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'Grow Rett Syndrome' in a Petri dish

'Grow Rett Syndrome' in a Petri dish

Photo: Petri dish


The researchers describe how the team used a newly-devised procedure to reprogram the skins cells - literally winding back their developmental clock to an earlier state and transforming them into stem cells. The researchers then employed a second novel technique, taking the newly-formed stem cells and driving them along a developmental path to form nerve cells.

When Doctor Alysson Muotri and his team at the University of California examined these new nerve cells closely, they observed characteristic hallmarks of nerve cells with Rett syndrome, including fewer synapses, smaller cell bodies and changes in the cells' signaling capabilities. The group then took their work a step further; testing several drugs previously shown to be effective in mouse models of Rett syndrome, they provided evidence of functional rescue, using human cells.

In 1999, the laboratory of Doctor Huda Zoghbi at Baylor College of Medicine, made a seminal discovery, identifying a causative link between mutations in the gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and Rett syndrome. This led to further work showing the MeCP2 protein is critical for the proper functioning of nerve cells. In 2007 another study in the laboratory of Doctor Adrian Bird at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland showed that restoration of MeCP2 function in a mouse model of the disease reverses the neurological symptoms in adult mice. This finding provided a critical proof of concept that symptoms of the disorder may be reversible in humans. However, to date, no effective pharmacological treatments have been developed.

The main limitation for human studies and thus, drug development, has been the inaccessibility of live neurons from human patients. To get around this issue, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to establish a human cell-based model of Rett syndrome is key to the development of high throughput drug screens and therefore has been an area of the highest priority. Muotri, said, "Doctor Bird's data shows that you can reverse symptoms in a mouse model, now we've shown that this could be done using human cells." "I think the future is to push this in a high throughput screening platform to develop new drugs," he continued.

IRSF recently provided funding to support a new program for Rett syndrome-specific drug development, titled the "Selected Molecular Agents for Rett Therapeutics" (SMART) Initiative. The SMART Initiative will assemble a collection of brain-specific drugs that target select biological mechanisms important in RTT and make the compound collection available to researchers worldwide.

IRSF's Chief Scientific Officer, Doctor Antony Horton said "IRSF has been proactive in moving iPSC technology forward for the purpose of drug screening, which is aligned well with the new SMART Initiative." "With the publication of this study, a major hurdle has been overcome in our quest to develop and test new medicines for the benefit of people living with Rett syndrome." added Horton.

MEDICA.de; Source: International Rett Syndrome Foundation

 
 
 

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