The study conducted by researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that type 2 diabetes accounts for up to 95 percent of all diabetes cases and virtually all undiagnosed diabetes cases. Over the years studied, about 26 percent of adults age 20 and older continued to have impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a form of pre-diabetes.

"It's important to know if you have pre-diabetes or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes," said Dr. Larry Blonde, chair of the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), jointly sponsored by the NIH, CDC, and 200 partner organisations. "You should talk to your health care professional about your risk. If your blood glucose is high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes, losing weight and increasing physical activity will greatly lower your risk of getting type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, controlling your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol will prevent or delay the complications of diabetes."

The researchers also found that nearly 22 percent of people age 65 and older had diabetes. IFG and undiagnosed diabetes were about 70 percent more common in men than in women, especially in non-Hispanic white men. Nearly 40 percent of people age 65 and older had IFG, which becomes more common with age.

"We're seeing a rising prevalence of diagnosed diabetes that is not substantially offset by a drop in the rate of undiagnosed - about one-third of adults with diabetes still don't know they have it. Another 26 percent of adults have a form of pre-diabetes," said lead author Catherine Cowie, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

MEDICA.de; Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases