Main content of this page

Anchor links to the different areas of information in this page:

You are here: MEDICA Portal. MEDICA Magazine. Archive. Skin.

Increased risk for having a malignant tumour in later life

Increased risk for having a malignant tumour in later life

Almost 20 percent of survivors in this Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) who were diagnosed with basal or squamous cell skin cancer developed another more aggressive cancer within 15 years, said Gregory Armstrong, assistant member of the St. Jude Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control.:“These findings suggest non-melanoma skin cancers are a potential marker for survivors who are at risk for future invasive malignancies.”

The study involved 14,358 childhood cancer survivors whose cancer was diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. All are now participating in the CCSS, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute to track the health outcomes of childhood cancer survivors. Childhood cancer survivors are known to be at increased risk for additional cancers, which remain a leading cause of disability and death among those who beat cancer the first time. “This study is the first to track the risk of multiple malignancies in a large group of aging cancer survivors”, Armstrong said. The average survivor in this study was age 36.

Nearly 10 percent of study participants, or 1,383 survivors, reported being diagnosed with a second tumour. The group included 231 survivors found to have a third tumour and 153 individuals diagnosed with four or more. The analysis found that nearly 39 percent of childhood survivors diagnosed with one subsequent tumour went on to develop another within 15 years.

MEDICA.de; Source:St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

 
 
 

More informations and functions

 
© Messe Düsseldorf printed by www.MEDICA.de