InterComponentWare AG

Practical example: How does hospital networking work?

At a precautionary medical check up Anne Newman’s gynaecologist feels a lump in her right breast, which she examines more closely using ultrasound. To clarify the suspicion of breast cancer her doctor places copies of the ultrasound recordings in Mrs Newman’s LifeSensor personal health record and refers her to a radiologist for a mammogram.

The mammogram cannot exclude the tentative diagnosis entirely. Therefore the image and findings are copied into her personal health record and the patient is referred back to the gynaecologist. To clarify the situation further an open biopsy is to be conducted and Mrs Newman is admitted to hospital.

When she checks into the hospital, Mrs Newman’s master patient data are entered in the hospital information system. ICW’s enterprise master patient index (MPI) compares this information with the data already held by the hospital group and establishes that a Mrs Newman with the same first name, date of birth but a different address has already been treated in another hospital. Mrs Newman informs the hospital’s patient administration that she moved last year. So the data stored from her first stay in hospital is now assigned to the medical knowledge index (MKI) of the newly admitted Mrs Newman. And the treating doctor is now immediately aware of the fact that Mrs Newman is allergic to anaesthetics.

Subsequently, the data stored in the LifeSensor personal health record is transferred to the medical knowledge index. This means the hospital doctor has immediate access to the referrals and examination results of the gynaecologist and radiologist in digital format.

The biopsy of the suspicious lump shows it to be a benign neoplasm. Mrs Newman is referred by the hospital back to her gynaecologist. She immediately locates the discharge letter and diagnosis in Mrs Newman’s personal health record and can continue her treatment without delay.