Yale Biomedical Engineer Receives Early Career Award

Erin Lavik; © Yale University

The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation dedicated to improving human healthcare by supporting translational research in Biomedical Engineering. The awards require collaboration with a clinical investigator affiliated with a practicing clinical environment and are intended to encourage and assist investigators as they establish themselves in academic research careers that involve translational research. Principal investigators receiving an award must have a primary appointment in a Biomedical Engineering department and have received a doctoral degree within the previous six years.

Erin Lavik was granted the award for her project "Sustained delivery of timolol maleate for management of elevated IOP for glaucoma," in collaboration with Young Kwon and Markus Kheun at the University of Iowa.

"There are medications that lower intraocular pressure (IOP) very successfully, but need to be administered several times a day. Unfortunately, many patients with glaucoma are not able to administer eye drops several times a day effectively, and they suffer increased IOP, nerve damage, and ultimately may lose their sight," said Lavik of the rationale for her project. "By developing a long term delivery system, we seek to ease this problem and lay the foundation for the delivery of other drugs in the eye."

"These Early Career Awards acknowledge excellent science, and are specifically targeted to innovative Biomedical Engineering research that will impact clinical care," said W. Mark Saltzman, Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "Excellence in translational medicine is the focus of our new department." The awards are for two years of research funding, and winners will be honoured at an event in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society in October.

MEDICA.de; Source: Yale University