Maxine Singer Awarded with Welfare Medal

"Maxine has a sterling record of leadership in the scientific community, and embodies the concept of citizen-scientist in every endeavour she undertakes," said current Carnegie president Richard A. Meserve. "She has strengthened Carnegie's legacy, as well as that of every institution with which she has been affiliated, through her tireless dedication to advancing science for the good of humankind."

Singer is a pioneer of molecular biology and an accomplished leader in science policy. She has championed the cause of women and minorities in science by fostering equal access to education and career opportunities, and has worked tirelessly to improve science education.

Singer has spoken out authoritatively on the issue of genetic manipulation in research and biomedical applications. She was among the first to publicly raise the issue of recombinant DNA's potential risks, and advocated for self regulation in the scientific community. As chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, Singer addressed graduate education, postdoctoral scholarship, the plight of women in science, and scientific conduct.

Under her leadership, the committee has had a major effect on science policy, producing influential reports including "Scientific and Medical Aspects of Human Reproductive Cloning" and "Enhancing the Post-Doctoral Experience for Scientists and Engineers." The latter resulted in a long-overdue empowerment of postdoctoral fellows on university campuses, along with changes to federal policies.

"Dr. Singer represents the best aspects of scientific citizenship," said Ralph J. Cicerone, president of the National Academy of Sciences. "Today the Academy officially recognizes her dedication and accomplishments in public service."; Source: Carnegie Institution