Cleankeys Inc.

Study Reveals Dangerous Levels of Contamination on Hospital Keyboards

Keyboard Contamination Levels
Previous studies have shown workplace keyboards to be one of the most germ-infested surfaces, but the hospital workplace creates additional challenges for cleanliness. The current study reveals a serious level of contamination. The proliferation of computer technology in healthcare introduces keyboards to all areas of the hospital care environment. “People are going from wound care of a patient to immediately entering information into the computer. They can carry the microbes from that procedure onto the keyboard. Preventive technology, such as Cleankeys and CleanSweep, can be game-changing in helping to reduce the spread of these hospital pathogens”.” says Dr. John Conly, founder of the Medical Ward of the 21st Century who conducted the study.
“Health care-acquired infections are one of the biggest problems facing hospitals today,” says Randy Marsden, CEO of Cleankeys Inc. and inventor of the Cleankeys keyboard. “We are excited to be part of the solution to preventing these infections, protecting patients and staff, and reducing these costs with Cleankeys. Given the contamination level of keyboards in hospital settings, Cleankeys has the potential of significantly reducing hospital-acquired infections.”
Infection control experts are taking notice, “Everything is swabbed and wiped clean in a medical environment except the keyboard,” says Dr. Richard Fedorak, Professor of Medicine at the University of Alberta. “We have no real ability to clean them aside from blowing the dust off. This is not sufficient to keep keyboards clean and prevent the transfer of infection.” In fact, the study suggests that cleaning compliance is low to none.
Cleankeys is designed to solve this problem. The Cleankeys flat-surface lacks the gaps and edges of conventional keyboards, and the touch-sensitive glass surface stands up to hospital disinfectants. It cleans in seconds.
“Cleankeys keyboard complies with our department’s motto: It should be easy to do it right!” says Birgitta Eriksson in the neonatal unit at Akademiska Children’s Hospital in Sweden (Uppsala University Hospital).