Portion-Control Dishes Help Diabetics Lose Weight

Picture: A bowl with rice

This might not have happened
with a portion-control dish

Sue D. Pedersen, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., and colleagues at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, conducted a six-month controlled trial of commercially available portion control plates and bowls. The plates were divided into sections for carbohydrates, proteins, cheese and sauce, with the rest left open for vegetables. The sections approximately totalled an 800-calorie meal for men and a 650-calorie meal for women. The cereal bowl is designed to allow a 200-calorie meal of cereal and milk.

Half of 130 obese patients with diabetes (average age 56) were randomly assigned to use the plate for their largest meal and the bowl when they ate cereal for breakfast. The other half of the participants received usual care, which consisted of dietary assessment and teaching by dieticians.

At the end of the six-month follow-up, 122 patients remained in the study. Individuals using the portion-control dishes lost an average of 1.8 percent of their body weight, while those receiving usual care lost an average of 0.1 percent. A significantly larger proportion of those using the dishes—16.9 percent vs. 4.6 percent—lost at least 5 percent of their body weight.

“This is important, as a 5 percent weight loss has been shown to be clinically significant in terms of decreasing morbidity and mortality associated with obesity-linked disorders such as cancer and myocardial infarction,” the authors of the study write. In addition, more of those in the intervention group versus the regular care group experienced a decrease in their use of diabetes medications after six months (26.2 percent vs. 10.8 percent).

“In conclusion, the portion control tool studied in this trial was effective in inducing weight loss in obese persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus comparable to that seen in investigations of weight loss pharmacotherapy,” the authors write.

MEDICA.de; Source: American Medical Association