Picture: Skin 
Before and after pictures from
the study; © University of
Michigan

Researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M) Medical School tested lotions containing retinol – Vitamin A that is found in many skin-care products – on the skin of elderly patients. Lotion containing retinol was used on one arm of each participant, while a lotion without retinol was applied to the other arm.

Wrinkles, roughness and overall aging severity were all significantly reduced in the retinol-treated arm compared with the control arm. The production of collagen, due to the retinol treatment, also makes it more likely that the skin can withstand injury and ulcer formation, researchers say.

“With the population aging so rapidly, it is important that we find ways of treating skin conditions of elderly people – not just for purposes of vanity, but also for the healing of wounds and the reduction of ulcers,” says senior author Sewon Kang, M.D., professor of dermatology at the U-M Medical School.

“In the past, it was everyone believed that retinoids would treat only photoaging, or damage from exposure to sun. This is the first systematic, double-blind study showing that it improves any kind of aging – photoaging as well as natural aging,” says co-author John J. Voorhees, M.D., chair of the Department of Dermatology at the U-M Medical School.

The lotion was made at U-M, but the university will not commercialize this lotion because it was designed only for experimental purposes and, therefore, is cosmetically undesirable. Many retinol containing cosmeceutical creams, however, are sold by various companies. Those specific products were not tested by the U-M team.

The reduction of wrinkles in the study’s participants was due to increased collagen production and a significant induction of glycosaminoglycans, which are known to retain large quantities of water. In general, aging skin tends to be thinner, laxer and more prone to fine wrinkles than young skin.

MEDICA.de; Source: University of Michigan Health System