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Sonic Equivalent Developed

Sonic Equivalent Developed

Scientists at the University of Nottingham, in collaboration with colleagues in the Ukraine, have produced a new type of acoustic laser device called a Saser. It's a sonic equivalent to the laser and produces an intense beam of uniform sound waves on a nano scale. The new device could have significant and useful applications in the worlds of computing and medical imaging.

The Saser mimics the laser technology but using sound, to produce a sonic beam of 'phonons' which travels, not through an optical cavity like a laser, but through a tiny manmade structure called a 'superlattice'. This is made out of around 50 super-thin sheets of two alternating semiconductor materials, Gallium Arsenide and Aluminium Arsenide, each layer just a few atoms thick. When stimulated by a power source (a light beam), the phonons multiply, bouncing back and forth between the layers of the lattice, until they escape out of the structure in the form of an ultra-high frequency phonon beam.

A key factor in this new science is that the Saser is the first device to emit sound waves in the terahertz frequency range. Crucially the 'superlattice' device can be used to generate, manipulate and detect these sound waves making the Saser capable of widespread scientific and technological applications. One example of its potential is as a sonogram, to look for defects in nanometre scale objects like micro-electric circuits. Another idea is to convert the Saser beam to THz electromagnetic waves, which may be used for medical imaging and security screening.

MEDICA.de; Source: University of Nottingham

 
 

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