Novel Implant Shaped Specifically to Fit Woman's Anatomy

Mainly constructed for male purposes:
knee joint implants; ©

Dr. Aaron G. Rosenberg and Dr. Richard A. Berger, orthopaedic surgeons at Rush University Medical Center, were two of the ten developer surgeons who sought to address shape-related differences of a woman's knee.

The high-flex implant is designed based on three distinct and scientifically documented shape differences between women's and men's knees. The implant addresses the shape-related differences typical of a woman's knee: a narrower shape; thinner shape, and the need for more natural motion for the knee when walking.

"Knee implants have been functioning very well for men and women, but we want to meet women's unique needs by making knee replacements that feel, fit and function even better," says Rosenberg. "Mounting research indicates that a woman's knee is not simply a smaller version of a man's knee. The differences involve the bones, ligaments and tendons in the joints," Rosenberg adds. “It makes perfect sense to design knee implants with women in mind, particularly considering that women are by far the majority of the knee replacement patient population."

Nearly two-thirds of the more than 400,000 annual knee replacement patients are women, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, and the numbers continue to increase each year. Research shows that while both women and men vastly under use knee replacement, women are three times less likely than men to undergo the procedure, although they suffer from more knee pain and resulting disability.

The female implant can be placed using minimally invasive techniques which typically offer smaller scars, shorter hospitalisation and quicker rehabilitation and recovery; and safely accommodates high flexion (up to 155 degrees), which is necessary for many activities, such as climbing stairs, sitting in a chair, gardening and golfing.; Source: Rush University Medical Center