Sirolimus-Eluting Stent Demonstrates Superior Results

photo: heart

A new study investigates the
detailed arterial responses to
the DES technology; © Pixelio

The new sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) utilizes a reservoir technology that incorporates a number of small wells, each acting as a depot into which drug-polymer compositions are loaded. The stent's design achieves both a significant reduction in total polymer load as well as a reduction in tissue-polymer contact by more than 75% compared to conventional DES in which the entire stent surface is coated with polymer. Its use of a bioresorbable polymer is another theoretical advantage from the safety perspective, allowing the drug-eluting stent to become simple bare metal within the vessel wall approximately 3 months after deployment.

In the clinical trial, detailed arterial responses to the new DES technology were also investigated in vivo using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). With IVUS, a tiny catheter is inserted into a coronary vessel where high-frequency sound waves reflect off tissue or vessel walls. The reflected waves create a cross-sectional image from within the vessel to aid in visualizing its structure, thereby providing both quantitative and qualitative information on vessel reaction after stenting.

Serial IVUS (immediately post-stenting and 6-month follow-up) was performed in a pre-defined IVUS subset of 100 patients (52 SES in 50 patients; 52 PES in 50 patients). Volumetric IVUS analysis demonstrated significantly less neointimal proliferation in the sirolimus-eluting stent (% neointimal volume: 5.5±11.0 vs. 11.5±9.7, p=0.016), resulting in less late lumen area loss and smaller maximum cross-sectional narrowing (neointimal area/stent area) than PES. In addition, serial IVUS analysis revealed significantly less outward vessel remodeling in the SES than in PES. The incidence of late-acquired incomplete stent apposition (ISA) was similar between the SES and PES. However, SES was associated with less outward vessel remodeling at the ISA segment, possibly suggesting different underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon.

Hiromasa Otake, MD of Stanford University, said: "Our study confirmed that the advanced formulation strategy of this new DES can perform with efficacy exceeding a first-generation DES with the potential for improved long-term safety because it turns into a bare metal stent within 3 months. This stent may be a promising DES option to treat the patients with coronary artery disease while embracing the long-term safety of bare metal stents."; Source: Cardiovascular Research Foundation