Systolic Blood Pressure Predicts Mortality

An easily available measurement can
answer many questions; © Picture Disk

These new findings indicate that heart failure patients with higher systolic blood pressures had substantially lower death rates compared to patients with lower systolic pressures, and that lower systolic pressures may indicate more advanced disease and a poorer prognosis. The study also revealed that systolic hypertension is very common in patients admitted to the hospital for heart failure - present in over 50 percent of patients.

“Systolic blood pressure taken at hospital admission was a strong independent predictor of mortality and morbidity in this large, representative heart failure patient population. We hope the findings may help clinicians more effectively stratify risk and offer more targeted treatments based on a patient’s systolic blood pressure level,” said Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, The Eliot Corday Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine and Science, principal investigator and director, Ahmanson-University of California, Los Angeles Cardiomyopathy Center.

Researchers found that patients with higher systolic blood pressures at hospital admission had substantially lower in-hospital and post-discharge mortality rates compared to patients with lower systolic pressures. This finding applied to patients irrespective of their left ventricular ejection fraction, a common measure of ventricular function.

The study revealed the following in-hospital mortality rates by systolic blood pressure levels: 7.2 percent mortality rate for patients with low systolic pressures of less than 120 mm Hg.; 3.6 percent mortality rate for patients with pressures between 120 and 139 mm Hg (generally considered in the normal range); 2.5 percent for patients with higher systolic pressures between 140-161 mm Hg; and 1.7 percent mortality rate for patients with very high systolic pressures over 161 mm Hg.

MEDICA.de; Source: University of California, Los Angeles