Picture: The silhouette of a woman 
Most patients are happy with
their new sex; © Pixelio.de

A research team from the Departments of Urology and Psychiatry at University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, UK, explored the initial experiences of 222 patients who had undergone surgery and 70 who took part in detailed follow-ups. They found that 88 per cent of patients were happy with their surgery at their first post-operative clinic visit, seven per cent were unhappy and five per cent made no comment.

All the patients studied had had their penis surgically removed, their urethra repositioned and female labia constructed. Ninety-three percent had a clitoris constructed using a section of the glans of their penis and 91 per cent had a skin-lined vagina. The 70 contacted patients who had undergone surgery ranged from 19 to 76 years of age, with an average age of 43.

Most had had surgery about three years before. 91 per cent had had a clitoris created and 89 per cent had had a vagina created. Twenty-three percent of the patients had, or were having, regular intercourse and 61 per cent were happy with the depth of their vagina. Ninety-eight percent had a sensitive clitoris and 48 per cent were able to achieve orgasm. 14 percent were hypersensitive but none had elected to have their clitoris removed.

Twenty-nine percent were troubled by vaginal hair growth, six percent had had a vaginal prolapse and three percent had vaginal necrosis. Twenty-seven percent reported urinary problems and the majority of these needed revision surgery. “Despite these problems, which were mainly minor and easily corrected by secondary surgery, 76 per cent of the patients who provided detailed feedback were happy with the cosmetic result of their surgery and 80 per cent said the surgery had met their expectations” concludes lead author, urology registrar Jonathan C Goddard.

MEDICA.de; Source: Blackwell Publishing