singapore: advancing 3D printing in healthcare with joint R&D lab
Singapore General Hospital (SGH) patients are expected to benefit from healthcare innovations, such as customised medical devices and implants, under a collaboration with Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) to set up a Joint Research & Development Laboratory in additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing.
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Eye scans provide crucial insights into kidney health
3D eye scans can reveal vital clues about kidney health that could help to track the progression of disease, research suggests. The advance could revolutionise monitoring of kidney disease, which often progresses without symptoms in the early stages.
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Inspired by mussels: printable adhesives for tissues and bones
Titanium hip implants do not last forever — they gradually loosen, sooner or later losing their hold on the bone as it recedes over time. Researchers at the Fraunhofer IAP have been working alongside the Fraunhofer IGB and the Fraunhofer CMI to develop a tissue adhesive that can help avoid early replacement of prostheses in the future.
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Surgery and imaging: mapping the meniscus
A non-trivial player in the anatomical orchestra of the compound joint is the meniscus cartilage. Empa researchers are now creating a "3D map" of the precious cartilage.
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Antimicrobial hospital curtains - Bacteria, stay out!
A coating process can be used to treat fabrics in such a way that bacterial and viral pathogens are killed or inhibited in their growth. In hospitals, the coated textiles could be used in future as antimicrobial curtains between patient beds, for example.
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Imaging: new approaches for medical diagnostics
Imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) are indispensable today for the diagnosis and localization of many diseases. A newly developed procedure now enables PET to be used specifically on the basis of changes in the human genome.
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MHH produces world’s first patient-specific implants with drug release
For the first time, the ENT clinic at Hannover Medical School (MHH) has provided an adult patient with a customized implant for the external auditory canal featuring drug release benefits.
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Parkinson's: New hope when treatment options seem exhausted
As Parkinson's disease progresses, more invasive therapies are used that require brain surgery, for example. When these no longer deliver the desired results, physicians often conclude that treatment options are exhausted.
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New device against sudden cardiac death
Hannover Heart Rhythm Center at MHH implants Germany's first innovative defibrillator with an electrode under the sternum.
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Enhancing melanoma detection in primary care with AI
In a study by Linköping University, an AI-based mobile app has shown high precision in diagnosing skin melanoma, offering new hope for early detection. This research marks a significant step forward in utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) for health diagnostics in primary care settings.
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A wireless bladder monitoring device
A new medical device developed by researchers at Northwestern University might soon offer individuals with bladder dysfunctions a way to monitor their condition in real time, thanks to a groundbreaking implant and accompanying smartphone app.
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UCLA engineers develop a new wearable device for voice restoration
UCLA bioengineers have introduced an AI-assisted wearable device, a significant stride in speech technology for individuals with voice disorders. This adhesive neck patch could change how people with pathological vocal cord conditions or post-laryngeal cancer surgeries communicate, offering a new beacon of hope for those who find speaking a challenge.
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Medical textiles and sensors enhance skin protection in healthcare
In recent years, advancements in medical textiles and sensor technologies have brought about improvements in skin protection within the healthcare sector. From pressure-equalizing mattresses designed for newborns to intelligent sensor systems aimed at preventing pressure injuries in adults, these inventions have the potential to improve patient care and enhance overall well-being.
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Prototype applies AI to advance colorectal diagnosis
Portuguese researchers from the Institute for Systems and Computer Engineering, Technology and Science (INESC TEC) and the IMP Diagnostics Molecular & Anatomic Pathology laboratory have unveiled the world's first prototype applying Artificial Intelligence (AI) to colorectal diagnosis.
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Monitoring heart patients at home – the e-health tool
The Amsterdam University Medical Center announces the implementation of the HartWacht (HeartGuard) app to enhance patient care at its Heart Centre. Developed by the Cardiology Centers Netherlands (CCN), this e-health tool enables remote monitoring of blood pressure and arrhythmias, empowering patients to manage their conditions from home effectively.
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Wireless drug patch: advancing chronic disease treatment
Advancements in drug delivery technology are paving the way for innovative treatment methods for chronic diseases. A recent breakthrough at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill introduces the Spatiotemporal On-Demand Patch (SOP), a wireless drug delivery system that could revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and neurological injuries.
