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Protein Breakdown Contributes to Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Protein Breakdown Contributes to Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Photo: Illustration of the sexual organs of a woman

Pelvic organ prolapse affects many women older than 50 years of age. Besides creating pelvic pressure, prolapse can lead to other pelvic-floor disorders such as urinary and fecal incontinence, and can affect sexual function.

"We found that the protein fibulin-5, which until now simply has been known to be important in generating elastic fibers, actually blocks the enzymes that degrade proteins that support the vaginal wall structure," said Doctor R. Ann Word, professor of obstetrics and gynaecology. "The elastic fibers do play a role, but it's also the enzymes that degrade the matrix that break down both collagen and elastin over time."

More than 225,000 inpatient surgical procedures for pelvic organ prolapse are performed each year in the U.S. at an estimated cost of more than $1 billion. But surgery alone is not always effective in the long run; nearly 30 percent of women report continued problems over a five-year follow-up period because the underlying problem of matrix support has not been corrected. There are no current therapies to prevent the progression of prolapse.

Age and vaginal delivery are the two most common risk factors for prolapse; injury to the vaginal wall may occur during childbirth but prolapse often doesn't occur until decades later. Obesity and menopause are also contributing factors.

"We still don't understand why patient A has a terrible delivery, with a large baby, but she never gets prolapse. And then we see patients who are 28 with no children, and they're already starting to have problems. So we know genetic and environmental factors contribute to this," Word said.

Using mice, researchers tested how fibulin-5, a protein that is essential for elastic fiber assembly, regulated the activity of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9), a group of enzymes that break down the matrix of collagen and elastic fibers, leading to a loss of the structural support of the vaginal wall.

Researchers used a fibulin-5 deficient rodent model and a new domain-specific mutant of fibulin-5 to demonstrate that fibulin-5-mediated elastogenesis (development of elastic fibers) is essential to support the pelvic organs. They also showed that prolapse of the vaginal wall requires an increase in MMP-9, but that fibulin-5 inhibits activation of this protease in a tissue-specific manner.

"Matrix assembly of the vaginal wall is a very complicated process," said Doctor Hiromi Yanagisawa, assistant professor of molecular biology. "We need to decode what is necessary in this process, but degrading enzymes are the main therapeutic focus."


MEDICA.de; Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center

 
 
 

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