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High Intake of Dietary Fibre Not Associated with Reduction

High Intake of Dietary Fibre Not Associated with Reduction

Dietary fibre has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to background information in the article. However, the results of numerous epidemiological studies have been inconsistent.

Yikyung Park, Sc.D., formerly of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the association between dietary fibre intake and risk of colorectal cancer by reanalyzing the primary data from 13 prospective cohort studies. The pooled analysis included 725,628 men and women who were followed-up for 6 to 20 years across studies.

During the follow-up, 8,081 colorectal cancer cases were identified. Among the studies, median energy-adjusted dietary fibre intake ranged from 14 to 28 g/d in men and from 13 to 24 g/d in women.

In the age-adjusted model, dietary fibre intake was significantly associated with a 16 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer in the highest quintile compared with the lowest. This association was attenuated slightly but still remained statistically significant after adjusting for nondietary risk factors, multivitamin use, and total energy intake. Additional adjustment for dietary folate intake further weakened the association. In the final model, which further adjusted for other dietary factors, such as red meat, total milk, and alcohol intake, only a nonsignificant weak inverse association was found. Fibre intake from cereals, fruits, and vegetables was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer.

“In conclusion, we did not find support for a linear inverse association between dietary fibre intake and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 13 prospective cohort studies. Although high dietary fibre intake may not have a major effect on the risk of colorectal cancer, a diet high in dietary fibre from whole plant foods can be advised because this has been related to lower risks of other chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes,” the researchers write.

MEDICA.de; Source: American Medical Association (AMA)

 
 

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