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KAIST research team develops sweat-resistant wearable robot sensor
In a significant technological breakthrough, a research team from KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) has unveiled a groundbreaking electromyography (EMG) sensor that promises to revolutionize the field of wearable robots.
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Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation with smart bracelet
Atrial fibrillation, the most prevalent heart rhythm disorder impacting 33 million people worldwide, can have serious consequences if left untreated. To address this pressing issue, researchers have unveiled a technology aimed at identifying and managing individual factors contributing to atrial fibrillation.
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Evaluating brain tumours with artificial intelligence
One application area of artificial intelligence (AI) is in medicine, especially in medical diagnostics. For instance, scans can be analysed automatically with the help of algorithms. An international and interdisciplinary team led by researchers from TU Darmstadt recently investigated whether AI can better evaluate images of brain tumours.
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CERTAINTY: virtual twin for improved cancer immunotherapies
Together with partners from science, industry and the healthcare sector, the project team led by the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI aims to develop a virtual twin that will improve treatment with personalized cancer immunotherapies in the future.
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Wearable for the visually impaired: Vibrations lead the way
The German Institutes of Textile and Fiber Research Denkendorf (DITF) have developed a contacting process with which orientation aids - and e-textiles in general - can be produced more economically and conveniently.
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AI can identify women with high risk of breast cancer screenings
The use of AI makes it possible for women with a high risk of breast cancer to be identified in mammography screening examinations so that the cancer can be caught earlier. An international research group led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden can now show that the method is effective in different European countries.
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Kulmbach Live-in Lab: holistic research on digital health
The possibilities for researching human behaviour with the help of artificial intelligence are being taken to the next level in Kulmbach: The Live-in Lab there is Europe's leading laboratory for digital, AI-supported research into human behaviour in everyday life. It has now been opened.
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Computer model of the ear may help to improve cochlear implants
Professor Pavel Jungwirth and his colleagues from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences and the cochlear implant company MED-EL, based in Austria, have come up with a complete computer model of the ear. It can be used to simulate hearing of mammals including humans from the outer ear all the way to the auditory nerve.
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Mindable App approved for the treatment of panic disorders and claustrophobia
A team led by Dr. Thomas Lang, psychology professor at Constructor University, has developed an app that patients can use to bridge waiting times to receive therapy.
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New computer code for mechanics of tissues and cells in three dimensions
Open-source supercomputer algorithm predicts patterning and dynamics of living materials and enables studying their behavior in space and time.
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PAMELA – Prevention and management of phantom limb pain via app
The loss of an arm or leg has a huge impact on quality of life. In addition to the restrictions that an amputation means for daily activities, those affected often suffer from phantom pain, which is difficult to treat.
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Models that predict poor clinical outcome in COVID-19 patients
Factors associated with hospital admissions, ICU stays and mortality in patients who have had SARS-CoV-2 are identified, and clinical prediction rules are developed.
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Informed consent to the use of personal health data
Millions of people worldwide use health and wellness applications to record health-related parameters such as symptoms, step count or heart rate in their everyday lives. This citizen-generated health data provides previously unknown information about a person's experience of illness and health.
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Strengthening of drug bioinformatics at the Saarbrücken site
In the context of the tenure negotiations for Drug Bioinformatics Professor Olga Kalinina, the Klaus Faber Foundation is providing €100,000 to the "bioINFpro" project, thereby enabling her long-term stay at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and Saarland University.
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How can wearables help to protect farmers well-being
The AgWearCare project resorts to wearables to collect and digitalise data, supporting agricultural tasks and preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders.
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MEDICA 2023: Checking for counterfeit medication using a smartphone
The SmartID counterfeit-proof barcode system means anyone can use a smartphone to check a product is genuine, provided the manufacturer uses SmartID.
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MEDICA 2023: Simple and enhanced analysis and visualization of medical image data
A team of researchers from Kaiserslautern and Leipzig is working on a system that automatically analyses and visualises medical data, including their uncertainties.
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Skin cancer diagnoses using AI are as reliable as those made by medical experts
An Austrian-Australian research team led by dermatologist Harald Kittler from MedUni Vienna investigated the extent to which diagnosis and therapy of pigmented skin lesions benefit from it in a realistic clinical scenario.
