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Alcohol Consumption Increases Risk Of Gout

Alcohol Consumption Increases Risk Of Gout


Alcohol consumption causes hyperuricaemia (increased production of uric acid) which when deposited in joints leads to gout. The association between alcohol consumption and risk of gout has been suspected since ancient times, but has not been prospectively confirmed. Additionally, potential differences in risk of gout posed by different alcoholic beverages have not been assessed.

Hyon K Choi from Massachusetts General Hospital, USA, and colleagues prospectively assessed alcohol consumption and incidence of gout among 47,000 men over a 12-year period. 730 cases of gout were confirmed throughout the study period. Alcohol consumption was assessed as the quantity consumed relative to the typical ethanol content of alcoholic drinks: 12.8 g for one can of beer, 11.0 g for a glass of wine, and 14.0 g for a shot of spirits.

Compared with people who did not drink, alcohol consumption was linked to gout risk, with higher overall consumption increasing this risk: around a 30 per cent increased risk for daily alcohol consumption between 10 and 15 g, around 50 per cent increased risk for daily consumption between 15 and 30 g, around a doubling of gout risk for consumption between 30 and 50 g and a 2.5 times increased risk for a daily alcohol consumption above 50 g.

Choi comments: "We found differences in the risk of gout for the three alcoholic beverages. Two or more beers per day increased the risk of gout 2.5-fold compared with no beer intake, whereas the same frequency of spirits intake increased the risk by 1.6 times compared with no spirits intake. Further, wine consumption of two glasses or more per day was not associated with an increased risk of gout.”

MEDICA.de, Source: The Lancet

 
 
 

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