Our Interviews about Innovations

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Inventions, technologies, devices - something new always happens in the field of medical technology. Experts, researchers and inventors talk about prospects of new treatments and sometimes also their dangers - at MEDICA-tradefair.com.

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Overview: Older Interviews

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Graphic: Hand holds a smartphone, four pictures in the background with rescue situations

Emergency: app alerts first responders


Just a few minutes can make the difference between life and death when a person loses consciousness or goes into sudden cardiac arrest. Unfortunately, emergency medical services cannot always be on location as fast as needed. To ensure immediate life-sustaining measures, the "mobile rescue" app was developed, which alerts emergency medical responders in the immediate vicinity of an emergency.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?


The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: Old woman with a smartphone

Health Apps: "Mobile Applications for smartphones have strengths and weaknesses"


Medical apps like diabetes or high blood pressure diaries are becoming increasingly popular with smartphone users. There are many available choices out there but they are not always clear. Added to this is the question of how the data collected by the apps can be sensibly incorporated into treatment.
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Graphic: The pancreas and the surrounding organs

Pancreatic cancer: diagnosis via signature analysis


Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because it is difficult to diagnose and only presents with symptoms in the later stages. In the future, a laboratory test developed at the Greifswald University Medicine could make an early detection of this type of cancer and consequently a faster and better treatment possible.
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Photo: Researcher is looking at a microfluidic LabDisc

Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis


Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene


Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: Knee implant

Customized Implants cover bones optimally


It may fits, but somewhere it still tweaks. Although a suit off the rack serves its purpose, it is still far from being an ideal solution. With a custom made heart it is different. It is similar with implants. Often patients complain about the fact that those implants feel strange. 3D printing is on the best way to change this. Here, the implants are adapted to the carrier.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."


There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: white implant lying in petri dish

Repairing the bile duct with bacterial nanocellulose


The closure apparatus between the gallbladder and small intestine is frequently injured during gallbladder surgeries. So far, however, there has been no surgical option to bridge tissue defects. Now, a novel implant made of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) could change this. Its nanofiber network makes it extremely robust so that it is able to take on a supporting function.
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Photo: Secretary Svenja Schulze talks with students

Building bridges between technology and marketing


Marketing has become an indispensable tool. Who nowadays wants to establish a product on the market has to recognize and implement the interests and needs of the customer. Prof. Uwe Kleinkes leads the study program "Technical Management and Marketing" at the Hamm-Lippstadt University. Here students learn, among other things, to develop ideas, to communicate them and to convince the customer.
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