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Liver cancer treatment: Utilizing magnetic field-guided microrobots
A new medical technique utilizing magnet-guided microrobots for treating liver tumors has been developed by a Canadian research team, offering a potential new approach in oncology.
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The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment
At the University Hospital Wuerzburg, a promising new treatment for knee joint defects involves the use of nasal cartilage, and it's edging closer to approval with significant EU funding. The new method is using autologous cartilage from the nasal septum, an approach that may seem as enchanting as the term "ENCANTO" implies.
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Diabetes: technology enhances molecular understanding
With over seven million individuals in Germany affected by diabetes, science still faces challenges in drug research. However, under the leadership of Prof. Peter Loskill from both the NMI and the University of Tübingen, scientists have devised a method that markedly enhances our understanding at the molecular and cellular levels within the pancreas.
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Advanced cell sorting with laser and AI
The Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT and for Production Technology IPT developed a new AI-assisted high-throughput process that enhances cell isolation. This presents vast implications for personalized medicine, drug development, and clinical research.
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HZDR team introduces novel pathogen detection approach
Detecting diseases early or predicting their onset is crucial for healthcare. Dr. Larysa Baraban's team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) develops miniaturized biosensor devices using nanomaterials.
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Determine stroke risk early with tear fluid, mitochondria and AI
Over 100 million people globally suffer from strokes annually, with ischemic strokes being the most common. However, many strokes go undetected, leading to severe consequences like dementia or depression. Prof. Olga Golubnitschaja from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has spearheaded a comprehensive approach to assess stroke risk early, focusing on predictive medicine.
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Faster and more accurate pathogen detection through DNA melting
Unlike conventional blood cultures, which can take anywhere from 15 hours to several days to yield results, the new digital DNA melting analysis delivers actionable insights in under six hours. This accelerated turnaround time enables clinicians to initiate targeted treatment strategies promptly, minimizing the risk of disease progression and improving patient outcomes.
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Advanced 3D printing technology improves tissue engineering
Advancements in 3D printing technology are improving tissue engineering, offering promising prospects for the artificial production of biological tissues. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have developed a changing technique that combines hydrogels and fibers, opening new avenues for tissue fabrication.
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EU-Funded Project PAIR improves pandemic preparedness
The EU-funded project PAIR has just started in Copenhagen with the participation of 20 partners from seven countries. This five-year project aims to ensure that Europe possesses the expertise and capabilities for advanced point-of-care systems and prognostic models based on artificial intelligence and machine learning.
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Revolutionizing liver disease research with 3D bioprinted model
Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a liver disease characterized by inflammation and scarring, reaching epidemic proportions with an estimated 1.5 percent to 6.5 percent of U.S. adults affected.
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Nasal antibody spray demonstrates potential for COVID-19 prevention
Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have achieved a significant breakthrough in COVID-19 prevention with the development of a nasal antibody spray. This approach offers new possibilities for enhanced protection against SARS-CoV-2 and its various variants, providing hope for high-risk individuals.
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Enhancing urinary tract infection diagnosis with AI
Researchers at Fraunhofer Austria and the AULSS2 Marca Trevigiana Institute in Treviso have leveraged artificial intelligence (AI) to streamline the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their advanced AI-based method promises to significantly reduce the workload of laboratories and expedite diagnosis times.
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Protecting against zika virus with a microarray patch
In the global fight against the Zika virus, researchers are developing a vaccine patch that promises an effective and painless solution. This needle-free vaccine patch, utilizing the high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP).
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A sugar analysis could reveal different types of cancer
In the future, a little saliva may be enough to detect an incipient cancer. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed an effective way to interpret the changes in sugar molecules that occur in cancer cells.
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Understanding and fighting tumors better with new algorithms
The University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the diagnostics company Roche are expanding their collaboration in cancer research. In the fully digitalized Morphomolecular Pathology Laboratory, they are developing algorithms that can further improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies.
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Chronic lung diseases: funding for precision medicine
Associate Professor Dr Jonas Schupp receives funding for his research into chronic lung diseases.
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MS and Sjögren's: the same and yet different
MHH project investigates differences in neurological symptoms between multiple sclerosis and the rare Sjögren's syndrome.
