One in Four HIV Patients Do Not Stay in Care

Photo: AIDS patient receives medication

Women, white patients, older
patients, male patients who
were infected via sex with men,
and patients who began
treatment on Medicare were all
more likely to remain in care
more consistently;
© panthermedia.net/Ruta
Balciunaite

"Helping patients with HIV stay in care is a key way to reduce their chances of getting sick from their disease and prevent the spread of HIV in the community. Our findings show that too many patients are falling through the cracks," says the study's lead author, Doctor Baligh R. Yehia. "The benefits of keeping patients in care are clear both for patients and the community at large, and it may even result in decreased health care costs by preventing unnecessary hospitalisation for an acute illness."

The researchers studied 17,425 adult patients cared for at 12 clinics within the HIV Research Network, a consortium that cares for HIV-infected patients across the nation, between 2001 and 2008. Just 42 per cent of patients studied had what researchers defined as "no gap" in treatment — intervals of no more than six months in between outpatient visits — over the timeframe studied, while 31 per cent had one or more seven- to 12-month gaps in care. 28 per cent appeared to have gone without care for more than a year on one or more occasions. Since there is no gold standard on the best way to measure retention in care, the team used three different measures of retention to examine each patient’s visit record.

Women, white patients, older patients, male patients who were infected via sex with men, and patients who began treatment on Medicare (compared to those on private insurance) were all more likely to remain in care more consistently. Retention was also greater among patients whose CD4 counts — the measure of how advanced the disease is — were very low, at the point associated with AIDS, when they entered care.

The team suggests that their findings may help guide clinicians in assessing which patients are more likely to follow their prescribed visit schedule, and develop intervention strategies to improve their chances of adhering to their care. "Clinicians need to know what barriers to screen for, so our findings help to better define groups of patients who may require extra help to stay on track," says Doctor Kelly Gebo of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Housing, transportation and financial problems, substance abuse and mental illness can all be contributors to problems with care retention, and patients who do not have symptoms may not believe they are "sick" enough to require regular visits with their providers.

MEDICA.de; Source: Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania