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Headphone-Distracted Pedestrians face Death

Headphone-Distracted Pedestrians face Death

In many cases, the cars or trains are sounding horns that the pedestrians cannot hear, leading to fatalities in nearly three-quarters of cases. "Everybody is aware of the risk of cell phones and texting in automobiles, but I see more and more teens distracted with the latest devices and headphones in their ears," says Doctor Richard Lichenstein. "Unfortunately as we make more and more enticing devices, the risk of injury from distraction and blocking out other sounds increases."

Researchers reviewed 116 accident cases from 2004 to 2011 in which injured pedestrians were documented to be using headphones. Seventy per cent of the 116 accidents resulted in death to the pedestrian. More than two-thirds of victims were male (68 per cent) and under the age of 30 (67 per cent). More than half of the moving vehicles involved in the accidents were trains (55 per cent), and nearly a third (29 per cent) of the vehicles reported sounding some type of warning horn prior to the crash. The increased incidence of accidents over the years closely corresponds to documented rising popularity of auditory technologies with headphones.

Lichenstein and his colleagues noted two likely phenomena associated with these injuries and deaths: distraction and sensory deprivation. The distraction caused by the use of electronic devices has been coined "inattentional blindness," in which multiple stimuli divide the brain's mental resource allocation. In cases of headphone-wearing pedestrian collisions with vehicles, the distraction is intensified by sensory deprivation, in which the pedestrian’s ability to hear a train or car warning signal is masked by the sounds produced by the portable electronic device and headphones.

Lichenstein says the study was initiated after reviewing a tragic paediatric death where a local teen died crossing railroad tracks. The teen was noted to be wearing headphones and did not avoid the oncoming train despite auditory alarms. Further review revealed other cases not only in Maryland but in other states too. "As a paediatric emergency physician and someone interested in safety and prevention I saw this as an opportunity to - at a minimum - alert parents of teens and young adults of the potential risk of wearing headphones where moving vehicles are present," he says.

MEDICA.de; Source: University of Maryland Medical Centre

 
 
 

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