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Detecting side effects of new drugs on the heart more efficiently
Scientists at the University Medical Center and the University of Göttingen have developed a novel method to predict the side effects of new drugs and therapeutic approaches on the heart more efficiently.
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PicoRuler: Molecular rulers for high-resolution microscopy
A team from the Rudolf Virchow Zentrum – Center for Integrative and Translational Bioimaging at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg, led by Dr Gerti Beliu and Professor Markus Sauer, presents a groundbreaking advance for the world of high-resolution fluorescence microscopy.
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AI used in new COVID-19 test improves accuracy
A new AI-assisted molecular diagnostic platform capable of identifying variants of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases has been developed by scientists in the UK. The low cost, portable device could play a crucial role in preventing future pandemics due to its accuracy and versatility.
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New era of cyborganics – Prof. Ivan Minev receives ERC Consolidator Grant
Over the next five years, the ERC will provide two million euro of funding for the development of a new class of electronic components that consist almost entirely of water and could make the interface between biological tissue and machine seamless.
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Pancreas: nanoparticles for optimized cancer therapy
Researchers from Göttingen and Karlsruhe have developed a new treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. The innovative method promises to be able to treat the disease in a more targeted way and with fewer side effects in the future. The therapy is now to be optimized for clinical application as quickly as possible.
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Affordable global health technologies for early cancer detection
A Rice University-led collaboration from three continents has won up to a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a premier research center in the Texas Medical Center to develop affordable, effective point-of-care (POC) technologies that improve early cancer detection in low-resource settings in the United States and other countries.
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World’s first commercial deployment of novel soft X-ray microscope
SiriusXT Ltd, an Irish technology SME, announced the world’s first commercial deployment of the SXT-100, the company’s unique table-top Soft X-ray Microscope with applications in disease research and the drug discovery process, at the UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research at University College Dublin.
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Project CANACO: better imaging-based and targeted therapy of colon cancer
The University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) is coordinating the development of a new nanoparticle-based method for the personalized therapy of patients suffering from colon cancer.
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Mobile patient lifts enhance ICU patient recovery
Discovering new methods to enhance the recovery process for ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients is crucial in improving their overall outcomes. A recent study conducted in Tokyo, Japan, sheds light on the efficacy of early mobilization, supported by mobile patient lifts, in facilitating patient recovery.
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Hand prostheses: Artificial intelligence makes gripping more intuitive
A better understanding of muscle activity patterns in the forearm supports a more intuitive and natural control of artificial limbs. This requires a network of 128 sensors and artificial intelligence based techniques.
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GyroTrainer with AI: Individual back training machine
The GyroTrainer is an intelligent training device that resembles a balance board. It uses artificial intelligence to adjust the difficulty level to the individual patient’s current ability.
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3D printable prostheses to restore amputees' finger mobility
A groundbreaking, easy-to-use 3D printable finger prosthesis created by a recent University of Houston graduate could offer amputees a low-cost solution to restore finger functionality.
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Cerebral Palsy: multicomponent exercise improves physical functioning in children and young adults
A new study carried out at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, found that an individually tailored exercise program improves motor function, muscle strength and joint mobility in children and young adults with CP.
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Bidirectional control of prosthetic hands using ultrasonic sensors
Researchers at Fraunhofer are working as part of an EU research project to improve control of prosthetic hands down to individual fingers.
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Sensor and software to promote office staff’s physical activity
TU Dresden researchers have analyzed the mechanics of office chairs and developed a sensor that, in combination with a dedicated software, can in the future help employees move more and more consciously during office work.
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AI-based system will help people after stroke
The joint study by Rytis Maskeliūnas, a researcher at Kaunas University of Technology, Faculty of Informatics (KTU IF), and Lithuanian researchers is focused on creating an artificial intelligence (AI)-based system that aims to facilitate the rehabilitation process.
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Bionic hand: surgical and engineering innovations enable unprecedented control
For the first time, a person with an arm amputation can manipulate each finger of a bionic hand as if it was his own. Thanks to revolutionary surgical and engineering advancements that seamlessly merge humans with machines, this breakthrough offers new hope and possibilities for people with amputations worldwide.
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AI supports rehabilitation after spinal cord injury
An intelligent suit is hoped to significantly improve rehabilitation after a serious spinal cord injury. The AI-supported solution will be developed over the next three years by researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) working in collaboration with Heidelberg University and Heidelberg University Hospital.
