This neuropeptide is called CGRP – calcitonin gene-related peptide – and studies have shown that it plays a key role in migraine headaches. In particular, CGRP levels are elevated in the blood during migraine, and drugs that either reduce the levels of CGRP or block its action significantly reduce the pain of migraine headaches. Also, if CGRP is injected into people who are susceptible to migraines, they get a severe headache or a full migraine.

"We have shown that this RAMP protein is a key regulator for the action of CGRP," said Andrew Russo, Ph.D., professor of molecular physiology and biophysics at University of Iowa (UI). "Our study suggests that people who get migraines may have higher levels of RAMP1 than people who don't get migraines."

RAMP1 is a normal, required subunit of the CGRP receptor. Russo and his colleagues found that overexpression of RAMP1 protein in nerve cells increased the sensitivity and responsiveness of CGRP receptors to the neuropeptide - more RAMP1 made CGRP receptors react to much lower concentrations of CGRP than usual and caused the receptors to respond more vigorously to the neuropeptide.

The UI team also engineered mice to express human RAMP1 in their nervous system in addition to the normal mouse version of the protein. These mice had double the amount of inflammation in response to CGRP than did normal mice. Nerve-induced inflammation is one of the effects associated with migraine headache.

Russo explained that his study raises the possibility that people who have migraines may have subtle genetic differences in the RAMP1 gene that result in increased levels of RAMP1 protein.

"There is clearly a genetic difference between people who get migraines and those who do not, and we think that difference could be RAMP1. Our studies provide a reason to look for variations in the DNA that encodes RAMP1 in humans," he said.; Source: University of Iowa