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Developing a sensor for vitamin B12 deficiency
University of Adelaide researchers have developed a world-first optical sensor that can detect vitamin B12 in diluted human blood - a first step towards a low-cost, portable, broadscale vitamin B12 deficiency test. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
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Basic structure of ultrasound power supply and communication
Unlike drugs, active implants such as electroceuticals act locally, have fewer side effects and function directly through electrical signals, much like the body itself. Fraunhofer researchers presenting a new technology platform that can power active implants wirelessly via ultrasound. The experts are targeting widespread diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetes and Parkinson's.
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Virtual experience gets the elderly to exercise
Virtual Reality can get the elderly in nursing homes to be happier about exercising. A new research project from Aalborg University shows that the technology motivates older people in nursing homes to get moving.
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Patients weigh in on orthopedic surgeons' pay, reimbursement
Most patients do not think an orthopedic surgeon is overpaid but they greatly exaggerate how much a surgeon is reimbursed by Medicare for performing knee surgery, according to a study of patient perceptions by Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.
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Brand-new cochlear implant technology born from frictional electricity
DGIST Professor Hongsoo Choi (Department of Robotics Engineering) and his research team developed the world's first artificial basilar membrane that mimics the cochlear function by application of the genetic principle of frictional electricity.
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How does friendly fire happen in the pancreas?
In type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research, and their colleagues at Technical University of Munich have now reported in the journal PNAS about a mechanism used by the immune system to prepare for this attack.
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Better diabetic foot disease care would save taxpayers billions
Australia could save billions of dollars in healthcare costs by investing in proven treatments for people with diabetic foot disease, according to QUT research.
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Computer simulation breaks virus apart to learn how it comes together
Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicist Markus Deserno and University of Konstanz (Germany) chemist Christine Peter have developed a computer simulation that crushes viral capsids.
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Reshaping the future of global clinical trials practice
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a new international guideline to help standardize how results from clinical trial studies are reported.
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Imaging technique maps serotonin activity in living brains
Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. This makes it a common target for antidepressants, which block serotonin from being reabsorbed by neurons after it has dispatched its signal, so more of it stays floating around the brain.
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