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Ankle exosuit: more independence for post-stroke wearers
Designed for independent use in community settings, the new exosuit could help stroke survivors improve their gait outside of the lab and during their daily routines.
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Weekly magnetic muscle therapy improves mobility and lean body mass in older adults
A decline in functional mobility, loss of muscle strength and an increase in body fats are often associated with ageing. This trend could potentially be reversed by way of an innovative magnetic muscle therapy pioneered by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS).
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Low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses
A low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses: The ARM2u biomedical engineering team, from the UPC’s Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB), is working on new functions for their low-cost 3D-printed transradial prosthesis.
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Physical activity crucial for poststroke recovery
After a stroke, physical activity can be pivotal to successful recovery. People who spend four hours a week exercising after their stroke achieve better functional recovery within six months than those who do not, a University of Gothenburg study shows.
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Kick-off: new Marie Skłodowska-Curie Doctoral Network "ReWIRE"
Through ReWIRE, next-generation scientists will be trained to develop translational breakthrough therapeutic solutions for patients with paralysis caused by traumatic spinal cord injuries.
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3D-printed insoles measure sole pressure directly in the shoe
Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and EPFL are developing a 3D-printed insole with integrated sensors that allows the pressure of the sole to be measured in the shoe and thus during any activity.
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Poor balance may indicate changes in brain volume
In a study recently published in Gait & Posture, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that the volume of the hippocampus is correlated with a measure of balance ability in healthy older people.
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Balance ability predicts cognitive impairment
In a study recently published in BMC Geriatrics, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed a new measure of physical balance that could help to identify individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD).
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Mechanical stimulation could be used to prevent falls and strengthen muscles
Mechanical vibrations could help improve our muscles and our balance control, according to research at Aston University. Researchers in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences have examined the effect of stimulation on muscle spindles which ‘speak’ to the central nervous system to help keep us upright and walk straight.
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Affordable device for fixing broken bones piloted in Gaza, Sri Lanka and Ukraine
Imperial researchers have developed a low-cost, easy-to-manufacture stabiliser for broken bones to help in regions where such devices are expensive or in short supply and people sometimes resort to homemade options.
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Total knee arthroplasty: Faster knee for better walking
Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have revealed that knee extension velocity while seated is a stronger predictor of walking performance than muscle strength in elderly patients after their total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery.
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A prosthetic limb that can read my mind
A team at FAU is investigating how intelligent prostheses can be improved. The idea is that interactive artificial intelligence will help the prostheses to recognize human intent better, to register their surroundings and to continue to develop and improve over time.
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Treatment for back pain: 84 percent increase in success rate
Multimodal therapies should be promoted on a larger scale in the German healthcare system, in line with the National Disease Management Guidelines.
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Rehab device enables stroke patients with arm disabilities to do more physical training
The GribAble device, created by researchers at Imperial College London and clinicians at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, consists of a lightweight electronic handgrip that interacts wirelessly with a standard PC tablet to enable the user to play arm-training games.
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High-dose gait training with robotic exoskeleton after acute stroke
Preliminary findings by Kessler researchers show that the use of a robotic exoskeleton during inpatient rehabilitation for acute stroke may improve function. Gait training in the robotic exoskeleton can provide high-dose therapy soon after stroke, when it is likely to have its maximal effect on functional ambulation.
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UGRSKIN: artificial skin as a game-changer in burn treatment
The University of Granada (UGR) has pioneered a solution for burn treatment with its artificial skin “UGRSKIN”. Developed by the Tissue Engineering Research Group, this advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) has improved the approach to treating severe burns, offering patients new hope and enhanced outcomes.
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Tailored medical adhesives for personalized healing
POSTECH researchers led by Prof. Hyung Joon Cha, alongside colleagues, introduced groundbreaking personalized underwater bio-adhesive patches (CUBAP) derived from mussel adhesive proteins. This discovery, featured in Advanced Materials, improves biomedical adhesives, offering tailored internal healing solutions.
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Antiviral resin destroys COVID-19 from plastic surfaces
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland are pioneering the development of antiviral surfaces to mitigate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly focusing on coronaviruses.
