Image: A scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Frank Peters

Lifetime weight gain linked to esophageal and stomach cancers

17/02/2017

People who are overweight in their twenties and become obese later in life may be three times more likely to develop cancer of either the oesophagus (food pipe) or upper stomach, according to a study published in the "British Journal of Cancer".
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Image: Different types of fast food; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

One fifth of Indonesian households exhibit double burden of malnutrition

16/02/2017

The coexistence of both undernutrition and overweight/obesity, a phenomenon called double burden of malnutrition, is a global public health challenge existing at all levels from the individual to the population, especially in low-to middle-income countries. Research on malnutrition in Indonesia found that about 20 percent of households exhibit double burden of malnutrition.
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Image: Stacked cube sugar, in the background a spoon full of sugar; Copyright: panthermedia.net/tycoon751

Glucose or fructose: The impact of sugar on cardiovascular health

13/02/2017

The kind of consumed sugar – not only the taken quantity – can determine the risk of suffering from metabolic and vascular diseases, according to a study carried out on laboratory animals and led by Professor Marta Alegret, from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona (IBUB).
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Image: Different kinds of nuts; Copyright: panthermedia.net/fotokris44

Hard shell - healthy kernel

10/02/2017

Roasted and salted, ground as a baking ingredient or fresh from the shell - for all those who enjoy eating nuts, there is good news from nutritionists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Their latest research shows that nuts can inhibit the growth of cancer cells.
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UK: salt reduction strategies do not address health inequalities

07/02/2017

New research conducted by the University of Liverpool in partnership with the universities of Gdansk and Manchester shows that current salt reduction strategy in England has failed to reduce existing inequalities in salt consumption, cardiovascular disease, and gastric cancer burdens.
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Vitamin D discovery could prove key to new treatments

02/02/2017

A team led by Motonari Uesugi, professor and deputy director of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), found that a vitamin D metabolite known as '25-OHD' inhibits proteins that regulate lipid production.
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Image: A wooden plate with nuts and grains on it and a card with the letter E; Copyright: panthermedia.net/13-smile

Millions of people with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E

20/01/2017

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity.
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Older adults: Vitamin D reduces respiratory infections, may increase falls

10/01/2017

In people over the age of 65, acute respiratory infections - such as the common cold, influenza, or pneumonia - can lead to potentially life-threatening complications.
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Image: A baby is being fed; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gresey

How to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

06/01/2017

The wait is over for parents who've been wanting to know how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants to prevent peanut allergy. New, updated guidelines from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) define high, moderate and low-risk infants for developing peanut allergy, and how to proceed with introduction based on risk.
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Image: Graphic of tumorcells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vitanovski

Tumor cells are dependent on fat to start metastasis

08/12/2016

A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. This protein, which is found in the membranes of tumour cells, is responsible for taking up fatty acids.
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Image: Nuts in a bowl with a spoon; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

05/12/2016

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.
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Image: A smiling old man is sitting next to a group of younger people; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Diseases of aging: lifestyle and prevention also pay off

01/12/2016

A German proverb says, "Old age is like a hospital that accepts all diseases," and medicine confirms that older people are not only considerably more susceptible to infectious diseases than they were in middle age, but that body and mind are also less resilient and recover slower or not at all from adverse effects or injuries.
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Image: Heart-shaped bowl with salt; Copyright: panthermedia.net/grafvision

Sodium intake and blood pressure: too much salt is bad for you. What about too little salt?

01/12/2016

Common salt – or sodium chloride – is essential as a stimulant for nerve conduction. What is more, sodium ions also regulate the water balance in the body. Yet when it came to salt consumption, for the longest time the rule was "less is more". However, a recent study publication calls this belief into question.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?

08/04/2016

A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?

01/12/2015

Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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Photo: Small POC test kit for blood samples; Copyright: bate-web/Spelleken

Nutrition: finding intolerances in the blood

27/11/2015

More and more people suffer from allergies and food intolerances. Laboratory diagnosis for these often takes long and can be inaccurate. Healthcare practitioners increasingly rely on point-of-care tests to avoid costly laboratory tests and quickly find solutions for their patients.
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Small companions: How wearables change our lives

01/09/2015

They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
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Photo: Boss and employees

"Employees, who like to contribute their talents, stay healthy"

08/04/2014

Dr. Walter Kromm, Master of Public Health, is not just a general practitioner, but also a health advisor for management professionals. During his many years of practical experience, he kept realizing how important employee health is for the health of an entire company.
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