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Decreasing Among Whites, But Not Blacks

Decreasing Among Whites, But Not Blacks

The incidence of blood clot-related strokes fell among whites in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area for the first time, according to a new long-term surveillance study. However, there was no decrease in stroke rates among blacks.

“It’s encouraging that, for the first time ever in our study area, there is a drop in the most common type of stroke,” said Dawn Kleindorfer, lead author of the study. “However, it’s very disappointing that the racial disparity seems to be getting worse.”

Investigators found that the age-adjusted annual rate of ischemic stroke (those caused by a blood clot) resulting in hospitalization changed between 1999 and 2005 from:

  • 189 to 167 per 100,000 overall, an 11.6 percent drop;
  • 180 to 154 per 100,000 among whites, a 14.4 percent reduction;
  • 263 to 275 per 100,000 among blacks, a 4.6 percent rise, but not a significant change.

The patterns remained the same when out-of-hospital strokes were included. During the same period, researchers found no change in the rate of hemorrhagic strokes (those caused by bleeding). The likelihood of dying after an ischemic stroke remained steady over time and was similar in whites and blacks, about ten percent, according to the report.

Researchers used data from the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study, which gathered information on all first strokes occurring in a five-county area with 1.3 million people. The counties include urban, suburban and rural areas. It’s comparable to the nation in education, income and in the percentage of blacks (18 percent), but does not include a substantial proportion of persons of Hispanic ethnicity (less than three percent).

MEDICA.de; Source: American Heart Association

 
 
 

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