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Smart wound sealing with nanoparticles and light soldering
Empa researchers have pioneered a novel soldering process that employs nanoparticles and lasers to gently fuse tissue, ushering in a new era in wound closure.
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Sterilization: how bacteria defend themselves against plasmas
A research team headed by Professor Julia Bandow and Dr. Tim Dirks from the Chair for Applied Microbiology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, showed that bacteria that overproduce the heat shock protein Hsp33 can withstand plasma treatment more effectively than others.
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EPA testing shows the power of D-I-Y air filters to trap viruses
There is a low-cost way for you to protect yourself and reduce your risk of respiratory diseases such as flu, RSV, and COVID-19. Build yourself a Corsi-Rosenthal box (CR box) in 30 minutes with just $60 worth of common hardware store supplies.
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Biomaterials: toolbox for the development of bioadhesives
The team of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel, Chair of Biomaterials at the University of Bayreuth, has compiled a current overview of the state of research on protein-based bioadhesives.
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Jasmina Gačanin investigates living biomaterials
Dr. Jasmina Gačanin, postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in the department of Prof. Dr. Tanja Weil, has been appointed as a “Peretti-Schmucker Fellow”.
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Adsorber in blood purification: widely used, no proven benefit
Many hospitals use the adsorber CytoSorb to purify the blood of seriously ill patients in order to trap inflammatory substances and prevent the life-threatening cytokine storm. MHH researchers have now found in a meta-study that the treatment does not reduce mortality and may even cause harm.
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NOVA project: next generation of antimicrobial coating technologies
Researchers develop and test highly efficient, environmentally friendly and stable antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) coating technologies in the NOVA project.
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Sensor patch for abdominal surgery
Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a plaster with a sensor function to ensure that wounds in the abdomen remain tightly closed after an operation.
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Tissue Engineering: TU Graz revolutionises production of biocompatible microfibres
Using a newly developed method for the efficient and cost-effective production of biocompatible microfibres, the production of autologous skin and organs can be significantly accelerated. Responsible for the development are Carole Planchette and her team from TU Graz.
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Hygiene: monkeypox viruses relatively stable on surfaces
A study conducted by the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has shown that temperature is a major factor in this process: at room temperature, a monkeypox virus that is capable of replicating can survive on a stainless steel surface for up to eleven days, and at four degrees Celsius for up to a month.
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Regenerative medicine: cell-specific properties of novel spider silk materials
Materials made of spider silk can be specifically modified or processed in such a way that living cells of a certain type adhere to them, grow and proliferate. This has been discovered by researchers at the University of Bayreuth under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel.
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Wound dressing reveals infection
A nanocellulose wound dressing that can reveal early signs of infection without interfering with the healing process has been developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
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‘Smart’ bandages monitor wounds and provide targeted treatment
Most of the time, when someone gets a cut, scrape, burn, or other wound, the body takes care of itself and heals on its own. But this is not always the case. Diabetes can interfere with the healing process and create wounds that will not go away and that could become infected and fester.
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Incubators: method to reduce alcohol absorbed from disinfectants used
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba showed the association between the concentration of evaporated alcohol from alcohol-based disinfectants used for incubators and the amount of alcohol absorbed by premature infants.
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Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders
The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
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New ultrafast water disinfection method is more environmentally friendly
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have found a way to use small shocks of electricity to disinfect water, reducing energy consumption, cost, and environmental impact.
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Mucus-based gel improves bone graft results, promotes healing
Molecules from mucus can be used to produce synthetic bone graft material and help with the healing of larger bone loss, a new study found.
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Bioresorbable membrane for healing internal and external wounds
Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in using the bioresorbable silica gel Renacer to produce an electrospun membrane that is neither cytotoxic to cells nor genotoxic.
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Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials
A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Treating cornea ulcers with diagnostic light instead of corneal transplantation
Recently, a Korean joint research team from POSTECH-KKU has developed a new tissue adhesive that restores the damaged cornea by simply filling it and exposing it to light.
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Wound care: New spray fights infections and antibiotic resistance
A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden are presenting a new spray that can kill even antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and that can be used for wound care and directly on implants and other medical devices.
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Contact lenses to treat dry eye syndrome
A collaborative team from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) has developed a contact lens prototype that is specifically designed to prevent contact lens-induced dry eye (CLIDE).
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