Ultrasound Can Stimulate Different Sensations

Photo: Ultrasound

The world’s first ultrasonic detection device
was developed a century ago; © panther-
media.net/Shojiro Ishihara

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The discovery carries implications for diagnosing and treating neuropathy, which affects millions of people around the world.

“Ideally, neurologists should be able to tailor treatments to the specific sensations their patients are feeling,” said William “Jamie” Tyler. “Unfortunately, even with today’s technologies, it’s difficult to stimulate certain types of sensations without evoking others. Pulsed ultrasound allows us to selectively activate functional subsets of nerve fibers so we can study what happens when you stimulate, for example, only the peripheral fibers and central nervous system pathways that convey the sensation of fast, sharp pain or only those that convey the sensation of slow, dull, throbbing pain.”

An estimated 20 million people in the United States alone suffer from neuropathy, a collection of nervous system disorders that may cause pain, numbness, and sensations of burning, itching, and tingling. One of the most common causes of neuropathy is Type 2 diabetes. Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and Guillain-Barré syndrome; traumatic nerve injury; genetic abnormalities; movement disorders; and infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Lyme disease, and leprosy can also trigger neuropathy.

“Neuropathy involves both motor nerves that control how muscles move and sensory nerves that receive sensations such as heat, pain, and touch,” Tyler said. “So clinicians may use, for example, small resonator devices to vibrate the skin or lasers to heat the surface of the skin. But we wanted to develop a method that could activate superficial and deep mechanical receptors, thermal receptors, and even combinations of both. So we used pulsed ultrasound.”

Tyler believes the finding has important implications for pain diagnosis.

“Current methods of diagnosing and characterizing pain can sometimes seem archaic,” Tyler said. “To measure pain through mechanical stimulation, for example, physicians might touch the skin with nylon monofilaments known as von Frey hairs, or they’ll stroke the skin with a paintbrush. For thermal sensory testing, patients may even plunge their hands into ice water until the pain becomes too great. We’re hoping to provide physicians with more precise diagnostic tools.”

Better diagnostics will lead to better therapeutics, said Michael Friedlander, executive director of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute.

“By combining pulsed ultrasound with the technologies to record brain activity, Jamie Tyler and his colleagues are taking this to a whole new level of diagnostics,” Friedlander said. “And the diagnostics will ultimately drive the therapeutics. This research is a great example of how new technologies can be adapted for real-world, patient-centered diagnoses and treatments.”

MEDICA.de; Source: Virginia Tech