The review looked at two studies that compared the no-scalpel method of vasectomy to the traditional method. The larger study, conducted in 1999, included 1,429 men in five countries. All eight physicians — general surgeons and urologists — had experience with the standard vasectomy technique and three had experience with the no-scalpel method. Inexperienced surgeons received training in the no-scalpel technique.

In this study, men who received no-scalpel vasectomies had less bleeding, bruising, infection and pain during surgery and follow-up. Doctors using the no-scalpel method had more surgical difficulties than those who used the incision method — primarily locating the vas. Even so, the no-scalpel method resulted in a shorter operation. The patients also had a shorter recovery with a quicker resumption of postoperative sexual activity.

The smaller trial included 100 participants treated at a single site in Denmark. None of the eight doctors had substantial experience in the no-scalpel technique. Training was limited to an instructional video and one supervised procedure. The smaller study showed no difference in postoperative results between the two techniques, but this, review authors say, could have been due to the small numbers of participants. Another important factor was the lack of experience that participating doctors had in the no-scalpel technique.

“From the results of the review, we would agree that the no-scalpel methodology is the preferable method to use, as it has lower rate of adverse events,” Dr. Lynley Cook, a public health physician and clinical senior lecturer at the University of Otago in Christchurch, New Zealand said. “But the no-scalpel technique requires more training and a higher level of skill. One of the most important issues for men seeking a vasectomy is the experience of the surgeon with that particular method.”

MEDICA.de; Source: Health Behavior News Service